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Question #93252 posted on 08/14/2020 9:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm renting a house for the first time. It has a large backyard, which is my responsibility to maintain. I currently have a hose and sprinkler setup, which takes about 2 hours to get my entire yard watered. I would love to put in an irrigation system to make this job easier, but I cannot afford to this year. I was thinking I might ask my landlord if they would reduce my rent temporarily if I did that, because it would save on water and future tenants could use the system as well. Is this the type of thing landlords would typically agree to reduce rent for?

I tried googling it, but every search I did came up with upgrades landlords could to so they could increase rent, or how to negotiate rent reduction by proving you can pay ahead and stay for a longer contract, which doesn't help me. So, what types of home improvements are more likely than others to get a rent reduction?

-Zwerg Zwei

A:

Dear Z,

Considering we're a pool of college students and recent grads, we don't really have experience with renting houses and home improvements. Unfortunately this means we can't offer you any tips outside of your Google research. If any readers know anything about this, please leave a correction.

~Anathema

posted on 08/15/2020 10:14 p.m.
This totally depends on your landlord.
My girlfriend was able to get her entire first month free and the next couple months reduced because of work she did on a house that had been run down by previous tenants.
However a lot of landlords will either say it was your decision to do it, so they aren’t paying for it.
I would definitely check with them before you do anything though... there is the occasional landlord that will actually charge you damages for an improvement, saying the property was altered without permission.
-Short Stuff