"My brother is too kind. He was eminent when my eminence was only imminent." -Niles Crane
Question #25996 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Not an English major, I promise,

If a properly qualified and certifiably trained person was to actually use the word "y'all" in a sentence, he/she wouldn't be worried about how it is spelled...

- Don't go fixin what aint broke

Question #25993 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I REALLY wanted to take Social Dance 180 to meet people in my first semester at BYU, but since I'll just be a freshman, every class was completely full. Is there any chance that spots will open up? If not, what are some other easy classes with good opportunities to meet other students?

-Doesn't know anybody

A: Dear Doesn't Know,

Sure, spots could open up. Attend the first day of a 180 class with an add/drop card (which can be found at OneStop in 3220-3224 Wilkinson Student Center) and see if you can add it to your schedule.

As for other classes, you'll probably get to meet people in all your classes, as I assume you'll be doing a lot of generals. GE classes are usually rather large and you can meet all kinds of folks - Biology 100, Physical Science, etc. all have lots of people in them. Don't worry, you'll have plenty of opportunities to meet people. Just jump in and have fun!

Nike
A: Dear doesn't know anyone,

Ah, Dance 180. My cousin met his wife in that class, so I guess some of the stereotypes are true. Anyway, if you can't get in to the class, you might also considering joining Swing Kids, or one of the other clubs at BYU. You can find a complete listing here.

- Katya
Question #25992 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm a graduating high school senior that will enter BYU in the fall, and I earned a 5 on the AP European History exam when I took it in the spring of 2004. I've heard that this would filfill my Social Sciences Core requirement, but I haven't read anything that tells me for certain. Will this exam fill the requirement? If not, what are some of your recommendations for the Social Sciences classes?

- Stressed out by Registration

A: Dear don't stress,

According to this page, a 5 on the AP European History exam fills 6 credits of general European history electives, but no core credit hours. From looking at the undergraduate catalog, I'm not sure which classes (if any) could actually be replaced by that AP test, since BYU doesn't offer any 100- or 200-level general European history classes. If you're planning on majoring in history, the credit might count towards your 21 hours of history electives; you'd have to contact an advisor in the history department to make sure. (I had a high school English teacher who was convinced that AP tests were a huge scam because the people who run the program claim that they'll help you get ahead in college, but they tend to fall short of their promise, in practice. It's situations like this that make me wonder if she isn't right.) Regardless, your 6 credits will count towards priority registration and graduation.

As far as general social sciences classes go, I took Pl Sc 170 (Introduction to International Politics) and greatly enjoyed it.

- Katya
Question #25991 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

(My question is related to science, is it easier to heat up cold air(or water), or is it easier to cool down cold air(or water). I ask in the context of energy needed to do so. If neither does take the same amount of energy to do both)

- Anonymous

A: Dear Anonymous,

Heating a quanitity of a substance from temperature A to temperature B and cooling the same quantity of that same substance from temperature B to temperature A should involve the same change in energy, although the change in energy will be positive in one case and negative in the other.

In a practical situation, how "easy" it is to go in one direction or the other will depend on the actual temperatures involved and on some other factors. For example, cooling a glass of water from room temperature down to freezing will require electrical energy to run your freezer. Heating that same glass of water back to room temperature requires no electrical energy at all; you can simply leave the glass on a counter for a few hours. The change in energy is the same, but you're working against the air temperature of your house in the first case, and it's working in your favor in the second.

- the physics chick
Question #25988 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

how does a cell phone with predictive text decide what word is first when you type it in? is it because of alphabetical reasons? or is it that the most commonly used words are first? i cannot figure out the logic of which word is first predicted when i am writing a text message on my cell phone

i thank you

- A Drift

A: Dear Drifter,

I think this page is exactly what you are looking for.

Essentially, your phone contains a small database that has word entries based on the number sequence entered in. Each number sequence ties to a word or group of words that display. For example, the sequence of 8-4-3 links to the following words (at least in my phone): the, tie, vie, vid, and tid. Each number sequence also has a word that can be considered "the most commonly used" word. In our example, your phone would know (or have identified/labeled in some way) that the word "the" is used more often then "tid."
Amazing what technology can do now a days - it's starting to think for you!

Good luck!
-branflakes
A: Dear A Drift,

Your topic has crossed the road into the realm of Artificial Intelligence. Granted, it may not seem like it, but if you've heard of things like Neural Networks and Natural Language Processing, this is the same field.

Of course, your phone is not being quite as cool as all of these terms might suggest, and it's certainly not intelligent. Your phone has a dictionary of words it thinks you might enter. This dictionary is just like what your spell checker has in the word processor you use for your papers. As you type letters in, it jumps down the dictionary to the next match it thinks it could be. When the next possible word it can suggest does not fit the letters you have entered, it stops suggesting and assumes you are using a word unknown to it.

Now, if you had a cool phone, it would do more than this. Like you mentioned, a good way to do suggestions would be based on previous words you have entered. Open Office (open source word processor) does this and can suggests words to you based on what you have already typed in the document. An even more advanced/cool suggestion system would be if it could look at the previous text you have entered and, based on word probabilities, suggest a logical word that fits both the previous text and what you are currently entering.

Most cells phones could not be as "cool" as I just mentioned because of the required processing power to do it fast. A cell phone would eat a lot more battery when it made suggestions for you if this was the case, and that goes against the usability of the phone. Plus your suggested words would take more than seconds to load, something you would certainly notice.

A basic dictionary lookup is the most obvious solution in my mind for what a cell phone is designed for. All you do is store the dictionary and it requires very little effort on the phone's part to search through that dictionary. Mind you, this is just using what I've learned in my CS classes and what I think would make the most sense. It's a fascinating topic, but the potential is lost due to the limitations of a cell phone.

-Fractile
Question #25986 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Being a fellow American Idol fan, I have a question about one of the songs. It isn't a song sung by an Idol, it is the song by Daniel Powter that is played every time someone gets kicked off the show. During this last season, Daniel Powter himself came to the show (I think it was when Elliot got kicked off) and sang his song, "Bad Day" live. After this show, I was interested in watching the music video, which I promptly did the very next day. And as I watched the video, I couldn't help but notice the the girl on the video looked kind of familiar. Like she was in a movie or something. Well, of course I asked around but no one seems to know who she is. I was just wondering if you could tell me who she is and what other stuff she has done because it is driving me crazy knowing but not knowing.

- crazy bad day

A: Dear Crazy Bad Day,
A quick Google search for "danile powter music video actress" revealed numerous Web pages that had the answer. The following sentence comes from the Wikipedia article on Daniel Powter:
The video for "Bad Day" features actress Samaire Armstrong, best known for her role as Anna on the popular American television show The O.C. with Jason Adelman.
There's your answer to who she is and why you've seen her before. That wasn't hard, was it?

- de novo -
Question #25985 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who is Simon and why do I have to do what he says?

- Disobedient

A: Dear Dis,

Because his last name is Cowell and he's a hit-maker.

Nike
A: Dear Disobedient,
I think you're referring to the game Simon says, correct?

According to the electronic versions of the game:
"Simon's a computer, Simon has a brain, you either do what Simon says or else go down the drain."
That was apparently the old slogan.

More information and history of the game can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Says.

Frankly, I don't care who Simon is because I haven't listened to him in years. And years. Literal years.

-Zantedeschia
A: Dear disobedient,

Actually, it's a little known fact that the Simon in question is actually properly pronounced "Simón," as in Simón Bolívar, the famed freedom fighter in several South and Central American countries. Technically speaking, you only have to do what he says if you're a citizen of Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Panama, or Bolivia. As he liberated those countries, their citizens owe him an oath of fealty.

It's a common misconception that everyone has to obey him. Feel free to tell your friends the next time they try to make you play Simon Says.

- Optimistic.
Question #25982 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Unfortunately, not all people who hold hymnbooks treat them as carefully as they should, so our ward building currently has quite a few that are in a deplorable condition -- usually the binding at the spine is tearing off.

What is the best way to repair them (given that our ward is not likely to just replace them)?

- Ready to Fill a Need

A: Dear Need Filler,

We had the same problem with the Hymn books in our seminary class a couple years ago (well, a few more then a couple, but let's not get into that).

The solution we found was to get some wide green tape and go over the spine and covers. Something like this if I remember correctly. Granted it wasn't like new but they continued to serve a purpose.

Now these books weren't the one's that were used in the Chapel. So perhaps the ones in better condition located elsewhere in the building could be moved into the Chapel and the repaired ones could be placed in their stead (in YM/YW, Primary, Relief Society/Priesthood, etc). Then again, if members saw that their hymn books were being taped up they might start to treat them a little better.

Good luck!
-branflakes
A: Dear Ready to Fill a Need,

The Church distribution center actually sells LDS hymnbook repair kits, which consist of crack-and-peel endpaper patches and instructions for hymnbook repair. (You also need to provide clear binding tape, which can be purchased at an office supply store.) One kit includes enough patches to repair 50 books, and costs $16.50. (It's item #35664000, if you want to order it online.)

Good luck, and thanks for being willing to help.

- Katya
Question #25981 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm going to New York City for vacation in a month and was wondering if anyone has any travel tips. Is there anything besides the major attractions (Empire State Building, Ground Zero, Statue of Liberty, museums) that I shouldn't miss? Is there anything I should know about getting around in the city or finding affordable places to eat? Thanks for your help!

- I'm sure I will <3 NYC.

A: Dear (has never been to) NYC,

What a fun coincidence! I was just planning a trip to NYC for a roommate of mine. I'll just go ahead and pass on all the already-prepared lists of things to do I rustled up for her.

(I guess this might not be a coincidence; if you are my roommate, well, um, hey there. Said in a Midwestern accent, of course.)

To prepare for my roommate, I emailed two friends of mine who went to college in NYC. The first Totally Awesome Friend made a list that included most of the stereotypical tourist activities, and the second Totally Awesome Friend made a list that included more "I live here, so I get to do these super cool things" activities. I'll just go ahead and relay both lists.

First, from TAF #1:

Anyway, if she has never been to New York and wants to be a full blown tourist, she should go to Times Square, the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, and perhaps the Met (museum). If she wants to do something a little less touristy, she could go to Central Park or one of the less well known museums like the Guggenheim or the Whitney. If she can afford it, she should definitely check out a play or a musical. If she is cheap and nerdy, I would recommend the One Man Star Wars show, which is basically the original Star Wars trilogy done in charades form. If she is nerdy but not so cheap, she can try to get tickets to Spamalot, which is of course the Monty Python play and worth every penny. Finally, if she wants a more traditional New York musical, there is always, well, a ton of them, but Phantom of the Opera is a standard favorite, and I've always been partial to Fiddler on the Roof (I love Jewish music). To get tickets to these shows, the trick is to go to Times Square and there is a huge TKTS booth basically right smack in the middle and all tickets are 50% off for that night's show, but you have to pay cash. The added advantage to that is it makes you see Times Square, which I guess you have to see, no matter how much I hate it. If she is more of a shopping kind of girl, there is Soho for expensive and trendy kind of stuff (as well as some stuff in the non-clothes department that are unique like their stationary kind of stores). Or, she can go to Chinatown and buy a ton of either weird or knockoff goods like Prada bags and such. Also, if you are willing to go into shadier areas of Chinatown you can get the REALLY high quality knockoffs that are practically impossible to distinguish. In terms of food, it's pretty much all good, although she has to have pizza while there. I would basically tell her that she is not allowed to eat at any restaurant she has heard of before. I mean, with more information, I can give more specific help, but New York is basically all interesting, and as long as she does some things she has never done before, she will enjoy it.


From TAF#2:


I don't know what your friend goes for, but there's a really cool bar/place downtown and every wednesday they have a bluegrass night, where everyone brings his/her respective banjos and guitars and just jams, and it's amazing. It's called Baggot and it's on 3rd street.

Every tuesday night the Charles Mingus Big Band plays at a club I believe is called Iridium, and they are a total blast. Swing/really really good music. The Nuyorican poets cafe downtown is always a total blast (all of these things can be googled). They have spoken poetry contests, and some of the poets are totally wonderful. Either way, it's fun.

I would also get student rush tickets to the met, because, even if you don't like opera, the tickets are cheap, and the Met opera is just totally amazing (the building itself), It also offers an interesting view of manhattan life.


My roommate, clearly, is a girl, so I apologize if you're not. Have fun in New York, and don't forget: Yankees Suck!!

-Petra
A: Dear I'm sure you will too,
Check out Board Question #16026 and Board Question #16213 as well for food recommendations. :)
-Zantedeschia
Question #25980 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was watching some world cup soccer and I noticed that when a player would fall down injured the medical team would spray his legs with an aerosol can. What is in this can and how does it help?

- Forza Italia

A: Dear Forza Italia,

You know, I've been wondering what that is myself. So here's what I found out. What you see is none other then a type of coolant cold spray. It is a non-medicated spray thats main purpose is to provide quick pain relief and prevent swelling. In essence, it's much like an instant ice pack. Which helps me understand why it's often used when someone gets kicked in the leg or shins. Apparently it's not meant to be used on the head, neck, fingers or toes...just in case you were gonna try. :)

Hope this helps!
-branflakes
A: Dear Forza Italia,

See also this Explainer, from Slate.

- the librarian
Question #25979 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why does everyone always say, "Wash behind your ears!" Where did that originate, and why is behind your ears an important area to maintain?

Agatha of the exciting ears

A: Dear Agatha,

Well, first of all, everyone doesn't say that. I've had a mother for 21 years now, and I'm pretty sure she's never told me to wash behind my ears.

But you're right: this is a cliched phrase heard from mothers. You can especially visualize it from a June Cleaver type. The thing is, though, this phrase doesn't really have a concrete origin--it's just something moms say to their kids, along with "eat your vegetables" and "don't take candy from strangers."

It may seem strange, of course, but "wash behind your ears" is solid advice, just like the other two phrases. I don't know if you've noticed, but that area does, in fact, sweat quite a bit, coming down from the neck and scalp. Unlike other areas where sweat could pool, though, like the face, the back of the neck, or the armpits, it's not obvious that the backs of the ears are dirty, because one cannot see or smell back there. (I, at least, cannot.) Therefore, a small child in the tub or shower might forget, when washing the face, neck, and armpits, to scrub behind his or her ears; thus, a reminder from mother is necessary.

It's important to maintain the cleanliness of the back of the ears or you might end up like this guy. Honestly, gnarly cheeseballs? Gross.

There you have it. Mother really does know best. Well, mother and the 100 Hour Board.

-Petra
Question #25978 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

As near as I can tell, there is a building on campus named after every Latter-day Prophet, from Joseph Smith, up to (and now including) President Hinckley. The only two exceptions are Brigham Young (for obvious reasons), and Lorenzo Snow. Am I forgetting a building, or has President Snow been left out? Any ideas as to why?

- TheGoldenMean

A: Dear the Golden Mean,

Actually, there are a few more than just that. The following are the prophets who do not have buildings named after them:

- Wilford Woodruff
- Joseph Fielding Smith
- Howard W. Hunter

The Law library is named the Howard W. Hunter Library, but that is found within the J. Reuben Clark Building. Also, the primary building at the MTC is called the Wilford Woodruff building, but that isn't part of campus. Maybe after time we will have buildings named after every prophet.

Resilient
Question #25977 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When talking about cars, what defines a "class"? It seems like every car is best in it's '"class".

- Toy Yoda

A: Dear Toy Yoda,

As far as I know, "class" refers to the type of car, such as "compact cars", "full-sized trucks", "luxury sedans", and so forth.

-Beemer Boy
Question #25976 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Male 100 Hour Boarders,

What kind of make-up do you like women to wear?

-redaer draob

A: Dear Board Reader,

Alright, I think I can answer this one, but I probably won't use the right words or terms, so bear with me. I like how girls will put that light colored Eye Liner - you know, the make up that goes on the upper eye lid, but just a small line of it. That always looks nice. Also, I like a girl that doesn't cake on the foundation. I understand that some do it to hide freckles or unwanted acne, but you don't have to cake it on. In general, though, I like a girl that is able to put on make up in such a way that you can't tell that they are wearing it. I think that is the best way!

Resilient

A: Dear Reader,

To be completely honest, I don't know very much about makeup or the difference between types. To be even more honest, I'm not a fan of makeup in the first place. Yup, that's pretty much how I feel!

-the newbie
Question #25975 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In cartoons and pictures why am I always depicted golden? Hopefully not to just match the FAQ sign.

- The Pearly Gates

A: Dear the Pearly Gates,
Ah, good old Wikipedia.

"The Pearly gates, in Christianity, is an informal name for the gateway to Heaven, inspired by the description of the New Jerusalem in Revelation 21:21.
And the twelve gates were twelve pearls; every several gate was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass.
I can't find any reason that they are always gold, but there could be a few reasons. First, the scripture I just wrote noted that the street of the city was pure gold. Why not the gates as well?

Or, perhaps the color is symbolic. At first I was going to write about how gold signifies wealth (possibly spiritual wealth in this case?), value, etc., but then I realized that gold is also potrayed as evil (i.e. The Golden Calf and the priests of Baal) and selfishness, so maybe that's not a good idea.

Or here's a simple idea: gold is a pretty color. If the background of heaven is white (as it is depicted by clouds, etc. when placed with the pearly gates), white gates would totally blend in with white clouds. So we need another color to make them stand out and make them seem highly significant and important.

Why are harps always depicted in gold for angels? It's probably kind of the same thing. Gold is better than black or navy blue in heaven.

-ABC 123
A: Dear Pearls,

Well...it seems we think of everything in heaven as kind of glowing, bright and perfect, I guess, and gold seems to have at least a few of those tendencies. I like the idea of gold being the color for spiritual wealth - after all, the plates of the Book of Mormon are gold, right?

Basically, though, when it comes to cartoons and pictures, I think ABC's right - it just looks better with everything else white.

Nike
Question #25973 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

After reading Board Question #25869 (about favorite Star Wars quotes), I started wondering what other good movies you consider quotable, and what your favorite quotes from those movies are.

Aside from Star Wars, my favorite quote movie is The Princess Bride (please include favorite quotes from this movie, if you have any):

Miracle Max: "Get back, witch!" Valerie: "I'm not a witch, I'm your wife!"

- Cherry

A: Dear Cherry,

I have a ton of favorites, but I will only post a few:

---------
Vizzini: No more rhymes, now, I mean it!
Fezzik: Anybody want a peanut?
---------
Fezzik: Why do you wear a mask? Were you burned by acid, or something like that?
Westley: Oh no. It's just they're terribly comfortable. I think everyone will be wearing them in the future.
---------
Westley: Give us the gate key.
Yellin: I have no gate key.
Inigo Montoya: Fezzik, tear his arms off.
Yellin: Oh, you mean this gate key.
---------
Westley: "To the pain," means the first thing you lose will be your feet below the ankles, then your hands at the wrists, next your nose.
Prince Humperdinck: And, then my tongue I suppose. I killed you too quickly the last time; a mistake I don't mean to duplicate tonight.
Westley: I wasn't finished. The next thing you lose will be your left eye, followed by the right . . .
Prince Humperdinck: And, then my ears, I understand. Let's get on with it.
Westley: Wrong! Your ears you keep, and I'll tell you why. So that every shriek of every child at seeing your hideousness will be yours to cherish, every babe that weeps at your approach, every woman who cries out: "Dear God, what is that thing?" will echo in your perfect ears. That is what "to the pain" means. It means I leave you in anguish, wallowing in freakish misery, forever.
---------
The King: What was that for?
Buttercup: Because you have always been so kind to me, and I won't be seeing you again since I'm killing myself once we reach the honeymoon suite.
The King: Won't that be nice. She kissed me.
---------

Oh my love for that movie will never wavier.

Good luck!
-branflakes
A: Dear Flavor of Limeade at Sonic,

Well, although I don't really watch it much anymore, Zoolander does have some pretty good quotes:

"I became...bulimic."
"You can read minds?"

"Where on God's green earth am I going to find someone that...beef-headed?!?"

"Sting is another person I admire. I don't really listen to his music, but the fact that he makes it, I respect that."

Lots of fun.

Nike
A: Dear Cherry,

What a timely question. I spent all afternoon at work the other day reciting scenes from The Princess Bride. Here are some of my favorites (in addition to all the great ones that branflakes provided):

"Your pig-fiancé is too late."
"That may be the first time in my life that a man has dared insult me." "It won't be the last."
"I swear it will be done."
"It's possible, pig. I might be bluffing. It's conceivable, you miserable vomitous mass, that I'm only lying here because I lack the strength to stand. Then again, perhaps I have the strength after all. Drop. Your. Sword."
"Hello. My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die."
"You fell victim to one of the classic blunders! The most famous is never get involved in a land war in Asia, but only slightly less well known is this: never go in against a Sicilian when death is on the line!"
"Mawwiage. Mawwiage is what bwings us togevvah today. Mawwiage, that bwessed awwangement, that dweam wiffin a dweam..."
"Who are you?" "No one of conseqeuence." "I must know." "Get used to disappointment."
"Oh my sweet Westley, what have I done?!"
"Inconceivable!" "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
"Boo! Boo! Boo!"
"You killed my love." "It's possible. I kill a lot of people."
"Truly, you have a dizzying intellect."
"Rodents of unusual size? I don't think they exist."
"My brains, his steel, and your strength against sixty men, and you think a little head jiggle is supposed to make me happy?"

And they all lived happily ever after.

-Tangerine
Question #25970 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I understand that to get juice out of fruits, all it usually takes is squeezing them somehow. What about vegetables? For some reason I can't imagine much juice coming out if it gets squeezed. Do you have to mash up the vegetables and purree them to get the juice, or is there a less pulpy way?

- Redoubt

A: Dear Redoubt,

I think it's mostly citrus fruits that you can just squeeze; I don't know anyone who could squeeze an apple to get apple juice. Otherwise, your guess about vegetable juice is pretty accurate - electric juicers work by mashing or chopping the food into small pieces, then squeezing the pulp over a sieve to collect the juice. (The pulp is later discarded.)

Happy juicing (but not the steroid kind of juicing)!

- Katya
Question #25969 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In all the episdoes of Lassie did Timmy every really fall down a well?

- Rin-tin-tin

A: Dear Rin-tin-tin,

Actually, no.

The Unofficial Lassie Website gives an excellent explanation of the "Timmy's fallen down a well" phenomenon:
The classic Lassie joke has been for years this: "Bark! Bark-bark! Bark!" "What is it, Lassie?" "Bark! Bark-bark-bark! Bark-bark!" "What, Timmy's fallen in the well?" It's such a classic jibe that Jon Provost is writing his autobiography, apparently to be called Timmy's in the Well.

As far as I can see, of the dangerous things he could do, Timmy:
...let a rabid dog out of a cage ("Graduation")
...ate deadly nightshade berries ("Berrypickers")
...hides out in the treehouse when he has pneumonia ("Spartan")
...falls into the lake ("Transition" and "The House Guest")
...is almost shot by Paul ("Hungry Deer")
...gets appendicitis ("Hospital")
...is trapped in an abandoned house with Boomer ("Trapped")
...is menaced by a bear ("Campout" and "The Renegade")
...is trapped in a mine ("Old Henry")
...nearly flies a home-made glider off a cliff ("Flying Machine")
...is locked in a shed with Lassie by an armed robber ("Star Reporter")
...is exposed to radiation ("Space Traveler")
...gets trapped on a cliff with Rudy and Don ("Explorers")
...is trapped in a pipe ("Wrong Gift")
...is caught in quicksand ("The Fog")
...is trapped on a ledge ("The Rescue")
...is out in the woods hunting a dangerous tiger ("The Gentle Tiger")
...is tossed out of a little racing car and knocked out ("Big Race")
...is trapped in a mine with Cully ("Fool's Gold")
...is threatened by a bull ("White-Faced Bull")
...is threatened by a rabid dog ("Mad Dog")
...freezes while on a narrow path at the Grand Canyon ("Lassie at the Grand Canyon")
...is threatened by a killer collie ("Mysterious Intruder")
...is trapped in a badger hole ("Badger Game")
...is knocked out ("Hike")
...is stalked by a presumably dangerous tiger ("Lassie and the Tiger")
...with Lassie, is carried off in a balloon, must survive in the wilderness, and almost drowns ("The Journey")
...almost drowns ("Disappearance" part 1)
...is caught in an earthquake and threatened by a dam spillover ("Moving Mountain")
...is struck by a hit and run driver ("Hit'n'Run")

So of course the big joke is that never once has this kid ever fallen into a well! It was Paul who did, or, actually, almost fell into the well, in this episode ["Her Master's Voice" (01/12/64)]. The only main character in the Lassie series, in fact, who ever fell down a well was Lassie herself, in Season 17's "Well of Love," a.k.a. "For the Love of Lassie."
-Katya
Question #25967 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is Math 119 like? Will a new freshman like me be okay? I took AP Calc AB my junior year and got a 3, but I don't remember all of the concepts. How hard can I expect the class to be? I need to keep a scholarship and I really don't want my gpa to suffer...

-a thousand yellow daisies

A: Dear a thousand yellow daisies,
I took Math 119--twice. The first time I was a freshman, and I was doing fine but then I got sick, and I didn't realize that you could ask the teacher for an incomplete. So I got behind and was doomed and...failed it. Oops. Yeah.

The second time I took it I actually asked questions and paid attention because I wasn't sick... and I think I got an A- or something. So you'll do fine as long as you stay on top of your homework and ask questions when you don't understand something. Ask the TAs for help too. Good luck!

-Zantedeschia
Question #25966 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I haven't got a dime.
I'm on my last dime.
I bought it on my own dime.

What is it about dimes? Does it just sound better than nickel, quarter, or (sometimes) penny?

-Oh, just curious.

A: Dear curious,

I think dime does sound better. "I haven't got a quarter?" I'd be like, "Yeah...I don't either. What's your point?"

I don't know. I just like dime better.

Nike
A: Dear like I haven't heard that 'nym before,

Some people aren't quite as into dimes as others are. In fact, some of those people are ready to completely abolish the dime. Take a peek at Ihatedimes.com for more details.

Personally, I'm pretty indifferent toward dimes.

- Optimistic.
Question #25965 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Frequently when I'm driving I will see city workers out working at an intersection with what looks like a little camcorder on a tripod. They're usually on one of the corners (though I've seen them in the middle of the intersection before) with their little camcorder thing pointed at the street. What's going on here?

- Always wondered

A: Dear always wondered,

It sounds like you're talking about some type of leveling instrument commonly used by surveyers. (See Wikipedia's article on surveying for a picture.) Construction crews would use this type of equipment to find the exact spatial coordinates of a point and to make sure that roads are straight and level and stuff.

See Board Question #8964 for a related question.

- Katya
Question #25964 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board (particularly those writers who have children),

How much does it cost to have a baby? What I'm looking for is a breakdown from, say, conception to 1-year-old, of all the expenses involved, from doctors visits to diapers.

I know that exact numbers vary from person to person (i.e., they depend on where you're located, whether or not you're insured, etc.), but I'd like specifics of what should be happening (and when) and how much it might cost.

For the sake of making things a little easier, let's assume that both mother and child are healthy and have no unusual complications.

- Someday

A: Dear Someday,

I'm not a writer who has children, but I hope you can forgive me for stepping in here. Fun as it would be to do this research all over again, I'm going to have to cop out and just send you to the archives: Board Question #22603 talks about insurance and medical costs, Board Question #7529 lists all the things you'll need, and Board Question #8611 is pretty much your exact question.

Happy reading.

-Petra
Question #25963 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
About a year and a half ago there was a series of questions/comments on whether the Jews qualify as a race. The board writers seemed unanimous in saying that they are a race and vehemently disagreed with those who wrote in with other ideas and opinions. I don't want to re-start that whole heated issue, but it did come to mind when I recently attended the Houston Holocaust Museum. During the tour, the guide stated that there are 2 types of people who believe that the Jews are a race: 1) Anti-semites and 2) People who may have good intentions but are ignorant about the subject. Others at the museum, including Holocaust survivors, agreed. The board writers disagreed even when a Jew wrote in to say that they are not a race. Where did all of this come from? I have never met a Jew who felt that they were their own race but it seems a fairly common idea. I guess I am just confused about why there is a debate, why it seems so important, and what the interests are in arguing one side or the other.
- Texas Aggie

A: Dear Aggie,
I remember that discussion. I think part of the confusion comes from the fact that the term "race" is defined differently by different groups. The most common understanding of race may be the definition used by the government, since many forms have a location for race. The choices frequently include American Indian, Alaska Native, White/Caucasian, Black/African American, Asian, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, or other. However, these terms are just meant to gather statistical data and aren't really scientifically proper terms of race. The term "Hispanic," for example, is better defined in terms of ethnicity rather than race.

Some scientists would argue that there are only three general types of race: Caucasoid, Negroid, and Mongoloid. Others would break the Mongoloid group into two separate categories, Asian and Native American. These classifications are usually based on physical features such as skull types or DNA markers, but are less common today than in years past.

Even among scientists, there is considerable disagreement as to how to define race. In the social sciences, race is often blended or mixed with ethnic factors. Most people would agree that race and ethnicity are two separate things, but many people still disagree exactly how they should be defined.

Which brings us back to the question of whether some people are "racially" or "ethnically" Jews. Here, under the most general definition of race I can gather, I would probably disagree with many of the previous Board writers and say that there is probably not a "Jewish race." I haven't taken any skull measurements or anything, but I think most scientists would agree. There may be some common genetic traits among Jewish communities, but I doubt they would constitute a different "race." However, given the somewhat sloppy definitions promulgated by governmental organizations, it is easy to see how race and ethnicity are intermixed.

I would take some exception to the claim made at the Holocaust Museum, however. I would disagree that anyone, including past Board writers, who believes Jews are a race is either anti-Semitic or ignorant. I would correct their notions, but I believe the error came from different operating definitions of race and ethnicity rather than ill will towards Semitic peoples or ignorance on the subject.

For a fairly lengthy treatment on the subject, see the respective entries of race (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race) and ethnicity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnicity) in Wikipedia.

- de novo -
Question #25962 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A coworker and I cannot agree on something, and maybe you can help. Would you say that Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger are officially together?

- Way to obsessed with Harry Potter

A: Dear Harry Obsesser,

I would definitely say no. They want to be, but they're being too stupid at the moment to admit they like each other. Personally, I've always thought Harry and Hermione would make a nice match, but I think Ron and Hermione will probably end up together when all is said and done.

Nike
Question #25960 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Well, it happened. I had a baby. I don't know who else has gone through this, but you have my respect, admiration, and all notable qualities I just can't think of right now but exist to describe you (where did my brain go?).
So, now I must ask if anyone who has had association with babies of some type (in the newborn category, preferably) knows a very good way to relieve the baby's stomach. That is, do you have a cure-all burping strategy? I am breastfeeding, and do so in a bit of the cross-cradle position. When I sit my baby up, I try putting him on my shoulder, sitting him up on my lap (for pressure from his own legs/lower stomach), and eventually doing what my parents call the "football hold" of laying him on my left arm with my left hand in his stomach. My aunt swears by Mylicon, so we bought the Walgreen's brand of it. I have tried that (though I don't know if he even swallows that much of it with the combination of the dropper sucking in air bubbles, his crying, and his aversion to the taste), and some stomach massaging.
I must also note that I have had a steady diet, and don't think he is reacting to anything I eat (if you are one to believe that -what a controversial issue).
I don't think my baby is colicky (he sleeps well), but he is never happy when he's fully awake. I really think it's a gas problem. Would buying name-brand Mylicon solve all my woes?

- FuzzMonkey aka Married to the youngest

A: Dear FuzzMonkey,

Huh. Interesting name...

Well, I again enlisted the help of my mom. This is kind of like... her thing. Honestly though. Everyone is going to wonder if I answer any questions on my own. :)

She said:
Not sure how old the baby is, but it sounds like you are in the "4th Trimester" (the first three months of life) so maybe some of these can help:

1. You're doing the #1 best thing for your baby by breastfeeding! Good for you! Remember, baby doesn't need any supplements, not even water, until about the middle of the first year. Such things can upset the flora and fauna in the digestive tract and shouldn't be introduced.

2. Babies tend to settle down as time goes by...just as colic goes away at about 3 months, gassy tummies tend to settle down too, as the digestive system gets more adept.

3. If babe just doesn't seem happy, you might want to try using a sling. Many babies (probably most) seem happiest when they are in a sling, and mom can do other things while baby is in it, too. There are a lot of varieties...if you want more details or personal preferences, ask another question.

4. Relax. Sounds like you are on the right track in caring for babe. Might keep in mind the "5 S's". A source for more info about them is Dr. Karp's book, "The Happiest Baby On the Block". Be forewarned, though, his breastfeeding information is inaccurate at best, and some of his suggestions can be detrimental to the breastfeeding relationship. (I have met him and heard him speak on several occasions, and his video is amazing! You can get to clips from the video through the website.) But the "5 S's: are worth sharing...
S - Swaddling
S - Side (or Stomach) position
S - Shhhing
S - Swinging
S - Sucking

5. Oh yeah, about the Mylicon...never used it, don't know how good it is. But I suspect the generic will work about the same as the "real McCoy", so if I were you, I would save my money.

Lavish's mom (who has BTDT)
Oh, and also, she said it sounds like you know your stuff. She liked you. If you have more questions, feel free to email me- lavishable at gmail dot com. I'd be more than happy to get you in touch with my mom. She loves this kind of stuff.

- Lavish
Question #25957 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've been looking for the answer to this everywhere on the web, but I can't find what I'm looking for.
Who are the Mac guy and the PC guy on Apple's new commercials? Mac guy looks familiar, but I can't peg him.

Thanks,
- Wish I had a Mac

A: Dear Worthy Wishes,

Justin Long also appeared recently in "The Break Up" as the effeminate clerk at the Art Gallery. That was a very odd part for him... but decently funny. That kid is suddenly everywhere.

That is all.

Horatio the Mac User (20 years and counting)
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I heard that one of the General Authorities received revelation that Christ would come to earth in the year where there haven´t been any rainbows. Did you ever hear about it and where can we find it?

-sandy

A: Dear sandy,

So, I first read your question and thought, "Pish, I've never heard that. I'm so glad I'm going to get to debunk some more silly Mormon rumors!" I felt even more excited when the first thing I read about it--a Wikipedia article about end times prophecies says simply that "it is also believed, culturally, that no rainbows will appear at the time of the Second Coming." Ha, I thought. Ha! Just a cultural belief!

But then, luckily for you, I did a little bit more research...and it turns out it's not just cultural and that this "General Authority" of which you speak is none other than Joseph Smith himself. I quote first from the journal of Oliver B. Huntingdon, who knew the Prophet:

I heard Joseph Smith say that in the year that Jesus made his second appearance there would be no rainbow.

Next, from Donald W. Parry's Understanding the Signs of the Times:

Whatever the case may be with reference to these things, something apparently happened with reference to the rainbow in Noah's day, and something is certainly going to happen with reference to it in connection with the Lord's return...However this may be, again for reasons unknown to us, the rainbow will soon cease to show its glimmering rays of color in the mists and clouds of the air...But that same rainbow also bears a witness about something that lies in the future. "And the bow shall be in the cloud," the divine word continues, "and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant, which I made unto thy father Enoch; that, when men should keep all my commandments, Zion should again come on the earth, the city of Enoch which I have caught up unto myself." The rainbow bears record that God will send again the Zion of Enoch, that the ancient holy city, the ancient City of Holiness, will descend out of heaven and be with men again on earth...It is clear from the foregoing that there is some relationship between the destruction of the world by water in Noah's day, the destruction by fire in the day of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the placing of the rainbow in the heavens as a token of a covenant that involved both the flood and the Second Coming. Joseph Smith, with characteristic spiritual insight, ties the whole matter together by statements made on two different occasions. "The Lord deals with this people as a tender parent with a child," the Prophet said, "communicating light and intelligence and the knowledge of his ways as they can bear it. The inhabitants of the earth are asleep; they know not the day of their visitation. The Lord hath set the bow in the cloud for a sign that while it shall be seen, seed time and harvest, summer and winter shall not fail; but when it shall disappear, woe to that generation, for behold the end cometh quickly."

He also quotes Joseph Smith as saying,

"I have asked of the Lord concerning His coming," the Prophet also said, "and while asking the Lord, He gave a sign and said, 'In the days of Noah I set a bow in the heavens as a sign and token that in any year that the bow should be seen the Lord would not come; but there should be seed time and harvest during that year: but whenever you see the bow withdrawn, it shall be a token that there shall be famine, pestilence, and great distress among the nations, and that the coming of the Messiah is not far distant.' But I will take the responsibility upon myself to prophesy in the name of the Lord, that Christ will not come this year, . . . for we have seen the bow." (Teachings, pp 340-41.)

Next, from Bruce R. McConkie's Millennial Messiah: The Second Coming of the Son of Man, he lists some signs of the times:

1. Manifestations of blood, and fire, and vapors of smoke.

2. The sun shall be darkened and the moon turn into blood.

3. The stars shall hurl themselves from heaven.

4. The rainbow shall cease to appear in the mists and rains of heaven.

5. The sign of the Son of Man shall make its appearance.

6. A mighty earthquake, beyond anything of the past, shall shake the very foundations of the earth.

So there we have it. I guess it's true, and I ought to repent of being so skeptical.

-Petra
Question #25954 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need a back doctor. I've had back problems in the past before I was a resident of Utah County. I went as far as having an MRI on it. Do you know the back doctor that the BYU football coaches use and/or recommend here in Utah County?

- Lumbar Sprained

A: Dear Lumbar Sprained,
Before I go researching all of that for you. I pose a question. Do you have BYU Health insurance? Or do you have private insurance?

I ask because even if we recommend somebody, you're going to have to go through a few channels with your insurance provider to get to said person, if that person can be seen as approved by your insurance company.

Here's my recommendation, as one who has had numerous experiences with health insurance lately.

If you are on BYU health insurance, you're going to have to go to them first, mainly because to see another doctor in the valley you have to have their permission. If you launch out into the medical field and see a doctor without the health center knowing about it, they won't pay for it. A lot of student athletes have BYU health insurance so if you do want a doctor that they all go to, the heath center will be able to tell you the name of those doctor(s).

If you have private insurance, call your company and ask who your network recommends. I had to see a surgeon, and I called my insurance company to ask who they recommended. They recommended one of the best doctors in the valley who I didn't know. And fun enough, the surgeon I went to is on Team BYU and helps repair injuries to the soccer and basketball players. So I knew I had the very best care. So insurance companies do try to be helpful, not just annoying and time-consuming.

Good luck to you.

-Zantedeschia
Question #25953 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Are Hank and Dean really dead? Will they come back?

- Dr. Venture

A: Dear Dr. Venture,

First, just what I know you wanted: pictures! http://animatedtv.about.com/od/venturebrothers/ig/The-Venture-Brothers-Pictures/vb_logo.htm

There hasn't been an episode since 2004. (Episode lists can be found at http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0417373/episodes.) But hey, good news! Wikipedia says that the second season is set to begin on June 26, 2006, probably by the time this question posts. Hooray for you!

-Zantedeschia

Question #25952 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was watching my nephews playing at a family gathering last night. At one point, they were sending little train cars down a ramp and saying "wheee!" as the cars rolled to the bottom. That started me thinking. When and why did people start saying "wheee?" Any idea where it originated? And is it mostly when people are going down hills that they say it (on rollercoasters, going sledding, etc.)?

- fond of strange exclamations

A: Dear fond of strange exclamations,
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, whee is defined as the following: An exclamation of joy, exhilaration, astonishment, etc. Occas. as n., a high-pitched sound resembling this.

The first reference made to this word as an interjection was in 1918:
[1918 E. A. MACKINTOSH War, the Liberator IV. 145 Whee-ee-ee-errump! The air was full of dust and smoke from a little way up the trench.]
The etymology is nothing more than [Echoic.]

Whee as a verb (a. trans. With up. To stimulate, excite. U.S. colloq. b. intr. To utter a high-pitched sound) did not evolve until 1949, as printed in the Saturday Evening Post 3 December:
And did that whee him up to do his Christmas shopping early?
-ME
Question #25949 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Collective genius,

My roommate and I are throwing a Black and White themed group date in couple weeks. This means B&W attire, B&W decorations, a B&W movie (Wait Until Dark), and even B&W hors d'oeuvres...but we are having a little trouble coming up with ideas for an activity for before the movie. We want something to encourage talking and getting to know your date. There will probably be 6 to 8 people in attendance.

We thought of a possible scavenger hunt or maybe charades would be fun, but how to keep with the B&W theme? Do you guys have any insightful ideas for a B&W themed activity? (The best I could come up with so far is charades with the titles from B&W movies...but I don't know that many movies...and writing out the list would ruin the game for me.)

-Enjoys creative dating
(and wouldn't mind impressing a certain guy)

A: Dear enjoys creative dating,

I say keep the charades idea, but expand the categories to include (1) black and white movies, (2) black and white objects, (3) black objects, (4) white objects, and (5) any phrase including the words "black" or "white."

For example:

(1)
Casablanca
The Wizard of Oz
Citizen Kane
It's a Wonderful Life
Some Like It Hot

(2)
penguins
piano keyboard
chess board
Jolly Roger
nuns

(3)
coal
licorice
top hats

(4)
snow
wedding dresses
clouds
milk
doves

(5)
blackmail
black sheep
Black Watch
black holes
in the black

white lies
white noise
white flag
whiteout
whitewash

Split into teams to think of more terms, then trade terms with the other team. (Coming up with words could also count as a "getting to know you" activity, since the groups will have to work together.)

Good luck and have fun with your group date!

- Katya
Question #25948 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Once upon a time, I bought myself a fine used auto. When I bought it, the dealership threw in some kind of fancy paint protectant coating for free, so I just thought, 'hey, free thing, neat.'

Now, a couple years later, said coating is apparently starting to come off, leaving my car with a weird film over the paint that's fading into a pattern similar to dried-up dirt in the desert. Is there anything I can do about this, or do I just get to deal with an odd decoration on my car until it disappears completely?

- pippin galadriel moonchild

A: Dear PGM,
I haven't heard about anything like that, but I'm guessing if the dealership threw it in for "free" it probably isn't all it's cracked up to be (obviously).

Since you didn't give us specifics, I'd suggest contacting the dealer, or an autobody shop to see 1. what it is and 2. what can be done about it.

Good luck,
-Beemer Boy
Question #25943 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
While flipping through channels on the tv today, I saw a music video for a song that I instantly liked. The problem? I have no idea who the singer was. Oh yeah, and it was in Spanish, and I don't speak Spanish. Or at least not that much. I caught a few words "solos ninos, solas madres", "pies amor" and "cuando caminas." The singer was a 20-something male, with an eyebrow ring and a tattoo around his arm (both against the honor code, I know) with short, dark spikey hair. The style was a Latin pop/rock. The video was of the singer walking through crowded streets and riding on a train/subway. Any chance that someone on your board can give me the artist and title? I don't know where else to ask... Gracias!

-Dancing to an Unknown Drummer

A: Dear Dancing,

I suspect--but am not sure--that your "unknown drummer" is Juanes, a Colombian singer and that the song is "fijate bien." Unfortunately, I couldn't find the video anywhere on the 'net that would work on my computer, so I can't be sure. I can, however, post the lyrics and point out to you how they seem similar to the lyrics of your mystery song:
Despojado de tu casa
vas sin rumbo a la ciudad
sos el hijo de la nada
sos la vida que se va

Son los niños son los viejos
son las madres somos todos, caminando
Y no te olvides de ésto no no no

coro

Fijate bien donde pisas
fijate cuando caminas
no vaya ser que una mina
te desbarate los pies amor
Fijate bien donde pisas
fijate cuando caminas
no vaya ser que una mina
te desbarate los pies...

Ya no se quién es el dueño
de tu vida y de la mía
sólo sé que hay un cuento
que no parece que termina aquí

Como dicen en los diarios
y como dicen en la tele
y como dicen en la radio
que no parece que termina aquí

son los niños son los viejos
son las madres somos todos, caminando
y no te olvides de esto no no no

*chorus*

Fijate bien donde pisas
fijate cuando caminas
no vaya ser que una mina
te desbarate los pies amor/por favor

Por que ellos no van a buscarte
ellos no van a salvarte
ellos no van ellos no van no no
y tu no lo vas a creer


Also, this song was the single from his 2001 album Fijate Bien, so it's likely that the song had a music video associated with it. At least, I hope it did. I do so hate to be wrong.

-Petra

[Editor's note: You can view the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=va3rHJLgfUs]
Question #25937 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Sorry if there are already answers to this type of question in the Archives, but I don't have time to look through them at the moment that I'm posting. Feel free to include them if you find anything applicable.

I have serious questions, and I need your best answers, please.

I am trying to figure out how to cope with the idea of my Dad dating. My parents were married for nearly 30 years before my Mom passed away over a year ago (but under five years). Right now my father won't tell me anything... I just found out yesterday that he was "visiting a friend" at another ward after his. I asked him who and he wouldn't say. My Mother used to tell me that when she and my Dad were dating, he would introduce her as a "special friend," so I am rightfully concerned.

My Dad slept through our home ward (while in the meeting) for at least 10-15 years. Yesterday during the Father's Day call, he seemed kind of cheerful/chipper on the phone (not his norm) and when I mentioned money issues, he didn't bat an eyelash.

This is absolutely abnormal behavior for him, and I'm concerned. His behavior leads me to believe that he's either "met someone" or has some sort of relationship going on. I'd feel a little better if only there wasn't so much secrecy. Not letting me know is akin to lying to me, only with a nicer "ring" to it. If only he would tell me who she is (I am assuming it is a she) and how long... Give me a chance to adjust to the general idea, at least.

In addition to this, I asked my sister for info (there are only two of us) as well as a gal friend of both me and my sis and no one will tell me anything, but keep telling me to ask my Dad. More.... frustrating people! I'm not a busy-body at all; this is my Dad. I have a right to know something, I would hope.

I am not in favor of my Dad re-marrying right now... he emotionally abused my mother, and I don't want him doing something stupid to someone or someone doing something stupid to him, but currently have no choice but to sit by and wait.

Because I'm kind of a person who likes to be prepared for... practically anything, and right now am going out of my mind, I am asking for advice of how to deal with the ideas of:
a) parent(s) dating
b) how to deal with having a step-Mom or Dad
c) how to deal with having step-siblings
d) anything else you feel like mentioning.

I am asking you guys because I am 99.9% sure that you've either had to deal with this stuff before, and/or have had to think about it, in the very least. To me, this is serious, not fantasy. Please, I really need help with this.

Also, sorry this is a way-long post, but I wanted real advice and figured that the less ambiguous I was, that it might make answering easier.

Not wanting to hate my father,
Trying hard to be Christ-like and feeling tense

A: Dear We are all trying to be more Christ-Like,

I feel for your situation. I am also sorry to hear about the passing of your mother. Both situations are hard to deal with; you are not abnormal in feeling these things. Before I jump into giving some advice, I would just like to say one thing: tell your Dad how you are feeling about all of this. I don't know how he will react to your approach - since I don't know him - but at least you will be honest in sharing your feelings. Who knows, he might open up and tell you what you what is going on.

Allow me to pose a question: why do you think your Dad is dating again? Although my situation has been different, I have suffered a sense of loss through a divorce. The feeling of loneliness and want of companionship has not left, even when considering the marriage that I went through. It amazes me how that feeling and want has remained with me. In fact, there have been times that it has drove me crazy. I believe your Dad is feeling something similar. He is lonely. He was married for 30 years and is now alone. He may see only one real way of dealing with these feelings: find another mate. Which, for you, makes things more difficult.

In any issue or trial that we face in our life, I think it is crucial to understand, to an extent, the reason why it is happening. That is why I gave the above explination. Beyond this, the only suggestion I can give is to give it time. That doesn't sound like a good answer, and perhaps someone else might give something different, but that has been the case in my life.

I am a strong believer that we should approach one thing at a time. I would attempt to become more accepting of the fact that your Dad is dating before you move to any other issue. Plus, who knows what will happen with your Dad's "friend." It may turn out to be a short relationship; allow it time.

I really only wanted to comment on the first issue, as that was one of the fews things I could relate on and give advice. I hope that everything goes well for you. I can understand that it is not easy for you, but things always have a way of working out. Best of Luck!

Resilient
Question #25900 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

100 board people--

Where can I find info on people who are of other tribes? For example, a few people are of the tribe of Benjamin or Manasseh. What does that mean? Genesis 49 is all I can find that talks about those tribes' roles and I am looking hard to find info on what the other tribes do, but I haven't found much. Have any authorities said anything about them?

-Toasteroven, marrying someone who's from Benjamin

A: Dear Toasteroven,

Well, these are some intersting questions and I already gave you most of what this contains when you and your lovely bride-to-be were over here the other night. But I figured I'll post this anyway.

What does it mean to be of a tribe other than Ephraim? It means that your lineage comes through another tribe. I know that is a bit obvious, but that is what it means. Most people want to know why they weren't "chosen" to be of Ephraim. To be honest, for the most part it has little to do with being chosen.

Depending on what theory you subscribe to regarding the lost tribes, they are simply scattered across the earth, lost in that they do not remember their lineage, there is no record of it, and we can't identify them. As they are on the earth, so is their bloodline and it has mixed with the blood of the gentiles. Consequently, you may be of a tribal lineage and the patriarch I spoke with said that often, he is not declaring an adopted lineage (his feelings, thoughts, beliefs, and revelations). He is simply stating the bloodline that already flows through their veins. To further muddy the waters, it is not impossible nor imporobable that some or many people have more than one bloodline in them (have ancestors of different tribes). So, just because you were declared of ___________ tribe doesn't mean you don't also belong to another tribe as well. For more on the lost tribes and theories about them see: http://deseretbook.com/store/product?sku=2423805, http://deseretbook.com/store/product?sku=4395626, and http://deseretbook.com/store/product?sku=4940471.

As for the significance of being of another tribe, check out http://cumorah.com/12tribes.html. It has some fascinating information. Specifically on Bejamin, it contains the following info:
The Tribe of Benjamin Today
Benjamin = son of the right hand
Twelth son of Jacob; mother Rachel

Blessing of Benjamin
"Benjamin shall ravin as a wolf: in the morning he shall devour the prey, and at night he shall divide the spoil. All these are the twelve tribes of Israel: and this is it that their father spake unto them, and blessed them; every one according to his blessing he blessed them." Genesis 48:27-28

"And of Benjamin he said, The beloved of the Lord shall dwell in safety by him; and the LORD shall cover him all the day long, and he shall dwell between his shoulders." Deuteronomy 33:12

Members of the Tribe of Benjamin in Scripture
Ehud, who delivered Israel from the Moabites (Judges 3:15-30)
King Saul
Apostle Paul (Romans 11:1, Philippians 3:5)

Traditions of the Tribe of Benjamin
The tribe of Benjamin was the smallest of all of the tribes of Israel at the time of the united Kingdom of Israel because of the massacre of Benjaminites (1 Samuel 9:21, Judges 20-21). When the kingdom of Israel was divided, it appears that Benjamin originally sided with the northern Kingdom of Israel, as Kings records: "there was none that followed the house of David, but the tribe of Judah only" (1 Kings 12:20). Benjamin subsequently became part of the Kingdom of Judah, perhaps due to its proximity (1 Kings 12:21-23).

The Tribe of Benjamin in LDS Patriarchal Blessings
"One of my good friends from Kiev, Ukraine is of the tribe of Benjamin." Connie Gashler

"While serving on Temple Square quite a few of us, Central/Eastern European missionaries got our patriarchal blessings, and all but one of us was from Ephraim. A Ukrainian sister was from the tribe of Benjamin. Also, most of the members, who are from Hungary and have their patriarchal blessings are from Ephraim, and a few from Judah." Ágnes Bogar from Hungary

"I have recieved your e-mail in which you're asking for lineage of Russian members. Well, I used to be a Russian member until I had moved to the United States permanently. My lineage is Benjamin, if it can be any help to you." Dmitry Shakov

"[Sister Carpentier from Canada] is from the lineage of Benjamin." Debi Sparks

"When I was at BYU in the late 70's, my roommate was of the tribe of Benjamin. She was from Indiana. Her last name was Zickfoose." G.S. White

"My patriarchal blessing declares me of the tribe of Benjamin. I am a Caucasian American who is of English/Scottish/Irish/Dutch ancestry. All of my 6 siblings' patriarchal blessings, as well as my mother's, declare them from the tribe of Ephraim." Anonymous

"Two of our five children belong to the tribe of Benjamin, the rest to the tribe of Ephraim. One of their friends belongs to the tribe of Naphtali." Annie Kruyer, Canada.

"My husband born in Jerusalem of Russian-born parents is of Benjamin." Name withheld

"My patriarchal blessings says the following: 'On earth, Melanie, you are of the seed of Abraham and the blood of Israel in your ancient heritage. And within the household of Israel you are of the lineage of Benjamin...' My maiden name is Paquette but my real father was Benzel. His mother was from Lebanon and his father from Germany." Melanie Cooper

"My college roomate was from the tribe of Benjamin. She was from Northern Montana. Her Last name was Gilleece." Jean Mickelson

"I am from the tribe of Benjamin, I am also Mexican; I currently live in California. I am the oldest of six. I am only one with the patriarchal blessing, so I don't know if any one else in my family is from this tribe yet. My parents are from Manasseh." pepo (at) mexico. com

"I served my mission in Budapest Hungary. One gentleman I worked with there received his Patriarchal blessing and was declared of the tribe of Benjamin. Although he and his family had been in Hungary for numerous generations, he was of Jewish origin and his last name was Grosz; my guess was that he was from Russian or Ukrainian stock originally." clawrence (at) vlg.com

"I am from the tribe of Benjamin, I am also Brazilian; I currently live in São Paulo state, Campinas city. I am only one with the patriarchal blessing, so I don't know if any one else in my family is from this tribe yet" Jean Carlo, JMJeanmar (at) aol. com
I suggest reading through the article. It brings up some interesting points about the idea that many of us may have significant blood of another tribe but that Ephraim is "dominant" and will overshadow those other tribes. It is a very interesting read. I would love to see further analysis of his data.

-Pa Grape
Question #25784 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does living overseas give an advantage to people applying to BYU?

- abroad and dying to get into BYU

A: Dear abroad and dying to get into BYU,
According to an admissions counselor I talked to: "There is no advantage or disadvantage. End of story." I recommend just doing the best you can on your admission application. Good luck to you!
-ME
Question #25669 posted on 06/26/2006 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I went to the Great Salt Lake and wanted to float in it because you can, cause the salt, you know. But where I went I walked straight into the lake forever and it never got deep enough, my butt just would touch the ground. Where can I go that the lake is deep enough so I can float?

- The It's Just OK Salt Lake

A: Dear OK Salt Lake,

The lake, in general is pretty shallow around the edges. The people I talked to said you need to go out about a half a mile to really get to where you can float.

Mrs. Rafe suggests heading to Antelope Island. They even have fresh water showers on the beach (I'm sure other places along the lake have them too) to rinse off in afterwards.

Looks like you just need to do some walking before you can float.

-Rafe