Oh, there he goes off to his room to write that hit song "Alone in my principles."
Question #91815 posted on 11/19/2018 12:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do most masculine manly men end up with feminine girly girls?

-Broey

A:

Dear Bro,

I don't know where to get any data on this, so any answer I could give you would be speculation. It seems to be a common trope that this is true, but personally I'm skeptical as to how wide spread it actually is. Also, this depends heavily on how you define masculinity and femininity. Like, if you think it's super manly to live out in the mountains, scaling cliffs, then my guess would be that a guy like that would end up with a girl who loves those same kinds of activities. And if a girl who loves living out in the mountains doesn't sound super girly and feminine to you, then the answer to your question is no. 

But this brings up another point: is masculinity and femininity defined by what we do or who we are? Personally, I think it's the latter because honestly, I don't think that activities are inherently masculine or feminine. There are definitely social constructs that cause us to associate different activities with different genders, but that's ultimately dependent on culture and not the activities themselves. However, defining masculinity and femininity to be based on who we are raises the question as to what aspects of our personality/character/being actually make us masculine and feminine. While this is something I've thought about a lot, I haven't come to any solid conclusions. The most I can say is that there are times where I seem to instinctively sense masculinity and femininity, but it's the same way that I seem to sense beauty: I seem to just inherently know what it is, but can't wrap any words around it.

Anyways, none of this answers your question, but you're welcome for bringing up more questions.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Broey, 

While perfect statistical data doesn't exist to answer your question (because there is no real way to measure masculinity and femininity,) I can tell you that there have been lots of sociological studies done about marriages and relationships between people with different gender role ideologies. In fact, right now I'm working on designing a study about marriage satisfaction in connection with gender role expectations. 

The two big patterns I've learned from my readings: 

1) Women who have a more egalitarian view on gender roles are generally less happy when they are in relationships with men who have more traditional views 

2) Couples who share views on how gender roles ought to be in their relationship are happier because their viewpoints are more harmonious.

Now, what I can't tell you is that "manly" men always end up with "girly" girls. Why? Because I don't think there is actually a trend. Maybe there was in the past because anything but traditional gender ideologies was frowned upon... so nearly everyone that got married followed the 'manly men' - 'girly girl' stereotype. But times are a-changin' and new wave feminism, gender politics, and individualism have transformed the way we think about personal identity, which in turn drastically changes how we understand relationships. So in 10-20 years, I highly doubt that the trend will exist anymore -- if it even exists currently. 

That being said, people with more compatible gender ideologies are more likely to be in long-term relationships and be happier in those relationships because they agree on the division of labor and responsibilities within the relationship. So maybe 'traditionally masculine' men with traditional gender ideologies probably are more likely to end up in long-term relationships with 'traditionally feminine' women and vice versa. The relationships where people aren't fighting over their roles are probably going to last longer. 

Summarized, I don't think it's fair to say manly men end up with girly girls, but I do believe that people who share gender ideologies are more likely to gravitate towards each other in relationships. This can mean that girly girls and manly men end up with each other, but only if they also believe in 'traditional' gender roles that fit the characteristics of the other person. 

And of course, as with all sociological data, this is a general trend and agency of all people still exists and people can love whomever they choose. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse 


0 Corrections
Sunday, November 18, 2018
Question #91834 posted on 11/18/2018 9:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your thoughts on "Designer Babies"? Basically, it's the idea that in the near future, couples will be able to genetically modify their babies to give them attractive features, eliminate genetic diseases, and grant them other desirable traits.

Do you think it tampers with fate, or messes with things man ought not to mess with? Or is it a useful tool to potentially improve the lives of many?

-I. Asimov

A:

Dear you,

First, I think it's important to clarify what you mean by designer babies: you say couples will genetically modify their babies. That's something I haven't really heard about before, and I think it presents an overlapping but distinct set of moral quandaries from those presented by couples being able to genetically select among embryos to determine which one will become their baby. 

Genetic modification actually bothers me less, at least when it comes to legitimate medically-based interventions (rather than purely aesthetic ones). Genetically modifying someone for visual purposes seems like something that would frequently be done for vain or shallow reasons (although there could, of course, be exceptions to this), and I don't think that excessive focus on making your baby the prettiest baby there's ever been is terribly healthy for parent or child. 

However, I'm more concerned by the possibility of genetic selection, because that, to me seems to bring humanity closer to trying to replace Heavenly Father's role (and trying to determine who comes into our family and, perhaps more importantly, who does not) rather than simply trying to do the best we can for the people who come to our family. I would worry about different ways that such processes could disrespect the power God has given us to procreate, I guess, but I don't have a lot of knowledge about this area to back up my gut concerns.

Note: There are also eugenics concerns here.

So there's a few thoughts from me.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear you,

GATTACA has all the answers.

(But seriously it's a fantastic movie. Go watch it.)

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear you,

Don't flaunt your little last-season Prada baby at me, honey.

Saucily,

--Ardilla-ly Blonde


0 Corrections
Question #91842 posted on 11/18/2018 2 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board

What is it like to date at Byu in 2018?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear you,

I have no idea.

~Anathema, who is a single undergrad at BYU 

A:

Dear friend, 

I'm terrified to ever find out. From what I can surmise from meme pages, not good. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse - who has only ever seriously dated one person and is very grateful for that.

A:

Dear you,

Honestly, as much fun as making fun of dating at BYU is, there are aspects about dating at BYU that are really positive. Sometimes dating at BYU can be awkward or weird; and there are some people out there that are just bizzare/and or terrible, but there's a lot of great things about the dating scene. Here are a few:

  • Quantity of Social Interactions: Dating is a lot easier when you around other people and talk to them (citation needed). This seems really obvious, but people who are living at home and working might only interact with a few co-workers everyday. As a full-time student at BYU you're in at least 4 classes, you have people in your apartment, other people in your ward, and that's just the bare minimum. Even if you're anti-social or in a committed relationship with your school work, you're probably meeting a lot of people. This isn't even counting FHE groups, clubs, parties etc.
  • Quantity of Activities: Dating requires people and an activity. It's hard to ask people out on dates when there aren't fun, cheap things to do. There are so many things to do in Provo. BYU has a dollar theatre, cheap concerts, sporting events, museums, is close to all sorts of outdoor activities, and if that still isn't enough there's like a gazillion and a half events on Facebook every weekend. There really isn't an excuse for having nothing to do. If anything, Hulu + Spotify is only $6 a month as a student so what more could you want? (Fun fact: There is literally nothing to do in Rexburg, which is why so many BYU Idaho students get married straight-up boredom).
  • Interesting, Attractive People: College is a place filled with people who like to learn and are investing in their future. People have so many different interests, hobbies, and cultural backgrounds. You have to be pretty smart to get in, and BYU students are good-looking. Plus, there are 30,000+ undergrads at BYU and another 30,000+ at UVU. There are so many amazing people that there's bound to be plenty of people out there that you would be interested in (that hopefully would be interested in you as well).
  • People Living Gospel Standards: For many members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, there wasn't a very big dating pool of people who shared their religious beliefs growing up. That's not to say that there weren't people with positive standards, but BYU is a place where everyone has agreed to live the Honor Code. There are still jerks, and sadly there's still sexual assault that goes on, but just living in a place where most people are trying to live a clean life, treat others in a Christlike manner, and don't drink alcohol does wonders toward creating a positive and safe environment.
  • People are Open to Dating: In my experience, BYU is a great atmosphere for asking people out on dates. In a lot places and situations, asking someone out might seem really serious, but I think the casual low-commitment first date is still alive and well at BYU. I think most single people are generally open to going on at least one date if you get up the courage to ask. I can't guarantee you everyone will say yes, or that you'll get any second dates, but in general I think BYU is a pretty chill place where it's pretty easy to get a date.
  • Multiple Levels of Seriousness: At some places, it's really hard to find people that are looking for a serious relationship, and at other places it's hard to find people that are looking for anything but eternal marriage (*cough BYU-Idaho *cough). I think BYU is unique that it covers the whole spectrum. If you aren't looking for anything serious and you just want to go ice skating or watch a movie there are plenty of people on the same boat. If you're looking for your eternal companion you can do that too. Whatever your current mood is there's a place for you in Provo. 
My personal experience at BYU has been pretty good. I've had some terribly awkward dates, I've had some rejections, and I've had a lot of first dates that haven't lead to second dates. But I've got some great stories, and even all those dates that didn't turn out that well were still pretty fun (especially if we got ice cream). The dating scene in Provo isn't perfect, but it's fun and there are plenty of people willing to go on dates. Provo might not be your cup of tea, but I think compared to other places, it's pretty good gosh dang it.

Peace,
Tipperary
(Defending the Provo dating scene because he's from Rexburg. At the very least Provo ain't Rexburg)
A:

Dear you,

FLORIDA KIDDO, IS THAT YOU?

Thanks for reminding me of one of my favorite board questions ever.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Corrections