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Question #91965 posted on 01/19/2019 3:10 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I like real-time strategy video games a lot: Starcraft, Age of Empires, Command&Conquer etc. But they also don't pay any money because I'm not pro. And my wife wisely wouldn't approve of me being a professional computer gamer. Is there a career that aligns closely to playing strategy video games?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear Aziraphale,

I would suggest going into video game development. That way, you can be the one to develop the kinds of strategies you like so well.

Barring that, really any job involving algorithm design requires a lot of strategy; you might find it as engaging as some of these video games.

~Anathema

A:

Dear D,

While video game development might be an option, there are many other skills required for that career than simply enjoying video games. Instead I would suggest project management. There are many similarities in Project Management to RTS games like managing your resources properly (time, money, future projects), knowing who you can trust (Mark is really a brilliant guy but he can't explain his thoughts clearly so I'll send Jerry to this meeting on the project), and even competition if you are in the right field (our company needs to get this feature out as soon as possible because Competitors Inc. started advertising for it but we can do it better than them). 

That's just one option. Look at the parts of RTS games that you like and find a career that does those things. If you like the visual aspects then you could go into design. If you like the teamwork aspect get a job where you aren't sitting in a cubicle by yourself but work with people more interactively. There are lots of options.

I will note that one part of video games that most people like is the burst of serotonin you get from winning a match or getting rewarded frequently. That's also the same reason people are drawn to certain social media platforms. This probably won't happen as often in your job but that doesn't mean your job isn't worth it. There's a reason you "play" videos games but you don't "play" on projects at your job (unless you work at Legoland, then you really do play at your job).

-Spectre


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Friday, January 18, 2019
Posted on 01/18/2019 9:31 p.m. New Correction on: #91757 Today I was driving by a church building (belonging to another Christian denomination) with a "for ...
Question #91958 posted on 01/18/2019 12:46 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does the church announce when they bring out new garment styles or retire old ones?

I really like the new women's top design with the reduced fabric under the arm, but I wish they had it in a more breathable fabric, but I don't know if they would announce that. I maybe get new garments every 2 or 3 years, and I always feel like I don't know what I'm going to get because things are tweaked.

Garmley

A:

Dear you,

I don't know if they always do, but they made an announcement for the most recent changes to fabrics and such (source). Also, you can apparently give feedback and make requests, or order discontinued fabrics on lds.org. If you have more questions here's a link to some FAQs about the new fabrics that are coming out. Hope this helps!

Peace,

Tipperary


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Question #91964 posted on 01/18/2019 12:46 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am having a terrible time stucturing my life. I find myself reading books or doing random things until later than midnight, and lately, it has become a problem.
I know that I need to create structure in my life and just work for it, and it's hard. I have a few ideas, but I need as much help as I can get.
As an aside, I want to know how to best ask other people for help.

Thanks,
-plase respond quick im procrastinating some assignments

A:

Dear you,

Are you me? I've definitely had issues with this in the past. And by "the past," I mean "last week." The first week of classes is especially hard for getting a solid schedule because you're still adjusting. This week, though, I've been a lot better, and I've even learned some new tricks. Here are some things that help me:

  • Exercise: I used to have an issue with staying up late wasting time, but I started doing aerobics and now I just get home and fall asleep. It might be tiring the first week, but I've already seen my energy and focus levels go up and my sleep schedule even out.
  • Working on assignments on campus: I always do homework on campus. It's a lot easier for me to focus go for walks on study breaks: it's important to take a short 5-10 minute study break every hour, but I find that when I go on internet study breaks I usually end up wasting a bunch of time. Walks are great and help me clear my mind and focus. 
  • Setting specific times to work on assignments: After 1-2 weeks I like to get into a routine of doing homework at the same time. For example, I might do my biology quiz on Monday morning, my writing assignments Tuesday evening, etc. this helps me to not forget things and stay focused on one thing 
  • Joining a study group: This is even better. creating a study group and scheduling a time makes you accountable. Plus, you can help each other out on assignments. 

When it comes to asking other people for help, I'm not sure how best to help you because I don't know why it's difficult for you. Do you have a hard time swallowing your pride and admitting you need help? Do you have social anxiety about talking to people? Do you not want to bother people?

I've got two suggestions that I think are just good in general.

  1. Ask your TAs for help. They are literally being paid to help you and have time scheduled specifically for that. They have lots of experience helping people and are TAs because they like doing it. They are the easiest people to ask for help. Practice by talking to them and it'll be a lot more comfortable to ask others for help.
  2. Join a study group. Make some friends in class and start a study group. The point of a study group is for everyone to ask everyone for help so it feels a lot less awkward and everyone helps everyone. I hope this helps. Good luck and maybe get off the Board once you read this so you can finish your assignments!

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear hey look I'm doing the same thing,

Tipperary gave an awesome response, and I honestly don't have much to add to it. I want to echo the importance of study groups. In my experience, it seems like a group of 3-4 people makes for the optimal study group size (any more, and the group tends to be highly susceptible to distraction and tangents). Study groups help for both structure (they give you people to be accountable to, which I think is huge), and having people to collaborate with on hard assignments. Furthermore, with a good study group, you will never have to be the person on Learning Suite pleading for notes for a missed class period--you have go-to set of people for situations like that.

For asking people for help, Tipperary hit the nail on the head; your TA's are there to be asked questions. Your professors are also there to help. Even professors who don't teach any of your classes are oftentimes willing to help. I have literally ambushed professors from whom I hadn't taken any classes from with questions when I'm super desperate for help. And all the times I've done this, the professor has actually helped me understand the material better than I ever could have otherwise. Besides, professors tend to be pretty cool (not to mention well connected) people. 

Good luck, friend.

~Anathema


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Question #91947 posted on 01/18/2019 12:46 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the best way I can go about tracking down The Lost Rhoads Mine?

-A. A. Davidson

A:

Dear Triple A,

I dug deep into the rabbit hole of the internet and here's what I learned about the mine.

  • There's not any solid historical proof that the mine actually exists. Most of the websites I visited didn't seem to be authoritative sources, and most of the references to the mine are stories.
  • The alleged location of the mine is in the Uintah mountains in the Ute Indian Reservation. The Reservation covers 4.5 Million Acres (source), which hardly narrows things down.
  • In all of the stories, the Ute tribe only allowed one person to know the location of the mine. Those who tried to find the mine by themselves were killed or mysteriously disappeared. 

Based off my searching, searching for The Lost Rhoads Mine is not advisable. If the mine is real, finding it on your own would be nearly impossible. Basically, you would need to be trusted by the leadership of the Ute tribe and given the location (again, this is assuming that the mine is real. I believe it isn't, because otherwise the tribe would be profiting off of it). However, if you are looking for some really cool stories and maps, I highly recommend learning more about The Lost Rhoads Mine. You won't find the gold, but you'll find that the fun you had reading the stories was the real treasure all along.

Peace,

Tipperary


0 Corrections