Whenever he thought about it, he felt terrible. And so, at last, he came to a fateful decision. He decided not to think about it. ~John-Roger and Peter McWilliams
Question #4373 posted on 03/22/2004 12:01 a.m.
Q:

O mighty denizens of the 100 Hour Board,

Tonight at around 7 pm or so I noticed a very bright star high in the western sky. It appeared bright enough to be a planet, but it didn't look red enough to be Mars or yellowy enough to be Venus. It wasn't moving, so it couldn't be a satellite. Alas, my astronomy skills are lacking. Can one of you kind souls remedy my ignorance and tell me what that star-looking-thing is?

- pippin galadriel moonchild

A: Dear pippin galadriel moonchild,
I'm so proud that I know this one off the top of my head. It's Venus. I think it has a nickname of the "evening star" because it's often the first star to appear each night around sunset. Even though it's not a star. From my vantage point, however, it looks like one.

∞Link
A: Dear Peregrine,

Venus is also known as the morning star, because it does the same thing when you see it in the morning, providing it's in the right spot.

- Illuvatar