"In my defense... I saw 'Bring It On'..." -Anonymous Board Writer

Hey you! We've got some big news! For the full rundown, check out Board Question #90641, but the short version is that we're changing our URL! As of Monday, November 13th, the 100 Hour Board you know and love will now be found at 100hourboard.org. Be sure to update your bookmarks so you don't miss a thing!

Question #90616 posted on 11/20/2017 7:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Sometimes I feel like I’m the only one here who’s not extremely conservative. I consider myself a centrist Republican who’s fiscally conservative but socially liberal in some ways. For example, in my SFL class we read an article that totally made all these generalizations about gender roles (women are driven by emotions and PMS, men just want to have sex, etc.) Is it common to feel ideologically separate? I’ve always heard that there are a good number of different opinions at BYU, but I never seem to encounter anyone who breaks out of the mold.

Sincerely,
Not Even #FeelTheBern Sympathizer But Feeling Singled Out

A:

Dear #SingledOut,

Well the good news is, you're not left of everyone on the Board. I mean, you're probably left of some of us, but not all of us. 

But I do know what you mean. I don't think of myself as all that extreme, but I often feel like the most liberal person in the room. It can be frustrating, and it's easy to feel like you're the only one here who's not uber-conservative. I think all the very conservative people at BYU tend to believe that everyone on campus agrees with them, so they feel more comfortable voicing their opinions on certain subjects, whereas people whose political beliefs don't fit the perceived norm tend to stay more silent because they think no one will agree with them.

Personally, I've found the most success in finding like-minded people when I speak up about a more "liberal" topic when it comes up. I don't go around broadcasting my views from the tops of buildings all the time, but when there are organic ways to bring up my "unorthodox" political beliefs, I take them. So if there's a class discussion on a subject I'm passionate about, I'll make a comment. If there's a news story I'm really interested in, I'll tell my friends or roommates about it. If someone says something that I think is simplistic or ignorant, I'll call them out in a respectful way. And whenever I do things like that, I find people who agree with me. Really, the best way I've found like-minded people is when one of us has had the courage to say something the other person wanted to say but was too scared to. So going back to the article you had to read, did you say anything about in in your SFL class? It's entirely possible that other people in your class were feeling the same way you were, but no one said anything about it.

And in general, I think it's good practice to have deep conversations about important topics with people. You don't have to agree with them to respect their opinion, and it broadens your own worldview when you hear about someone else's. Having open and respectful political conversations with a variety of people will probably help you realize that you already know people from all over the political spectrum. And obviously not everyone at BYU even has political opinions, but I'm always surprised by how many of them do.

-Alta

A:

Dear you,

I think BYU makes a sort of negative feedback loop when it comes to talking about liberal ideas. We all assume that everyone else is extremely conservative, we're afraid of being branded as an outsider or heretic or radical if we speak our true feelings, thus very few people share their liberal beliefs, which just perpetuates the idea that everyone is extremely conservative. I've found that when I do share my liberal thoughts, people either respond with understanding (but not necessarily agreement) or wholehearted agreement (which leads into long discussions about said thoughts). I had the most incredible half-hour discussion with a classmate during a study group after she made a comment about supporting equal rights. If she hadn't spoken up, we never would have learned we shared the same beliefs.

If you have time, I highly suggest taking Introduction to Women's Studies. It's a fantastic class, and you'll meet wonderful people who will most likely share your beliefs. Get involved in clubs, on and off BYU campus. Speak up in your classes for your ideals. But first and foremost, be open with your friends, because you never know which of them are feeling ideologically separate as well.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear you,

Babalugats makes a good point below. That is, there are plenty of different types of people in Provo, you just have to look for them. I'm not sure how I managed it, but I have friends with a broad variety of ideological viewpoints. Even outside the Board (which, as Alta pointed out, is one of the more liberal spaces at BYU), I have friends who are libertarian like me, friends who supported Clinton for president last year (and not in a "anyone would be better than Trump" way), a few typical conservative Mormon friends, and quite a few in between. From what I've been able to tell, certain majors tend to attract people with certain ideologies, while other fields of study tend to bring in a more balanced group. Aside from the people in my own major, I have friends who are studying English, civil engineering, linguistics, psychology, math, and computer science. They're all really cool, and I met them all in my ward.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear Singled Out,

The Parable of the Two Travelers:

A man entered a village and went to the monastery on the edge of town, where he was welcomed by an old monk, the wise man of the village. The visitor said, “I am deciding whether I should move here or not. I’m wondering what kind of neighborhood this is. Can you tell me about the people here?”

The old monk said, “Tell me what kind of people lived where you came from.” The visitor said, “Oh, they were highway robbers, cheats and liars.” The monk said, “You know, those are exactly the same kinds of people who live here.” The visitor left the village and never came back.

Half an hour later, another man entered the village. He sought out the wise old man and said, “I’m thinking of moving here. Can you tell me what kind of people live here?” Again the monk said, “Tell me what kind of people lived where you came from.” The visitor said, “Oh, they were the kindest, gentlest, most compassionate, most loving people. I shall miss them terribly. The old monk said, “Those are exactly the kinds of people who live here, too.”

Your perception becomes your reality if you let it. The Provo Bubble isn't real. Sure minority/majority is real. But if you're proactive you will absolutely find your people. Find a club that promotes a social issue you care about. Volunteer somewhere. Holy goodness BYU students could definitely afford to volunteer somewhere OFF CAMPUS. Heaven forbid we interact with the non-members and impoverished of our town. 

Sorry. I will get off my soapbox now and break it down so it stores properly. It's just when people complain about the homogenous culture at BYU but do nothing to get out into the city it makes me want to throw things. You're not necessarily doing that but maybe I am a little tilted over here. 

Babalugats

P.S I collected this old folktale somewhere on my mission so I don't have a good source. Sorry about that there.

A:

Dear Not Even,

If you want to read a fantastic talk by Elder Oaks on academic freedom and BYU, you can find it here. He said that even though faculty are required to avoid expression that seriously and adversely affects the mission of the church, we promote free speech, sharing ideas, and the search of real truth such that "academic freedom at BYU exceeds that at many colleges and universities that pretend to have unqualified academic freedom."

What does that have to do with politics? The church is non-partisan. Even though the culture in Utah is fairly Republican, the Church doesn't take sides. There's very little administrative pressure on the faculty to be conservative, or liberal, or whatever. I feel that is a contrast from many schools, where the pressure to teach liberal ideas is very high. BYU is not always ideal, but when it's working right, there can be an open discussion of a wide array of ideas, which is becoming more and more unique in this world.

Yes, the culture is quite conservative. But after a few years here, I feel like I'm actually more liberal than I was, and I feel it's because of BYU. Yeah, we're mostly all Mormon, but we're also all college students, which are usually a liberal bunch. Hopefully you can find some people who are open to listening to your ideas. Hopefully you can become comfortable with people who politely disagree with you. Hopefully you don't have too many run-ins with impolite people.

Best of luck!

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #90655 posted on 11/20/2017 7:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How often does BYU football win the coin toss? Because it seems like an awful lot...

-not a fair weather fan

A:

Dear Wind Blowing Device,

I searched the best I could on various sports websites, and video recordings to find the coin toss results. I was able to find 9 out of 11. If any readers know the results of the other 2 games please leave a correction. Without further ado BYU's coin toss record: 

  • Portland State Win
  • LSU Win
  • Utah Win
  • Wisconsin Loss
  • Utah State  ?
  • Boise State Win
  • Mississippi State Loss
  • ECU Loss
  • Fresno State Loss
  • San Jose State ?
  • UNLV Win

Depending on the results of the games I couldn't find the results for that would put BYU's coin toss record between 5-4 and 7-2. That's not terribly impressive, but it is higher than 50%, and much higher than the 3-8 record in actual football games this year.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear fair weather,

Hey now, no need to suggest that they're cheating at the coin toss. Let them have their little victories... coin tosses may be the only thing they know how to win these days.

-Van Goff


0 Corrections
Question #90665 posted on 11/20/2017 7:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did Craig's Cuts raise their prices? I think on discount days the cost of a cut was $8. Is it still that price?

-Tangled

A:

Dear Tangled,

I'm pretty sure I remember the discount day price being $5, but that was several years ago; it has risen a few times since then. The discount day prince is currently $9.99.

-The Entomophagist


0 Corrections
Question #90666 posted on 11/20/2017 7:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where on campus can I find a baby grand/grand piano...Or at least one that doesn't sound very out-of-tune? I'm not a music major, so I would feel out of place at the HFAC. But I'm also not attention-seeking (in fact, I really don't like playing with others watching), so the ones in the WILK probably would not work. I would say teaching myself how to play is a newfound hobby, but I don't know where I can practice without others listening.

-Not Billy Joel

A:

Dear Piano Man,

You don't need to be a music major to practice in the HFAC, you just need to practice at weird hours when the music majors aren't there. I've used the pianos there most frequently in the summer, when it seems like they're all available all the time, but I've also found available pianos in the evening and on weekends.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear NBJ,

I second Ento's response. The second floor of the HFAC is full of pianos meant to be practiced. There's several grands on the west side of that floor, and if you go to the tunnel at the north side of that floor, there's a set of about 10 small rooms each with an upright piano. You can almost always find a free upright after 5:00 pm, and sometimes even a free grand.

Music majors can schedule those rooms. But according to the rules, they can only kick you out from the start of each hour to 15 minutes after each hour. From 15 after until the end of the hour, the room is yours if you're in it. And if someone ever needs your room, people are really polite about it.

Also, room C-485 in the HFAC has 20 digital pianos (with headphones) you could practice on. There are classes sometimes in there, but I think there's a schedule outside where you can see when the open hours are.

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #90597 posted on 11/20/2017 7:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you ever liked anything before it was cool?

-Lame-O

A:

Dear You,

I’m usually one of the last people to like something. I start getting into something when it’s still super mainstream, and my enthusiasm normally extends awkwardly past its popularity. I didn’t start reading Harry Potter until a month before the 7th book came out, and I saw the first Captain America movie a few months ago. Basically, I’m like way uncool. 

I have liked one thing before it was cool though. I did a report on Alexander Hamilton in 8th grade and I listened to Lin Manuel Miranda’s performance at the White House and thought it was legit. I liked Hamilton (the one song that existed at the time) six years before it hit Broadway, so I guess you could say I'm pretty hipster.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Coolio,

I mostly like music and books before they become cool. For example, I loved The National Parks before everyone and their dog in Provo was listening to them at rooftop concerts and fangirling over them (partially because their manager was in my ward, and their van was parked in front of my apartment complex for several months). I also read The Hunger Games and Twilight before they caught on in mainstream culture. Come to think of it, any time a somewhat obscure book is made into a wildly popular movie, I've probably read the book long beforehand, and obnoxiously roll my eyes throughout the entire movie, if I even bother to see it (I've still only seen one of the Twilight movies and one of the Hunger Games movies). 

-Alta

A:

Dear (F)LameO (My Good Hotman),

I'm going to go ahead and say Stranger Things. My sister told everyone in my family to watch it within the first week of its coming out. Though it definitely had a presence on the internet by the time I finished (though not nearly as big as it would come to have), it took at least another week or so before people 'round these parts started getting excited about it. It felt pretty cool to be ahead of the curve for once, since usually I discover cool things so late that I think of myself as some sort of reverse-Hipster.

-Frère Rubik

P.S. My sister is generally good at discovering cool things before they are mainstream, especially music.

A:

Dear you,

I liked Twilight before anyone knew about it, though I'm not sure if that's something I should be proud of. My enthusiasm in the book waned as it became popular (it was good, but it wasn't that good) and as my friends, who had ignored all my suggestions to read it the year before, became screaming Edward fans.

Like Tipperary, I also loved Alexander Hamilton before Hamilton took us all by storm. I grew up hearing stories about the American founders (I think my dad was conditioning me to be a political science major since my birth), and was awed and saddened by Hamilton's life (my dad didn't leave out the parts about the Reynolds affair). We were so excited by Lin Manuel Miranda's White House performance, but gave up hope after several years went by and we hadn't heard anything more. I was shocked, elated, and depressed to hear Hamilton was being performed on Broadway, because those darn mission rules wouldn't let me listen to the soundtrack. It was over half a year after its release that I finally got to listen to it.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Lame,

The first thing that comes to mind is Doctor Who. I really liked the show while still in elementary school, when hardly anyone knew what it was. Then, as it got more and more popular, and people starting creating fandoms on Facebook for it, I grew to like it decidedly less. In fact, the more prominently a thing is featured in pop culture, the less likely I am to like it. 

Another example I can think of is Captain America. I went to the midnight premiere of the first movie, and immediately loved it. Somewhat surprisingly given my track record, I still like Captain America.

~Anathema

A:

Dear you,

As an avid reader, I was a fan of Harry Potter, Twilight, and The Hunger Games before any of them got super popular. It's maybe a stretch to describe Twilight as "cool," but I take some consolation in the fact that I read it before the hordes of tweens got ahold of it.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear you,

Blind Pilot. Israel Nebeker's uncle was in my home ward growing up. He bought my best friend a copy of their first album and wanted to set them up on a date. Proudest moment of my life is when, three years later, my music role-model older brother was like "You gotta check out Blind Pilot, they're so good." and I already basically had 3 Rounds and a Sound (the whole album) memorized. 

I guess the Avett Brothers. I've been listening to them almost religiously since I was fourteen, when tickets were $15 but I was still too young to do anything about it. I've always dressed like it was the 90s, so I guess I'm lucky that's back now.

Is Kishi Bashi officially "cool" yet? A lot of people don't know them but they have way more albums than when I started listening. I hope they are.  

Isn't it interesting how we value this concept? not everyone does, but it is hard not to feel a little proud of yourself. I always thought it was nice just because it's a little bit of proof that your likes are not dictated by the world around you. It's nice to have a few things that you just objectively like and you can trust that. 

Babalugats

A:

Dear Same-O,

The first things that came to my head were Zedd, the electronic artist, and The Strike, a local Utah band. The Strike is less of an exciting example because they're not nearly as famous, but I followed Zedd way before he was as famous as he is now, before he had anything but some videos on YouTube.

That's pretty much all I can think of now, there's probably not much more.

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave

A:

Dear LO,

Like Tipperary, I am usually one of the last people to jump onto popular trends. However, within my family I was definitely a trendsetter. For example, back in 2005 I really wanted an iPod. I had a newspaper delivery route and was willing to save the money to buy it myself. I still remember my dad telling me that iPod's were dumb and would never catch on. He said I should buy myself a portable CD player instead. I decided to buy an iPod anyways. That Christmas my parents both got iPod's for themselves.

Ms. Mitty, however, has a knack for enjoying popular music artists before they become mainstream. Some examples include 21 Pilots, Sam Smith, and Of Monsters and Men. Many of my musical choices are now inspired by her precognitive abilities. 

-Mitty

A:

Dear friend,

Usually, I like things that never become cool but my dad has bizarrely good musical taste and often discovers music before it becomes popular. He's the one who introduced me to Twenty One Pilots back in 2012 when they were just some band that even the alternative radio stations thought was too weird to play. A little earlier than that, he also gave me the heads up about some indie band from Provo that he thought was going to really pick up in popularity. At the time, I was like "hah Provo, good one, Dad..." but by 2017, I think it's safe to say that Imagine Dragons has made quite the name for themselves. I've no idea how he finds the bands or somehow predicts their popularity, but it's a talent for sure.

The only credit I've got to my name is Vance Joy, when I heard "Riptide" on a college radio and thought it sounded nice. I told my mom to look it up and she humored me but didn't seem to be listening. Then, several months later when the alternative radio station and then the Top 40 picked it up, she told me to look up a song she had heard on the radio called "Riptide" because she really loved it. And that experience about sums up the relationship dynamic I have with my mom (kidding).

This band/singer was his most recent prediction and once again, seems to hold up.

-Van Goff

A:

Dear you,

I liked myself before I was cool. What's that? I'm actually not cool? Oh well...I guess the answer is no.

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #90566 posted on 11/20/2017 7:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Board Question #27195 is now over 10 years old and we have had quite the elections. Any new thoughts, speculation, or debate on the matter of a "None of the Above" option on ballots and the plausible effects?

-Corsica S.
(Bonus points if you contact Horatio for their current opinion)

A:

Dear Corsica,

I mean, in a way Gary Johnson and Evan McMullin were sort of like "None of the Above" in the latest election. Their closest chance of winning was if they managed to swing enough states to force Congress to choose the president, and even then it's doubtful that Congress would have chosen either of them. So their greatest hope for winning was tenuous at best, but they still garnered a lot of support. Why? Because they weren't Donald Trump, and they weren't Hillary Clinton. They were "none of the above." And if we're talking about their plausible effect on the election, I know a lot of people who blamed Gary Johnson for Hillary's loss, saying that if he hadn't pulled votes away from her, she would have won. However, that's probably not an accurate statement, at least according to the data. If anything, Johnson took away votes from Trump.

And here's my message to the general public: Personally I don't think voting for "none of the above," or for a random third-party candidate, is a very effective strategy if you actually want to effect any sort of political change. I get that there are probably very few political candidates who accurately represent all of your political views (using the general "your" here), but probably that's because no one person will ever match up 100% with another person when it comes to political views. If you want to vote for a third-party candidate, or "none of the above," or write in a name for moral or ethical or political reasons, go for it. That's your prerogative, and I won't judge you for it in the slightest if you have a good reason for doing it. But don't expect to see any real change happen because of that. You may not like it, but that's the way the American political structure was made, and the best way to enact change is voting for a candidate from one of the major parties who you mostly agree with. And if you dislike the candidates we have, be more active in local and primary elections. I wish I didn't have such a cynical view of the success of not-major-party candidates, but in the vast majority of cases, that's how American elections work.

-Alta


0 Corrections
Sunday, November 19, 2017
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did any of you see David Axelrod's forum address today? Wanna summarize it for me or give me a taste of the highlights? I know they don't usually rebroadcast high-level visitors like this, and I'm kicking myself for missing it...

-Just yer average Joe

A:

Dear Joe,

I didn't go, but there are some great summaries herehere, and here. It looks like it was a fantastic forum address; I wish I had gone as well!

-guppy of doom


0 Corrections
Posted on 11/19/2017 8:56 a.m. New Correction on: #90649 Has anyone renewed their Utah DL recently? How long did it take you to get it ...