"I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells." - Dr. Seuss
Question #92318 posted on 06/16/2019 2 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you live where you were born/consider yourself to have grown up?

Why do you think that is?

Would you change it?

~TenSoon~

A:

Dear Tiffany,

Haha. Yes. I literally live next door to my childhood home. Because every time I have tried to leave Hometown, something inevitably brings me back, and now that I’m a ”real adult” (whatever than means), this happens to be where I found a job. 

While I don’t HATE it here, it’s not necessarily my favorite, either. Hubs and I have a new Dream, though, that will once again take us away for at least a few years. I don’t know where we will make a “permanent“ home, but I am looking forward to the next adventure!

-Az

A:

Dear TARDIS,

Honestly, I don't know. I lived most of my life in Minnesota, but my parents didn't, so it's hard to say that I felt like a true Minnesotan—even though I went to school in ballet flats in temperatures below freezing and at least six inches of snow.

I've lived in Utah for nearly seven years now, and it still doesn't feel like home. We're moving later this year, but I have no clue how long we'll stay there. Maybe we'll come back to Utah, and it will end up being home anyways.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear dog,

While where I live now isn't where I grew up, it is still in Utah. Honestly, I'll probably end up living my entire life in Utah. And I'm good with that, because this is where all my family is, and it's very important to me to stay physically close to family.

~Anathema

A:

Dear TS,

No. I spent the first eighteen years of my life in South Dakota (where my parents still live), but home for me is California now. We moved out here partly for my education and partly because my wife wanted to live somewhere without snow. We're staying here partly because my career prospects here are better than almost anywhere else in the country and partly because we love it here.

I was happy growing up in South Dakota, but I don't think I could move back. Apart from my parents, I have no family between Utah (most of my extended family) and the East Coast (my brother and sister). All but a few of my friends have moved out of state. Moving there would mean a significant pay cut and probably a career change as well. Plus, there's snow. My parents made South Dakota home despite neither of them having roots there; now my wife and I are doing the same in California.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear kandra,

No, and the idea of doing so seems foreign to me. Neither of my parents returned to their hometowns as adults, and I actually grew up in 4 different states, so it seems natural to move to where the work is. But I could see myself moving back to the last place I lived someday, assuming I can get a job there. I like where I live now, but I have a lot of family around there and no extended family here.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Tennyson,

Kind of? I was born while my parents were at BYU and I'm back at BYU. I also grew up in Utah and despite my family moving around a bit I'm still here.

Honestly, where I've lived my entire life has been a function of academic and career opportunties; first my parents' and now my own. 

I definitely don't want to live in Utah for the rest of my life. I love Utah, but there's so much out there in the world that it seems kinda absurd to limit myself to what's between Ogden and Provo. I would be totally okay living here for a few years, but not to stay forever.

Ideally, I'd like to spend some time living in Africa, South America, the Middle East, and India. I'd also love to try the South and the East Coast of the United States. Basically my ideal life would be to move around every few years or so.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Ben Ten, 

Yes. Provo baby, born and raised. I want to move after I graduate and not live in Utah for a very long time. However, I took a blood oath and it's written in code that I am lawful property of Provo City, and if I try to leave for more than 2 years, terrible curses will come upon me and They will drag me back here. My entire paternal family line has taken this oath, even sealed it with BYU Professorships. We cannot run from this place. The only way for me to make it out is to marry out of the oath... which has been my plan all along (mwahaha). 

Sure, I don't resent growing up in one place. I liked the stability of it. I always had my friends (who were also my wardies) and my life was pretty "delinquent-behavior" free due to the religious makeup of my high school. It was an easy life.  But presently, I feel a bit like Rapunzel in her tower:  "What is it like, out there where they [roam]? Now that I'm older... Mother might just let me go." I'd really like to meet the real world, outside of The Bubble. *looks longingly into the night* 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear TenSoon,

Yes, I live about 10 minutes away from the house I grew up in. My parents still live there. We live here because this is where we found a house we liked when we were house hunting a few years ago. I never thought I'd live so near to my parents, but let me tell you, now that I have kids it's realllly nice to have a close, trustworthy, and free babysitter. I don't think I'd move unless I had to, especially since house prices are insane right now. Part of me would love to experience life outside the Utah bubble, but the logical part of me knows that I hate change and I like how safe and kid-friendly it is here.

--Maven

A:

Dear Ten,

Nah. I was born and raised in Georgia but I live in Provo. I moved home after I graduated from BYU but then returned to Utah 8 months later. This is just where my life is now. 

Honestly I don't see myself staying in Utah too much longer. If I start grad school then it will be two, three more years here but after that I want to move somewhere where it doesn't snow.

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear TenSoon,

I was raised in Texas and I live in Texas, but Texas is a big place. I would never move back to where I was raised because there's no work for me there, but it's nice to be able to drive a couple hours to visit my parents instead of a couple days.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear Yosef,

Though I was born in Sandy, UT, I moved when I was 2 to Indiana so I feel like that's more hometown-y to me than anything else. At the same time, I haven't lived there in almost a decade so I don't think it would like home to go back. Still, I think there's a soft spot in my heart for the Midwest (and its low cost of living), so if there's an opportunity to live and work there we will probably take it. 

I don't think I want to be in one place forever, just because I grew up moving around, but I can see pros and cons to both sides. I've been in Utah for 6 years now and that feels too long to be in the bubble, but I've found some new social circles lately that make things feel less bubble-like, so I'm okay if things don't change for a while. 

Take care,

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you live where you were born/consider yourself to have grown up?

Fortunately, this is an easy answer because I don't live in any of the places I lived while growing up so I don't have to consider which of them counts the most.

Why do you think that is? 

Having moved around growing up means that I'm comfortable enough with going to whatever place (within reason) offers the right opportunities rather than just selecting from places I already know, so we moved to a new state because Man, C got a good job here and we're planning on generally following his career.

Would you change it?

Probably not. I have some sadness over the fact that I don't entirely feel like I have a "home" but it's also really nice to just feel like home is wherever I live with my family.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear ~~,

I grew up in Washington. Even though I haven't lived there in 8 years, I still consider it to be home. Maybe part of that is because my parents still live there, but either way it was a huge part of my upbringing.

I went where the job was, and that was Texas. With my education in a somewhat specialist field I didn't have that many choices. The job I got is wonderful, and it would be hard to see myself leaving. It's a little far from home, but two time zones and a direct flight away isn't really that bad. I tried three time zones away once and that was just too much.

Someday I'd like to move back to the West Coast, but for now I'm fine where I'm at.

-Kirito

A:

Dear person,

Do you live where you were born/consider yourself to have grown up?

Nope.

Why do you think that is? 

I don't really like living there. Visiting in July is fun but it's too cold. Also there are more opportunities elsewhere.

Would you change it?

Would I change where I grew up? No, I don't think so. 

-Sheebs

A:

Dear OreSeur ~

No. Why? Because I really love Utah, have more family here, and I really like living in a place with good internet and a short drive to almost any store I want. 

Would I change it? My hometown? No. It's charming as is, and I love being able to visit and let my kids run and play outside without worrying about them. Would I change not living there? Probably not. Living here not there is a conscious choice.

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear,

I do. After not getting the job I was practically promised was mine in Utah, I started applying again elsewhere, and applied to a couple of schools back in AZ mostly to tell my parents I had, but I didn't expect to get hired since all my references were in Utah. I got my first-choice AZ job, and I love my city's vibe and environment, and it's great to be by my family again, too. Hooray! ...Now I just need to branch out in the friends department, since it's significantly harder to make friends when I'm not a college student with a bunch of similarly-aged-and-situationed neighbors. 

-Uffish Thought

A:

Dear Ten,

I never moved when I was growing up, and my parents have lived in the same house for over thirty years, so I easily identify Portland, OR as my hometown. I don't live there now, but I would move back in a heartbeat. Half a heartbeat. The only thing stopping me is money. My plan is to go back to school for two years, start working, and then find jobs for the both of us back in the Northwest. This Oregonian heart of mine craves gray skies and 65-degree weather.

-Genuine Article