"If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun." - Katharine Hepburn
Wednesday, August 12, 2020
Question #93271 posted on 08/12/2020 3:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can any student on campus purchase from and use the machinery in the ECEn shop?

– Dr. Emmett Lathrop Brown, Ph.D.

A:

Dear DELBP,

Yes.

Hope this helps.

Tipperary


0 Corrections
Tuesday, August 11, 2020
Question #93225 posted on 08/11/2020 7:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

The following link detailing the stories of two of Joseph Smith’s wives is utterly repulsive to me. Why does God not allow the girls to exercise agency, for one. In these days we don’t tell a man that he can receive revelation on behalf of someone that they are to marry them and have no choice. And the sheer terror of a girl running away, Joseph Smith using a current plural wife to groom a future wife. This shows all the characteristics of those awful leaders who use power and position to manipulate with fear. Fear is not of God. Again, the link shows something utterly repulsive to me. It is so wrong. And some of the stories of the other wives are not far off. Can someone enlighten me as to how this is ok? Reading history objectively, none of this is cool. And I’m not even against polygamy. But the methods used? Horrendous. And what also doesn’t add up is a number of Joseph’s plural wives being sealed also to Brigham Young. I get it that sealing was different back then (again, how is that a thing if truth is eternal and principles are being restored as they once were) but we don’t seal a woman to more than one man now. Just a man to more than one woman. The stories of these women are horrendous. I knew about the link because Yayfulness shared it on a response on here at one point. Please, tell me how this is ok. Seems like the typical white man in power using religion to get what they want.

http://www.wivesofjosephsmith.org/2021-EmilyandElizaPartridge.htm

-My Name Here

A:

Dear friend,

I previously wrote a really long answer about why polygamy sucks and how you can still have a testimony of Joseph Smith and the Church while believing, as Carol Lynn Pearson does, that polygamy was man-made and one of Joseph's biggest mistakes. I highly recommend reading The Ghost of Eternal Polygamy by Carol Lynn Pearson; it is an incredible book that looks at how polygamy impacts women and men today in the Church and offers a way to better understand it.

I don't think I can properly express how horrified and angry I am about how women were and are treated in the Church through polygamy. It isn't ok. Anyone who tells you it is okay cares more about feeling comfortable with their views of certain men and institutions than about the feelings and experiences of these women.

Also know that by simply recognizing that this is not okay does not mean you have to leave the Church. I know plenty of women and men who are firmly set against polygamy, believe that what Joseph and Brigham did was not okay, and still have a testimony in and love for the Church (such as Carol Lynn Pearson). I also know people who left the Church partly because of this. Simply recognizing the validity and pain of these women's experiences does not mean there is now only one set path for you. Ask questions, pray, study it out in your own mind, and follow what God wants you to do.

If you have any questions or just want to talk, my email is guppyofdoom@theboard.byu.edu.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear you,

Yeah, polygamy is wacky.

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #93269 posted on 08/11/2020 2:11 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you carry cash anymore? When is the last time you paid cash for something? What was it?

-Inquiring Mindless

A:

Dear Inquirer Esq., 

I always carry a little bit of cash, typically around $40. I like to have at least one 5, 10, and 20 in my wallet just in case. 

Despite carrying it with me often, I'm pretty sure the last thing I paid for in cash was a pizza at Cheesus Crust food truck in Kahuku, Hawaii last year. It was daaaang good pizza, and the slightly irreverent pizza puns were pretty funny (for example, their website was cheesusdelivers.com which is hilarious. Sadly, based on their Facebook page it appears Covid has taken its toll and they are selling the business.)

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear Wondering Wanderer,

I usually keep some money in my actual wallet, especially because I think it's good to tip in cash, and I like to give tips when I can. I also have some money in my phone case just "in case". I think it's good to keep some emergency money. I think the last time I paid for something in cash is when my brother and I bought a bookcase from Craigslist and I used the money I had in my wallet and then got Venmo'd for it.

-Inklings

A:

Dear I.M.,

So I just happened to check my honkin' leopard print wallet and I currently have $72 that I haven't bothered to deposit because of baby shower cards. Whoopsies. So yes, I tend to carry around cash because my debit card is persnickety. One time I went to Winco and my debit card kept declining over and over again due to my credit unions error. I freaked out, but thankfully I had enough cash to pay for all of my groceries. Ever since that happened, I want a backup option for Winco since they don't accept credit cards. 

The last time I paid for something in cash was Father's Day cards at the Dollar Tree. I used exact change because I thought it was stupid to use my card for $3 and something cents. I also love getting rid of my pennies so I got rid of some that day!

-Goldie Rose

A:

Dear you,

I generally have around $20. Pretty much the only time I use cash is while camping. However, I did find it interesting that when I went to Japan, pretty much everything was paid for in cash.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Inquiry,

I never carry cash, and haven’t in years. I have no idea when I last paid for something in cash. I’ve heard people say that it’s easier to overspend on a debit card than it is to spend cash, because psychologically we see paying with cash as actually spending money versus just swiping a card, but for me it’s the opposite. If it doesn’t make the balance in my bank account go down I don’t really see it as spending money. So I don’t carry cash because it would just lead to me spending willy nilly on things I don’t actually want to spend on.

-Alta 

A:

Dear reader,

If I have cash, it's because my mom gave it to me. My mom is kind of obsessed with having cash. She always has a random stash somewhere around the house—used to be a cup in the laundry room, now it's a little pouch in her closet. So I usually do have some "just in case" cash in my wallet (my friends are well acquainted with what I call the "mom fund"), but generally I'm like Alta; using cash doesn't feel like actually spending money to me because I don't see my bank account balance drop. I avoid taking cash out because I know once I do, I'll just be like "Well, it's already out of the bank, might as well spend it."

The last time I bought something with cash was when my mom gave me money to buy Thai food for my brother's birthday dinner. In fact, I don't think I can remember the last time I used cash when I wasn't on an errand for my mom. So yeah, if I have cash, it's because my mom gave it to me.

Sincerely,

Cerulean

A:

Dear IM,

I used to carry $20 in my wallet, but minnow got me a phone case with a tiny wallet so now I only carry my driver's license and credit card with me.

Also I completely agree with Alta and Cerulean - my credit card seems much more like "money" than hard cash does, since I base everything off my bank account. Funny how views of money change over time; I remember then-BYU President Holland giving a talk where he recommended "plastic surgery" of cutting up one's credit card to avoid overspending. I'm way more likely to overspend with hard cash than with my credit card.

The last time I paid in cash was....you know, I have no idea. I'm guessing some food item...somewhere...?

-guppy of doom


0 Corrections
Question #93231 posted on 08/11/2020 9:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's up with the choirs of unseen adults I hear singing songs in classic Disney movies? I guess it seems weird to me because I'm used to newer movies where the songs are sung by the characters or at least by solo off-screen singers (like Phil Collins). What kind of people were part of these choirs? Were they common in other films of the time? About when did they end?

Thanks!
-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Prince of Rabbits,

I should maybe call you Prince of Rabbit Holes because I definitely fell down one here. I'm not much of a music person, but I will try to sum up what I learned in the 20+ tabs I currently have up on my browser. But first, readers, if you can't put your finger on exactly what our friend El-ahrairah is talking about, I think this YouTube video called "Remembering the Disney Chorus" will give you a good idea.

It looks like the sort of choral music that you're talking about pretty much faded away from Disney movies in the 1950s. By then, the music in Disney movies was shifting towards jazz. This article about the evolution of Disney music mentions the ballad-y "Bella Notte" from Lady and the Tramp (1955) as sort of the last of its kind; the rest of Lady and the Tramp is pretty upbeat and jazzy.

Like the video I linked above suggests, the artist credited for a lot of these songs is simply Disney Studio Chorus, and I couldn't find a lot on who exactly made up the Disney Studio Chorus. But there are some other groups that show up, like the Jud Conlon Chorus in Alice in Wonderland (1951) and Peter Pan (1953). Basically, I think the answer to who was part of these choirs is just—singers, the same type of people who end up singing in background roles in performances today.

It doesn't seem like having a chorus of singers was particularly common for other movies of the time—most soundtracks I listened to were just orchestral—but it does show up, like in "Optimistic Voices" from The Wizard of Oz (1939). 

But I don't think that means that this music was at all atypical. For example, when I listen to music like this by the Pied Pipers, a popular singing group who had several chart hits in the 1940s, it pretty much just sounds like a Disney movie to me.

Hopefully this is enough to satisfy your curiosity.

Sincerely, 

Cerulean


0 Corrections