"If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun." - Katharine Hepburn
Question #91432 posted on 06/21/2018 7:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Let's say I had tons of money (I don't) and wanted to set up a scholarship for a high school. I understand that some scholarships are set up with some kind of self-renewing funds. How does that work? Do they just have a ton deposited in the bank so they get enough interest every year to cover things? Or do they do fancy stuff like invest in mutual funds or something?

How much money would you need saved up (or invested or whatever) to offer at least a $1,000 scholarship every year and not ever deplete the account?

-Hopefully I will be rich and need to know this like 20 years from now

A:

Dear you,

Here's Wikipedia's basic explanation of how financial endowments work. You may hear about not just a university's overall "endowment" but also things like "Professor So-and-so, the Endowed Chair of X." There's also a brief blurb on endowed scholarships.

The gist of it, explained in this quote from the above article, is that:

[An] endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact, while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for their donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. 

I'd personally be pretty shocked (especially given the terms 'investment' v 'principle') as used above if most endowment funds were merely banked, as that's just an inefficient way to store money that's intended for long-term rather than short-term stuff. I'm guessing that many organizations large enough to have self-perpetuating endowment funds are also large enough to either have their own financial managers or to have at least hired someone to do that, so investment should be well-within their capabilities.

With regards to a $1000 annual scholarship, how much money you'd need could vary, but according to this source, $20,000-$25,000 is probably the ballpark you're looking at. Don't know if BYU has a specific amount, but if you wanted to run the scholarship through them rather than administer it yourself, you could contact LDS Philanthropies and ask them for BYU-specific details, if that's your alma mater.

(As a side note, that's in the same area as the "4% rule," which you may hear about in relation to retirement savings/expenditures.)

Good luck!

~Anne, Certainly


0 Corrections
Question #91456 posted on 06/21/2018 3:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is strict sex the only thing you can be kicked out of BYU for? What about hand jobs?

- Mallory

A:

Dear Mallory,

The exact behavior that could get you expelled from the university is up to the discretion of your bishop and the Honor Code Office. In theory any sexual behavior could have that consequence, depending on the circumstance.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Mallory,

If I could guess at why you're asking this question, you're either considering doing something like that, you already have done it and feel nervous talking to others/your bishop about it, or it's a random question that came up and you don't know the answer. To the first possibility: even if you completely disregarded the law of chastity and anything to do with God, there is a chance that people will find out and you could face problems at BYU. Like Luciana said, that does depend on the Honor Code Office and your standing at the university (for instance, some sport players at BYU have gotten away with breaking the Honor Code, while most students are punished or expelled for such actions). If this is something you're considering doing, I would say to wait until after you leave BYU. Again, completely ignoring the spiritual side of this, I don't think that's worth possibly jeopardizing a greatly subsidized education.

If it's something that has already happened, I want to assure you that there are great bishops who separate your spiritual life and BYU. I have friends who have talked to their bishop about doing similar things, and the bishop's number one priority is to help them and won't involve BYU unless absolutely necessary. I can't speak for all bishops, but if you ask around your ward you can get a sense of what your bishop's like. And if you aren't sure but want to talk to someone/a bishop, you can always email me or I can send you my bishop's info, because he's possibly the greatest YSA bishop in Provo. 

And if this was just a random question, by this point you're like, "What on earth is guppy doing? I just had a random question, and now she's offering to send me her bishop's information? She's worse than the Honor Code Office!" Well, Mallory, I'm sorry you had to read my whole answer, because there's really nothing more to add to Luciana's answer. It really just depends on your bishop and the Honor Code Office, and that applies to basically all sexual behavior.

-guppy of doom


0 Corrections
Question #91438 posted on 06/21/2018 7:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you ever been depressed for so long that you lose your emotions? I feel so numb that I can't even feel anything anymore and it scares me. It's like nothing really matters. How do you get your emotions back?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear you,

I would start by treating the depression as best you can. Talk to a therapist, and if medication is the best option for you, take it regularly. Depression is caused by a chemical imbalance, and treating that should be the first step.

The biggest result of my experience with depression is the conviction that I never want anyone else, especially my loved ones, to feel that empty and hopeless. It may not be entirely in my power to prevent that, but it inspires me to be a better friend and family member and consistently show people how much I love and appreciate them. So whenever I find myself starting to feel numb or depressed, I reach out to the people I love and remind them how much they mean to me, in any way I can manage. Sometimes, if the depressed feelings are particularly strong, all I can manage is a "How are you" text. But doing so helps remind me that even if I don't have emotions at the moment and even if I can't manage to care about my own life, there are other people in the world who are wonderful and deserving of the happiness I can't seem to find. Even the emotion of caring about someone else is better than the emptiness, and reminds me that life is worth living .

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Question #91451 posted on 06/20/2018 6:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

At what age of children do you think is inappropriate for people to post naked pictures (or maybe semi naked. Is there a scale here?) of their kids on social media?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear you,

Personally, I don't ever think it's appropriate.

I have no problem with parents taking naked or semi-naked photos of their young children. I have no problem if you want to share those pictures with close friends or family.

But I think posting them on social media is inappropriate and unnecessary.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear you,

My opinions are my opinions and don't have to be your opinions, but here are some guidelines I'd feel more comfortable with for my kids:

1) I'll never post a photo with visible genital nudity for either gender. When I take cute bathtub pics of my baby to send to my parents/in-laws, he's still got a washcloth over him. The only buck-naked photos we have of my son are from when he was in the hospital, and I'm conservative enough to even feel a bit uncomfortable with that. In general, I think that it's wise to avoid naked photos of genital areas even if they're of babies and you plan to keep them private because that doesn't always work out. 

2) For toplessness, I'm probably more personally conservative than many others, and reasonable minds can differ. I'd get uncomfortable with a topless picture of a little girl significantly before sexual dimorphism was apparent, and I don't think there's any age where it's really problematic for a boy. Even if you're less conservative than I am, I would think it's wise to cease any top-nudity in girls certainly by the time any sexual development occurs, as long as we live in a society that considers the breast to be as sexual as ours does (and that's a whole additional discussion).

~Anne, Certainly


0 Corrections
Question #91459 posted on 06/20/2018 4:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When, if ever, do you guess that rolls of receipt paper will go out of mainstream use?

-Dot Matrix

A:

Dear person,

I'm down to speculate. I'm guessing about 10 years. Lots of merchants already email receipts and it's not as necessary to have paper receipts now that we have things like online banking and email. Also, getting a random piece of paper is wasteful. I can't see Millennials keeping these unnecessary vestiges of the paper world once we take over, which will be soon.

-Sheebs, a Millennial 

A:

Dear Dorothy,

Millennials are killing receipt paper!

-Baby Boomers


0 Corrections