That man is the richest whose pleasures are the cheapest. - Henry David Thoreau
Question #27118 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
What is the name of the My Little Pony who is pink with a yellow lock of hair tied with a bow as a symbol and her tail can grow longer or shorter. She is also a Pegasus. ?? Are there other My Little Pony fanatics on campus?
--The Pony Queen

A: Dear Pony Queen,
The pony you've described is known as "Curly Locks," of the Brush ‘n Grow line. I am sure there are some other MLP fans on campus, but for some reason, they seem to be lying low...
--Tex
Question #27117 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
What happened to the regular movies at the Varsity theatre? I love the International Cinema but it was enjoyable having more of a diversity in film choice. Also, being able to watch such favorites as Princess Bride, Monty Python, and So I Married an Axe Murderer were also great events. And finally what about edited movies they once did like Last of the Mohicans.
-Film Fanatic

A: Dear Film Fanatic,
Way back when, the Varsity Theatre was a campus hot spot. Why? Because BYUshowed edited R-rated movies such as Last of the Mohicans on a regularbasis. After experiencing problems with movie powers-that-be who weren't sothrilled with the editing idea, BYU stopped showing Rs and turned to Gs andthe occasional PGs. And, of course, attendance plummeted and profits wentway down. For awhile, the Varsity stopped showing movies altogether, but then they started coming out with the occasional flick. Now, as you know, the IC has taken over the Varsity, probably to allow more classroom space in the SWKT as a result of the demolishment of the SFLC. Keep your eye out, though, every once in a while you might see a Princess Bride midnight movie tossed into the mix.
--Bob the Tomato
Question #27116 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Who was the architect of the Salt Lake Tabernacle?
--[Unsigned]

A: Dear Unsigned,
Henry Grow was the principle engineer on the building because of his experience with bridges. William Folsom designed the faux sandstone pillars. Truman O. Angell was involved many years later when they added the balcony for acoustic reasons.
--Larry-boy
Question #27115 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
After a discussion with one of my roommates, we came to the conclusion that in almost any state with two public university systems, the academic reputation of "X" State University is almost always lower that that of "X" University (i.e. Michigan/Michigan St., Oregon/Oregon St., UC-anywhere/UCS-anywhere, Florida/Florida St.). Is there any basis to this apparent trend and if so, what is that basis? If not, what are the exceptions or counterexamples?
--Der Greifswalder

A: Lieber Greifswalder,
You and your roommate seem to be on to something. Most "X" Universities are in fact superior in reputation to "X" State Universities. However, I did find a few exceptions (courtesy of U.S. News and World Report): Louisiana, South Dakota, West Virginia, and Indiana all have state universities ranked higher. A few states have the two schools ranked close together: Colorado, Iowa, and Ohio. However, speaking as a native Ohioan, I can confidently say that OSU has a better reputation than OU.

"X" Universities are often more research-oriented than "X" State Schools, which are usually more agrarian and down-home. There are quite a few "X" State Aggies (Utah, NM, etc.), but you won't find a U. of "X" Aggies team.
--She Who Must Not Be Named
Question #27113 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Why do you only give a serious response to simplistic questions, but anytime a real question is posed, involving real research (no, looking it up for 5 minutes on Google is not real), the crestfallen asker gets a lame and asinine response?
--Disenchanted 100-hour ex-fan

A: Dear Disenchanted,
We're sorry you feel that way. As Board members, we generally try our best to research a question and discover the answer for you. However, if your question is answered by someone who couldn't find a real answer or who perhaps was extremely busy at the time, you might unluckily get an answer that doesn't satisfy you. Hey, you get what you pay for.
--The Board
Question #27112 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I took Humanities 201 for the GE Civilizations requirement, but I don't want to take Humanities 202 for the second half. I heard somewhere that you can take any of the 202 courses, even if they are from different departments. However, I don't really know where I heard that. I would REALLY like to take English 202 for the second half. It that possible without running into prerequisite difficulties?
Thanks,
Lovely Rita Meter Maid

A: Dear Rita,

You heard right--there are no prerequisites for the History of Civilization classes. Because they're GE, they're meant for anyone to take. Feel free to take whichever 202 you want. However, you do want to make sure that your major or minor doesn't require a specific History of Civ. For instance, my European Studies minor required me to take either Humanities or History 201/202. I had already taken ClCv 201, but I still had to take Hum 201 in order to meet my minor requirements.

—She Who Must Not Be Named
Question #27111 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Why is the BYU football team not good this year? Oh, why doesn't BYU get into a real conference and play real teams? If the coaches worked on the players as much as the schools works on their training facilities, do you think the team would be winning?
--Curious

A: Dear Curious,
I don't think I'll touch the matter of the training facilities; that's another matter entirely. First of all, the BYU football team isn't bad this year. They had a better season last year, but this doesn't say that they are bad this year. Every team and every game is different. Some of the difficulties the team has had are evident: the quarterback switch-around, for example. As far as conferences go, BYU just got into the Mountain West Conference a couple of years ago, and they're probably not going anywhere else anytime soon. But only time will tell. BYU football has always been the source of controversy--just ask any BYU fan about the bowl game situation.
--Benvolio
A: Dear Curious,
BYU has a bad team this year for several reasons. 1) Brett Engemann. 2) We don't have a great O-line or running backs. 3) See reason #1. I also hate the BCS, so although it's not applicable I would like to blame them for all of our problems, including #1. We can't get into another conference because all the other conferences play on Sunday (Bball) so we won't join those conferences.
--The Captain.
A: Dear Little Trinkets,
Are you kidding?!? The football team KICKS!!! Girls are headed to the finals and all that. Oh wait . . . you mean American football; gotcha. Three words: Lavell, Edwards, Bye-bye. Or is that four words? Huh. You mean to say that Colorado State and Air Force aren't real teams? And lastly, let's not forget: How do you know how hard the coach is working. To me it looks like Crowton is sweating his gluteus off.
--The Scot
A: Dear Curious,
Whoa, who said the football team is not as good this year? Just because they've won fewer games doesn't mean they're worse. It could be they've been playing tougher teams than before. I'm not saying anything either way, just giving you something to think about. And haven't you seen those ads for the MWC? This is the best conference, above all the rest. Finally, yes.
--Der Berliner
Question #27110 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Do you think NCMO violates the law of chastity?
--Kissing Fiends

A: Dear That's against the Honor Code,
YES it does! Once again, we turn to the For the Strength of Youth. In short, "do not do anything that arouses those powerful emotions in yourself or other people." Meaning what? If you get turned on by making out with someone, it breaks the rules. Now don't misunderstand me, those feelings are great, but they are wrong if experienced outside the bounds of marriage. It's akin to a fourteen year old. It's illegal for them to drive, but that doesn't make all driving a bad thing, does it? But to answer your question again, yes, NCMO's are bad; yes they can get you disciplinary counseled; and yes, you could get expelled. Any more questions?
-The Scot

P.S. And for those of you that missed it last time: "For behold, it is not meet that I should command in all things; for he that is compelled in all things, the same is a slothful and not a wise servant; where he receiveth no reward." (D&C 58:36)
P.P.S. Always remember to check the archives; you might be surprised by what you find there.
A: Dear Fiends,
As long as you and she don't have children as a result of it, it's perfectly fine with me. Besides, this whole "does it follow the Law of Chastity" thing is overrated. If you honestly cared about following it you'd follow it in spirit and in word, so you wouldn't even consider NCMO'ing 'cause it seems as though it troubles you enough to ask us about it. Think about the Law of Chastity this way: would you want some guy to treat your sister the way that you're treating this girl? 'Cause I can assure you that there's a large brother (whether a relative or a friend) of hers somewhere ready to pound you if you mess with her.
--PEZkopf
A: Dear Kissing fiends,
Duh!
--Othello
A: Dear Kissing Fiends,
Visualize your future spouse. Make him/her exactly how you want. Now visualize your future spouse making out for an hour or so with someone he/she doesn't know. Imagine him/her doing it again. Again. Now visualize yourself in the temple, looking at this person kneeling across the altar from you. Now, simultaneously visualize kissing your spouse across the altar and all the previous make-out sessions they've gone through with people who meant nothing to them. Think about what that kiss might mean to them. If you're cool with all this, then NCMO away. Just don't hold your future spouse to a standard you're not going to keep.
--Der Berliner
A: Dear Kissing Fiends,
Oh, I don't have too much of an opinion about NCMO, but Spencer W. Kimball took a pretty firm stand on the matter, and his opinion counts more than mine. See The Miracle of Forgiveness for more information. Or get on the church's website and type in related sources. You'd be surprised what comes up when you run a search for "kissing".
--Benedick
A: Dear kissing fiends:
I sure hope not.
--The captain
Question #27109 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
While strolling around campus and studying for my degree, which is why I am here, I can't help but see way too many trendy girls. You know, the ones who seem to spend at least 2 hours getting ready and tend to wear a wardrobe worth more than the semester's tuition, glitter, 4-inch boots, and a cell phone (to make them popular). Why are they here? Mrs. Degrees are seemingly becoming more prevalent. Why?
--Sick of smelling and dealing with wife majors

A: Dear Sick,
Those girls are here because we want them to be here. You see, the nation which we live in is characterized by a market economy, and certainly nobody will dispute that BYU can be considered a market economy as well when it comes to dating. As such, within a market economy, it is amoral -- i.e. it doesn't care what end it gets to, just so long as it meets the demands of the consumers. Therefore, it perfectly mirrors society at the present time.
If we have lots of those girls it's because we want lots of those girls. Make sense? So, hypothetically, if you don't want girls like that then quit looking at them and start voicing your opinion and perhaps the market's preferences will shift and cause a new supply of a different good.
--PEZkopf
A: Dear Shafted one time too many,
A question in response: How do you know they are only doing it to make themselves popular? Maybe they really like wearing uncomfortable shoes and clothes that violate the dress code and having unbridled men leer at them. Did you ever think of that? I sure hope not, because if this was true the world would be in a lot more trouble than it already is. The problem is that that is what a lot of guys (notably freshman and fresh RM's) are looking for in women: eye candy. As one of my friends used to say: Boys are dumb; men are scum. Anywho, if it makes you feel any better, Isaiah mentions these exact females in Chapter three (see also 2 Nephi 13, if you're LDS) of his book. If you have any more questions about what Isaiah means, feel free to write back.
--The Scot
A: Dear Sick of smelling and dealing with wife majors,
I feel like I'm being master of the obvious here, with all the questions we've been getting. If you want to know why any one particular trendy girl is here, you will have to ask her. You say Mrs. Degrees are seemingly becoming more prevalent, but unless you've been here for a while, you don't know how many trendy girls tend to flit about BYU campus. We could be at an all-time low, but no one has done a survey, as far as I know. The next time you see one of those trendy girls, go ahead and ask her why she is here. She might be friendly enough to tell you.
--Der Berliner
A: Dear Sick of smelling and dealing with wife majors,
I must admit, I see where you are coming from. A lot of people pay a lot of attention to their appearance, which isn't necessarily a bad thing, but some people definitely go overboard. For them, that's what's important. I must admit, I don't put that much time into how I look, but I'm guy. It comes with the territory. And I must defend some of these BYU co-eds, since they cannot answer for themselves. Occasionally I meet a girl who appears to spend large amounts of time on her hair, clothes, etc. And in the past I have jumped to the conclusion that all she cares about is appearance and superficial qualities. But I've been proved wrong too many times to make that assumption, so just because a girl looks trendy, it doesn't mean she's here for an MRS degree. The current academic level of BYU necessitates a good deal of effort, and most BYU students are here to learn.
--Benedick
Question #27108 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Why do latinos have more rhythm than Caucasians, and why do they dance salsa like it was ballroom?
--Rhythmic latino
P.S. "They" meaning Caucasians (white boys/girls)

Dear 100 hour Board,
Why do latinos have more hips or bigger hips than white girls?
--mr. bagger vance

A: Dear Rhythm,
As you probably know, there was a Latin-Pop dance at the KMB last Saturday night. I looked around quite a bit, but was surprised to note that I was the worst white dancer around, which fact I found perturbing because I've been dancing since grade nine, and was much better than many of the latinos that I saw, which disproves your theorem that latinos have more rhythm, and which also segues nicely to the next answer. The reason that bilagannas dance like ballroom is because that's how most of us learned; whether through movies like "Strictly Ballroom," or dancing classes, it's just what we grew up with. You, on the other hand, were more likely raised in a society where dancing was prized more.
--The Scot
A: Dear Rhythmic Latino,
Great question! I've wondered that myself, and I've come to two conclusions. The first is that it's in latino's blood. I've seen little kids that can hardly walk dance and move to the music. But I think the bigger influence is the cultural factors. Latinos dance from childhood on, whereas most Americans find it somewhat embarrassing and unnatural. If gringos started dancing at the age of two, I suspect that they would have almost as much rhythm as latinos. For the matter of dancing salsa like it was ballroom, I don't know if I agree with you. Have you ever been in downtown Miami? That doesn't look like ballroom to me.
--Benvolio el Gringuito
A: Dear Rhythmic Latino,
I think the main reason is that Caucasians (i.e. white people with no rhythm) were in the bathroom when Heavenly Father was handing out rhythm genes. They tend to dance salsa as if it was ballroom because the have no idea what it is, and the only ones that have ever heard of it served foreign missions and can't dance anyways, therefore causing a large amount of pathetic dancing. We're hopeless when it comes to rhythm. Another really funny example of that is white people trying to hula dance. That's quite comical. It makes the trip to Hawaii worth it just to laugh at the tourists.
--PEZkopf
A: Dear mr. bagger vance,
Are you concerned about the hips of latinos or latinas? I'll assume latinas. I don't know if this is the absolute answer, but I once read a paper that theorized that the more society values a woman's role as a mother and child-bearer, the more larger hips will be considered attractive. You know, all that stuff they say about childbearing hips having a certain ratio to the waist or so. Because our culture is focusing more and more on women as workers and doctors and lawyers and all that stuff, slimmer hips have become more valued, as they are less "feminine" than large hips. The paper only looked at Latino and white cultures, so the results aren't that conclusive. Feel free to expand the research into Europe, Asia, and Africa.
--Der Berliner
A: Dear Bagger,
Well, technically they can't have MORE hips than anybody else due to their bone structure. They have the same amount as anybody else. And I wouldn't go so far as to say that they have bigger hips either, just that they know how to use them better (going back to the rhythm question) and therefore make them a more pronounced feature. White girls, on the other hand, hide them under Abercrombie and Fitch jeans, and so they're not quite the salient feature. Trust me, I've seen some whities with monster hips (and thighs, I might add).
--Hipster
Question #27107 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I live in a duplex and my neighbors have a band. They play sometimes late at night and early in the morning. Are there any rules or laws that could limit them? I'm trying to be courteous, but they don't seem to care about courtesy. What can I do?
--Becoming Hard Of Hearing

A: Dear you-need-to-have-your-hearing-checked,
I believe that Provo has a noise ordinance, the same ordinance that causes the termination of numerous certain persistent previous weekend parties that are too loud for neighbors. (I'm sure you've read many articles in the Daily Universe about parties being broken up... ) Anyway, should you find more neighbors who share your same plight in life, a word to the police would be useful in your circumstance. That will make 'em not play so much, and hey, they wouldn't even have to know it was you who complained. Oh, said ordinances of Provo are actually published online at http://www.provo.org/mayor/Provo_City_Ordinances/CH09.pdf. Check out chapter 9.06; it has everything in it you'd ever want to know about Public Disturbances (I'd paste it on here but it would be too long...)
--Missing London
A: Dear Becoming Hard of Hearing,
Have you asked them to please stop? They might not even know they are driving you crazy. If that doesn't work, then you may want to look into laws, but it doesn't hurt to try things the easy way first.
--Der Berliner
A: Dear Becoming Hard of Hearing,
It's always difficult to deal with neighbors; you're kind of stuck with 'em. But there are basic noise ordinances and it is possible to disturb the peace with excessively loud music. It sounds like you have already tried to deal with it in several ways, but sometimes it is necessary to file a public complaint. It doesn't improve neighborly relations, however, and I would definitely use it as a last resort.
--Benvolio
Question #27106 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
So, what's up with the delay of game call of the defense in the BYU vs SDSU? Is there really even a delay of game on the defense in the rules, or were the refs just goin' crazy?
-Confused but Satisfied Fan (we won)

A: Dear Confused,
You're not the only one wondering about the unusual call. Here's a direct quote from NCAA rules:

ILLEGAL DELAY OF GAME
The ball shall be declared ready for play consistently throughout the game by the referee when the officials are in position. Consuming more than 25 seconds to put the ball in play after it is declared ready for play is an illegal delay.
Illegal delay also includes:
a.) deliberately advancing the ball after it is dead.
b.) when a team has expended its three timeouts and commits a rule or infraction.
c.) when a team is not ready to play after an intermission between periods (other than the half), after a score, after a radio/TV/team timeout, or any time the referee orders the ball put in play.
d.) defensive verbal tactics that disconcert offensive signals.

So it is not incorrect to call the defensive team for delay of game, though it is unusual everywhere except in flag football. As for the details of what happened on the field and why the call was made, the viewing audience was pretty much left in the dark.

At least BYU won, I guess.
--CAPCOM
Question #27105 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I am currently enrolled in Zoology 260. In the anatomy lab there are many jars with fetuses in them. Where does the university obtain the fetuses?
Con amor,
- Still not paying attention

A: Querido Still not paying attention,
Believe it or not, there are catalogs that carry all sorts of biology specimens. I remember looking through the catalog my teacher used in high school. You could order a pig fetus or a cow brain or preserved starfish or frogs for dissecting. I'm not quite sure what kind of market these "fetus sellers" have, but lots of high schools and other learning institutions need stuff like that, so someone has to sell it.
--Benvolio
Question #27104 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
In room 205 of the J. Reuben Clark building, there are small blue squares of tape on every row of chairs on the left hand side of the room. Why?
With love,
- Obviously not paying attention in class

A: Dear Going to Flunk,
Very, very interesting. I went into that room just a few minutes ago, and was interrupted during my musings by the man who put the tape there in the first place. He'd never heard of us here at the Board, but once I explained the purpose, he was glad to help. So here goes:

About a week ago, they started to clean the upholstery on all the chairs in that room. When they finished a chair, they put a little blue sticker on the bottom right so that no one else would waste time cleaning it. "But wait," you say, "That would mean all the chairs would have blue on them, not just the ones on the left side." This is where the next genius of custodial comes in. After they finished the chairs, the carpet cleaning began. When one of the staff finished cleaning a section, s/he'd remove the sticker from it.

The left hand side has therefore not had its carpet shampooed yet. Voilá.
--The Irishman
Question #27103 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
How do you plant a seedless grape seed if seedless grapes have no seeds?
--The Great Grape

A: Dear Great Grape,
Seedless grapes are the offspring of grape hybrids that have an odd number of chromosome pairs. This creates a sterile generation that is unable to produce seeds. So they can't propagate, but they are able to be produced. You could also compare it to the creation of a mule--they are sterile but are created from two fertile parents that are not completely compatible.
--The captain
Question #27102 posted on 11/18/2002 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Where can I find information on the distances between certain locations on campus? How big is the campus from end to end?
--A Curious Jogger

A: Dear Curious Jogger,
Well, I went from x84636 (gen. information), to x25004 (institutional assessment and analysis), then to x24678 (campus tours), then to x25555 (grounds), and finally to x25552 (BYU's civil engineer). That's where I found Mr. Reese and his wonderful database of knowledge.

If you'd like to know the N-S distance from the ASB building to the JSB, then it's approximately 2200 ft. (running along the sidewalks). For any other specific distances, you can call the campus' Civil Engineer (Paul Reese) at x25552 and give him the two points, or go into their office (240 Brewster Building) and they'll pull out the maps and show you. That's as close as you're gonna get, unless you wanna bust out a wheel and measure out the distances yourself.
--PEZkopf
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I have heard that during the Third Reich, German scientists used Jews in Concentration Camps for medical experimentation. Are there any medical practices used today that stem from this research? And if so, was there a huge ethical debate about using them?
--CentiplegicCentipede

A: Dear CentiplegicCentipede,
"Medical experimentation" is a generous term for what the Nazis did with concentration camp prisoners. Most of the research went in to seeing how the human body reacted under harsh circumstances, such as high altitude or extreme cold, and the best ways to counter the effects. It's hard to say what practices may have come as a direct result of this research, because there has in fact been a bit of an ethical debate about using Nazi data or citing Nazi studies. For more on the ethical dilemma, here are some sources:

Bleich, J. David. "Utilization of Scientific Data Obtained through Immoral Experimentation," in Tradition, 26(1), Fall 1991, 65-76.
Campbell, Courtney S., ed. "Nazi Data: Dissociation from Evil," in The Hastings Center Report, 19 (July/August 1989). 16-19.
Moe, Kristine. "Should the Nazi Research Data be Cited?," in The Hastings Center Report, December 1984, 5-7.
Weitzman, Mark. "The Ethics of Using Nazi Medical Data: A Jewish Perspective," in Second Opinion, 14, July 1990, 27-38.

For even more references, visit
http://motlc.wiesenthal.com/resources/education/bibliograph/medex.html
--Der Berliner
posted on 11/21/2002 midnight
Dear 100 Hour Board,
I wanted to apologize for the assortment of bizarre people who seem to think that the 100-hour-board staff is "lazy" and doesn't do any real "research" about questions (i.e. Disenchanted in Board Question #27113.) Personally I think that a lot of effort was put into my question about medical experimentation in the Third Reich and the ethical debate (Board Question #27101) surrounding using said data. Thanks guys. Some of us appreciate the amount of work you put in despite the fact that you don't get paid.
--Centiplegic Centipede