"I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells." - Dr. Seuss
Question #92968 posted on 03/21/2020 3:39 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do you do to make yourself feel better after a REALLY crappy day?

-A very tired Goldie Rose

A:

Dear golden Goldie,

I'm sorry you've had such a bad day. Bad days are the worst.

Depending on how crappy the day has been, I have two different methods of feeling better:

  • For an anxiety and stress filled day, I get outdoors. I go running or on a hike while blasting music in my ears. I try to exercise the anger and stress away until I can actually enjoy being outdoors and listening to music.
  • For a sad and depressing day, I first take a hot shower and sob the entire time. Afterwards I sit on my couch in my towel, eat chocolate, and watch a wholesome show (like The Great British Baking Show).

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Sad-ie Rose,

Here are some of my go-to things to do when sad:

  • Walks
  • Ice cream
  • Cuddling
  • Naps
  • Showers
Hopefully these help! You've got this!
 
-Tipperary
A:

Dear Goldie,

Chocolate milk, gourmet root beers, meditation, face masks, and taking a bath with a bath bomb.

But nothing can beat getting a really big hug while I vent all my frustrations.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Lovely, 

I am so sorry. Being a new mom must be so hard. I don't really know what I would do on a bad day in that situation, but here's what I do, in this order: 

1) Cry. It's the only thing that really works. If I have emotions built up, the only way I will feel better is if I cry them out. It's not going to fix everything, but it helps me clear my head just a little bit more. 

2) Treat Myself. Once I'm done clearing my emotions out with tears, I try to eat something. Pasta, Ice Cream, Mozzarella Sticks, an apple, etc.  

3) Distract Myself. Watching a show or playing a game or writing for the Board lets me clear my headspace while my emotions rebalance. It's nice to take a bit of a break so I can handle real life again. 

4) Talk to Pebble. When my emotions aren't completely controlling me, I try to talk about why I'm upset and stressed and find ways to make things better for the future. Sometimes, it's not even that. Sometimes just talking things out feels better in general. 

5) Make a list of stuff I'm grateful for. This helps me put things back in perspective and feel like maybe things are going to work out okay. 

Unfortunately, none of these things seem to be really helping with this whole stay at home, cancel your reception Coronavirus business. Guess I need more methods for coping with global disasters. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear Goldie,

I'm so sorry. Funnily enough, I've had a couple of those days since you asked this question, so now I'm really in tune with my routine.

Depending on the kind of crappy day, I'll do one of two things: 

  1. Most of the time, I'll try and think of a friend that I really feel like being around. A lot of the time, it's someone I'm really comfortable around and close to, but sometimes I just really miss someone I haven't seen for a while. I'll go to that friend and do whatever we feel like doing, whether it's just sitting around and doing homework together, going for a walk, going out to eat, watching a movie/cuddling, or something else.
  2. Sometimes I just need to be alone, in which case, my routine usually goes something like this: Sleep, wake up to find myself really good food, watch a show while consuming said food, take a really long shower, go back to sleep. Crying usually fits somewhere in there, too, but the placement varies. I usually have a few shows and other pieces of media that are really... comfortable to me, for lack of a better word. Most of the time I'll default to those shows/books/games.

I'll also usually post to my spam account on Instagram to try and debrief and work out my thoughts from the day, which is the closest I ever come to proper journaling. Most of the time, my post ends up being a lot more positive than I anticipate - partially because writing things out helps me to confront both the positives and negatives of the situation, and partially because I'm aware that my close friends are going to see whatever I write, and that forces me to think about how they will respond to whatever I'm writing.

Hope you feel better!

Best,

Josefina

A:

Dear Goldie,

If I've had a truly monumentally awful day, I like to sort of numb myself by doing something mindless enough that I don't have to put tons of effort into it, but that requires just enough mental effort to keep me distracted. My methods of choice are playing sudoku or doing crosswords. Once I've managed to calm down and get my breathing back into sync (deep breaths in through the nose and out through the mouth), I listen to my go-to "feel better" songs--"Here Comes the Sun" and "Let it Be" by the Beatles while still practicing good calming breathing techniques. If I still need relaxation time, I really like taking a long hot bath while listening to relaxing music. And then, even though I never think it will, doing something productive like cleaning something or getting some work done usually helps me feel better, too.

You're an amazing human, Goldie! Raising a baby sounds like one of the hardest things imaginable, but I'm sure that you're doing a phenomenal job!

-Alta