"I always suspected that the University police were loyal to the Crown!" -Katya
Thursday, January 16, 2020
Question #92863 posted on 01/16/2020 8:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

While I should know by now, I am never certain how to act/what to do when a repairman is in my house. Do I stay in the same room while trying to avoid hovering and interfering with his work? Do I try to do something productive but interruptable in another room e.g. folding laundry? Do I just put on Netflix or some computer game? Am I totally overthinking this?

-Adulting is Hard

A:

Dear you,

You're definitely overthinking. They don't really care what you do as long as you don't interfere with their work, or do something inappropriate. I'm the type of person that likes to know what the problem is and what they are going to do to fix it, so I tend to stick around and ask questions and watch what they are doing. I have this idea that maybe if I pay enough attention I can fix the problem the next time around.

That's just me, but you could go in a different room, or leave the house altogether (although I wouldn't advise that for security reasons). Whatever you do, make sure to let them know how they can contact you in case they have questions, need to show you something, or finish and are ready to receive payment.

I hope that helps!

-Sunday Night Banter

P.S. I think your overthinking is making adulting harder than it needs to be. Just relax a little and don't worry if you don't have everything figured out because neither do the rest of us.

A:

Dear you,

From my experiences with repair men, they are used to awkward tenants (like myself), and so don't seem to mind if I'm hovering to see what they're doing (like the third time I put in a request to fix my toilet--I wanted to make sure something was getting done), or if I'm off quietly in another room to myself.

~Anathema

A:

Dear adulting,

There was once a time our landlord warned us that a repairman would be going to each of our apartments to replace the batteries in our smoke detectors. So I did what any other rational 24 year old would do in my situation - once I heard the repairman knock, I hid in the bathroom. We got our batteries replaced and I didn't have to worry about what to do while he was there. Win win.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Adulter,

Carl is the oddball and his Tongan etiquette will come out and start offering him water and food from our fridge in case they're hungry. They've all declined the food, but sometimes they'll accept the water. Ever since we moved we've had this 'free box' with things that DI wouldn't take (or want).

Examples: Brand new neon green shoelaces, a box of cake mix we weren't interested in, a large DFCU water bottle, strawberry daiquiri drink mixer, mini lotions I received but never used, a never worn green scarf from my 2013 Daphne Halloween costume, milk chocolate candy we had (I don't find chocolate to be worth the lactase pills if they aren't filled with caramel, peanut butter, etc.), and who knows what else.

Carl wants to ask them to go through the box and take anything they find interesting. I find this to be embarrassing. Thankfully, I've convinced him not to do that.

We've also been upgrading our furniture to prepare our nursery and many people have come by. He will also want to offer that free stuff to potential buyers. We had someone who bought our small dresser almost take our 4 foot Christmas tree! But his wife said no.

But when it comes to me and repairmen? I just sit on the couch surfing the Internet on my laptop. That way if they need to talk to me I'm available, but I can also just be an introvert and make minimal conversation if need be.

-Goldie Rose


0 Corrections
Wednesday, January 15, 2020
Question #92803 posted on 01/15/2020 4:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there any way for me to see exactly what President Trump and President Obama have done and have tried to do in office? Like, I'd love to just have a list of policies each of them has done or has tried to push through congress. I hear about what they supposedly have wanted to do, and the horrible things they both supposedly have done, and the terrible things they wanted to but were stopped by congress or red tape, etc. But I know that so much of what happens during someone's time as president, whether good or bad, often has a lot to do with the presidents and policies before them. And I feel like a good way to get to know a president is to see what they've actually DONE.

So of course a neat list with every major policy they personally supported or tried to push through, complete with links to relevant source material, would be ideal. But since that might not be reasonable, whatever is the next closest thing would still be very helpful.

Thank you!

-Trying to be more informed

A:

Dear informed, 

Good for you! It's important to be an informed civic participant. Regardless of whether you take a side or land in the middle, intentional research about policy is crucial, and admirable. 

This question has been held over far longer than it deserved to, so I hope by now you have perhaps done a bit of your own looking and found some information to suit your fancy. However, I also did some looking. Unfortunately, like you predicted there are not a lot of super clean cut, line by line comparisons because.... well, it would take a lot of work. Which is why I didn't create one here either. 

I did find some decent websites. I tried my best to read some that took a non-partisan approach, and the best one I found was this article from The Balance. It mostly covers their economic policy, and I think it does a decent job of pointing out what direction both Trump and Obama took things. What is important to understand about the budget, of course, is that technically the president doesn't control it. Congress does. It's also important to keep context in mind, which this article does. Obama had to work under the pressure of a recession, Trump does not. 

Josefina also included this link to a New York Times interactive article. Personally, I thought it was pretty good. At the end of the interactive bit, it includes comparison by showing some key policies that Trump has reversed since the Obama era. 

This Washington Post article does a good job of showing nuance and pointing out context that may influence trends as well. It doesn't cover a vast expanse of policies, but certainly includes enough... and shows some of the outcomes of various policies that Trump in particular has advocated for. I should note that this one mentions that less families are on Food Stamps under Trump, but doesn't explain that that largely has to do with cutting social safety net programs. (i.e., if you make it harder to get Food Stamps, of COURSE the number of people on Food Stamps goes down.) 

The other thing that article points out that I think is incredibly important to think about is that while presidents do have some sway on outcomes, they don't control the world. Despite what it seems, life continues before, after, and through different presidential terms. Trends continue, and while they can certainly be shaped by presidential policies, are not dictated by them. Electing someone for the next 4 years is not going to drastically change the way things work. The economy dictates the way the president responds, the president doesn't control the economy. Democratic OR republican, we spend in deficit and are all trying to lower things like unemployment and poverty. And every president from either party has mixed success in every aspect. 

The best way to really get to know Trump and Obama and their policies by comparison is to read news articles yourself and make judgements about what you think is effective and not effective. Reading summaries, while helpful, allows other people to do your thinking for you. I hope what I provided here can help you just a little bit on your road to being more informed. For now, it will have to do because I think you deserve an answer, rather than waiting till the next election to get anything. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse


0 Corrections