That man is the richest whose pleasures are the cheapest. - Henry David Thoreau
Question #27240 posted on 11/15/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Is there any relationship between Harold Reuben Clark and J. Reuben Clark?
-MAC

A: Dear MAC,
I haven't been able to find a Harold Reuben Clark anywhere. If you are referring to the H.R.C. of HRCB (Kennedy Center) fame, then you are really looking for Herald Rey Clark. Do you still want to know if he's related to J.R.C.?
-Bob the Tomato
Question #27239 posted on 11/15/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Is there anywhere in Orem to get the movies of a series of books called "Redwall?" If so where at, and which ones do they have?
-happy kid who likes chicken noodles with rice

A: Dear kid who is no longer happy,
As far as I have determined, there is no commercial place in Orem that offers the Redwall movies. That includes Orem Library, which might be expected to have that kind of movie. Are you sure these movies are even commercially available? I couldn't find them at amazon.com or in the Internet Movie Database or in a database of academic and public libraries across the U.S. I also looked at a few Redwall websites, including Brian Jacques' official site, and I saw no mention of these videos for sale. I did, however, discover how you can watch them if you live in Canada...but that is about it. Sorry.
-She Who Must Not Be Named
Question #27238 posted on 11/15/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
What is that horrible whining, moaning, and gnashing of teeth sound in the top classrooms of the MARB? It has been four years of torment. What is it!!!
--2 microbiology students on the verge of insanity (as if our major wouldn't push us there already)

A: Dear micro students,
I feel your pain. Although I am not a biology major, I have taken quite a few physics and zoology classes in those rooms. Believe it or not, that sound is actually the plumbing. It turns out there is a lot of plumbing in the walls and ceiling for heating and other purposes. When the pressure is just right, the water in the plumbing causes them to emit that awful screech as it flows through them. Good luck, with four years under your belt, you probably won't have to put up with the plumbing much longer...
--Knut the Great
Question #27237 posted on 11/15/2002 midnight
Q:

O knowledgable board,
I have noticed on several different zippers that I've owned over the years that the letters "YKK" appear. What does the acronym stand for (if it is, indeed, an acronym) and what greater meaning does it hold for us as human beings?
~XYwhat?

A: Dear XY what,
Here's a fun little challenge for you. Think of a company that makes shoes. Now think of a company that makes socks. Now one that makes pants. Now one that makes shirts. Easy, huh? In fact, there are probably several companies that make all of those items of clothing. Now think of a company that makes zippers. If you guessed YKK, you're right. But don't expect me to believe for one second that when you think zippers, you think YKK. Apparently YKK markets to zipper distributors, not to the end customer.

And it must work, because YKK is the world's largest zipper manufacturer. Founded in 1934 by Tadao Yoshida, YKK is a Japanese company. The acronym YKK comes from the name of the company, Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikikaisha, which means Yoshida Industries, Inc. Needless to say, that doesn't fit too well onto a zipper, nor does it roll right off the tongue. So YKK is the acronym of choice. I don't see too much deeper meaning in Yoshida Industries, Inc. Feel free to look for one. The company's philosophy is "No one prospers unless he renders benefit to others." And zippers certainly do render benefit to others. If you want, you can make that your deeper meaning.
--Othello
Question #27236 posted on 11/15/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Is the city of Enoch really in outer space as a result of molecular structure manipulation?
--Not a fan of counting stars

A: Dear Non-star counter,
The city of Enoch is no longer on this earth. Moses 7:23 explicitly states "Zion was taken up into heaven." Anything not on earth (or within its atmosphere, at least) is by definition in outer space. But is this the result of molecular structure manipulation? That's a fairly vague question. All of the city's molecular structures were moved, which could be considered manipulation. By the same token, walking involves molecular structure manipulation. Were any molecular structures changed? The scriptures don't tell us.
--Der Berliner
Question #27235 posted on 11/15/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
If hair is supposed to be dead, then how does the hair on your arm know to grow back if you cut it, but it doesn't grow the rest of the time?
--[Unsigned]

A: Dear Unsigned
Hair doesn't know that it's been cut. The growth cycle of body hair just fools you into thinking that. Each follicle generates a new strand of hair for a few days or weeks, and then stops. Follicles on different areas of the body have growth cycles of different lengths: arms and legs have much shorter growth cycles than the armpits or pubis, and head hair almost never stops. The length of the growth cycle also depends on your gender and other biological factors. This is why some guys can go a week without shaving and still be Honor-Code-approved, and others have to trim the carpet growing on their backs every few days.

Anyway, once the follicle ends its growth cycle, the hair just sits there for another few days or weeks, and then the follicle generates a new strand. The old hair falls out as the new one pushes it out of the way. The follicles' cycles are all offset so you don't have periods of intense shedding (like a cat or dog). You'll notice that if you shave your arms or legs, within a day or two you'll have stubble, but it won't be coming out of every pore; it will be coming out of only the pores that were in the growth cycle when you cut it. But eventually, every follicle will go back through into the growth cycle and you'll be hairy again.

And how does a follicle know if it's a head follicle or a left thigh follicle? It's most likely related to other mechanisms of cell specialization, which nobody fully understands.

By the way, the saying that hair grows back thicker when you cut it is just a myth. It appears this way because the ends of your hairs are normally nice and tapered (from the start of the growth cycle), and when you shave them, you chop off that nice tapered end and leave it with a sharp chunky end.
--Hirsute Harold