Well, if I called the wrong number, why did you answer the phone? -James Thurber
Question #91903 posted on 12/18/2018 3:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just got hired in my first non-freelance and also major-related job and, after two months, am going a little crazy and really miss freelancing. Everyone I know says to stay for the full-time benefits but, if I'm being honest with myself, all I want to do is build up my freelancing work on the side and eventually go back to it. I literally feel like I live in The Office every day and my coworkers are super nice, but I feel like I was a lot better and happier when I could work from home.

In this situation, what would you do? Would you wait a few years before leaving if the coworkers are nice and the only issue is that you miss what you used to do? Have any of you worked office jobs before and how did you make it bearable? Also, why is life after college so stressful?

-aghghghghgh

A:

Dear person,

I believe that life is too short to hate your job when you have the luxury of pursuing other reasonable employment options. 

Story time to answer your question: I got a well-paying office job after graduating from my undergrad. I hated every moment and stuck it out for one year, the length of my contract. I declined an extension despite the fact that I didn't get into a graduate program and would have to wait at least another year to start. After quitting my job, I got three new jobs. I was a merchandiser at a Home Depot garden center, a babysitter/nanny for a family who had two children on the autism spectrum, and did odd jobs for a small business. I made a bit less money but I enjoyed my life a heck of a lot more. I thought it was well worth taking a pay cut to be active, with plants, with kids, and have flexibility.

I found that listening to podcasts and making friends with my coworkers (some of whom, fortunately, were extremely cool) made the terrible office job more bearable. But the boredom and the bureaucracy were still very miserable for me. I don't think anything could have made that job a pleasant or even neutral experience. My personality was fundamentally a bad match for the culture of my company (baby boomer) and the tasks I had to do (clerical). I often felt like this husky on the inside. 

Thankfully, I am now in grad school. I don't make much money and it's really hard because I have so much to do. However, it's also enjoyable and at the end I will have the qualifications I need to have a fun, challenging, meaningful, and rewarding career. I'm really glad I took the risks that I did instead of staying at the company offering financial security.

Obviously, everyone's situation is different. I was in a position where I did not have dependents, which obviously would have impacted my decision because I would have needed more money. Also, I lived in a place that paid reasonable wages (i.e., not Utah). I'm not sure what your situation is. However, I hope you find a way to be happy with whatever you choose.

-Sheebs


0 Corrections
Monday, December 17, 2018
Question #91896 posted on 12/17/2018 5:45 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Throughout my life I've tried to do ALL the things. For example, I've been taking an average of 17 credits a semester since I've been here at BYU. I like to learn new things and challenge myself, and a lot of the classes I'm doing are project based, and I work, and I have side projects etc.

Except, to the surprise of no one, it's not turning out as well as I would hope because it turns out that there's not enough time and energy to do all those things. It can't be done, and it shouldn't be done.

Buuuut, I always fall into the same trap of biting off more than I can chew. It's hard to drop things because each thing isn't a huge time commitment, but together they all add up to more than I can handle. How can I make tough decisions to do less? What can I do to break free of the bad habit of over committing myself?

-A friend

A:

Dear Aziraphale,

Not sure I can give super good advice on this, but boy can I commiserate! 

Basically at the beginning of every semester ever, I'm inordinately optimistic about all the things and commitments I'll be able to keep, "Work two jobs, make research breakthroughs, join a team to build a deep learning emoji language translator, keep on top of job applications/interviews, graduate school tests/applications, all while crushing my course load of 11 graduate credits plus a few normal credits? Sounds totally reasonable!" (In case you were wondering, this was me at the beginning of this past semester.) However, as the semester goes on, and I get more and more crushed by my load, things slip. And honestly, I really hate that feeling of not doing something well when doing well was what I wanted (who doesn't?).  Yet that feeling is almost always inevitable considering what I consistently set myself up to do. The only way to avoid it is to consciously drop things before I'm wracked with guilt/regret.

I suppose the point I'm attempting to make is that even if you over-commit yourself at the beginning of a semester, you can always chooses to drop things later if you're getting too overwhelmed. Like, you can duck out of clubs, drop classes, or simply move certain items to the bottom of your priority list, and not worry if you don't get to them in a given week.

Anyways, this is a real problem, and one I wish I could give you a better answer for. But know at least that you have my heart felt empathy.

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #91889 posted on 12/17/2018 5:45 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the full story to the Party Rock zombie apocalypse?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear Aziraphale,

If it were from the '70s, I'd say lots of late nights and drugs.

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #91868 posted on 12/17/2018 5:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the laws for knives and tasers in Utah? Can I carry them around for self-defense?

Thanks

A:

Dear you,

Considering I carry a taser, I figured I should also really find the answer for this. For tasers, according to this site (provided by Quixotic Kid), Utah has no restrictions. So, tasers are free game to carry around for self defense. As far as knives are concerned, this site is super helpful (again, link provided by Quixotic Kid). Essentially, knives are generally fine to carry, as long as you aren't a certain list, and the knife you're carrying isn't too scary.

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Posted on 12/17/2018 12:13 a.m. New Correction on: #91894 What are your thoughts on the song, "Baby, It's Cold Outside"? -Christmas time is here