"When you get a little older, you'll see how easy it is to become lured by the female of the species." - 1960's Batman TV show
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

With regards to Bro. Prime's answer to the question about declarations,

Board Question #41548

I would strongly recommend not purchasing the cited book. To make a long story short, the book is not what it purports to be and is a very slanted view of LDS belief. It is possible to lie by telling select facts and omitting others. If you wish to have the whole story, please read this review.

http://www.fairlds.org/Reviews/Rvw200702.html

A far more comprehensive book is a rather old six volume book that is probably available through Gospel link called "Messages of the First Presidency" by James R. Clark.

- Patata Brava

A: Dear Potato,

Thanks for the clarification!

-=Optimus Prime=-
Question #41699 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How excited are you see Juno on a scale of Black Licorice Jelly Bellys to the Pear Ones? (cuz the pear ones are the best!)

- Bleser and Dean

A: Dear CJ and Stealth,

Buttered popcorn jelly bellies.

-Kicks and Giggles
A: Dear Bleser and Dean,

Black licorice, definitely. (But this is because I am using the True and Living Jelly Bean scale, wherein black licorice jelly beans are obviously the best. Unless you have Scandinavian salty licorice, which is even better.)

- Katya
A: Dear Katya

I think your True and Living Jelly Bean scale is all scewumpous. Black licorice as the best? Blechy blech blech blech.

-Humble Master
Question #41698 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I know how much you all love dating questions...

So I moved into a BYU ward in the middle of the semester (so I was in the awkward position of being new when most everyone else already knows each other) and a guy starts talking to me, being friendly, etc. We become friends. My roommates notice (and point it out to me so I notice too) that he seems to always seek me out at activities, which is fine, but they wonder if there's more than friendship on his mind. Also fine, but not something I'd considered, so I start thinking along those lines and decide I'd be ok with it. Then, one Sunday, three different girls in the ward ask me what I think of him. I was really annoyed by them interfering (I barely knew them at the time) and also by him talking about me to other people. It seemed a little jr high to me. Anyway, he asks me out. We go on several dates. For some reason, he becomes distant and awkward, refuses to even hug me (after more than a month of "dating" if you can call it that) and can't seem to have a conversation that goes deeper than small talk. So I'm thinking it's time for me to be done since I'm losing interest and I don't want to lead him on. Here's the problem: one of those same girls who was talking to him about me in the beginning wants to know how things are going and won't stop asking when I tell her I don't want to talk about it. Frankly, I don't see how I can get out of this situation without looking like a jerk, especially since a lot of people know what's going on. I don't want to be a jerk. I just don't want to lead the guy on.

How in the world do I deal with this situation without 1) looking mean and 2) alienating myself from people in the ward because they think I'm mean? As a side note, isn't it weird for a 24-year-old guy to have to talk to several girls before getting up the courage to ask a girl out? And weirder for said girls to act like 7th grade gossip queens and put themselves into a situation that is none of their business?

- This is why I don't do inner-ward dating

A: Dear This ~

You act as though all guys are completely confident. Believe it or not, some guys need someone else to confirm that they're good enough for a certain girl. Or to confirm that said girl does not already have a boyfriend. Or that said girl is even his type. Perhaps you should have a little bit more sympathy and kindness to boys that simply need a little help and encouragement. Girls, being girls, want to help this poor boy out and hence start playing middle-man. Either that, or, being girls, just want to know everything.

Let's say that the boy is confident, though. You know how your roommates came up and pointed out that he was spending a lot of time with you? Well, isn't it possible that other girls have noticed this as well? Then let's consider that most of the ward is already well acquainted with each other, you've already said that. So, it's very possible that these girls are friends with this guy. These girls see the guy flirting with you and they start asking him and you about it. They're not trying to be meddlesome. They simply want to know. Have you really never seen a guy and a girl flirting and wondered if they were dating?

As for the pushy girl, maybe she has a crush on the boy. However, she doesn't want to move in on your territory. Thus, she keeps asking you in order to get an all-clear.

Now, how do you get out of the situation without appearing as a jerkface? Simple. Just become friends. If you can, talk to the boy about it. Find out why he's become distant. See if there's a remedy. If not, then part on a good note. When someone asks you about it, simply say, "Oh, we're friends." And act like it. Don't shun the boy. Don't ignore the girls. You want them to be mature? You'd better be mature about it yourself. Otherwise, you're being a hypocrite and have no leg to stand on. People understand that relationships don't work out. It happens all the time. So long as you're mature about it, the ward is not going to shun and alienate you for not marrying the boy.

~ Dragon Lady
Question #41696 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do people with big mouths bite their tongue less?

-Tasty Nippon

A: Dear Tasty ~

Highly doubtful. With bigger mouths come bigger tongues... and much more surface area to bite.

~ Dragon Lady
A: Dear Tasty Nippon,

Yes, if you mean both "big mouth" and "bite your tongue" figuratively.

- Katya
Question #41694 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I love rowing rowboats. I enjoy the feeling of power I get using the oars to move through the water. I don't particularly like canoes. They are more awkward to maneuver, you only use one oar at a time, and you usually need more than one person rowing at a time. Given this information, do you think I would like kayaking?

- Mad Margaret

A: Dear Mad Marge,

Even though I live near a major canoe and kayak factory, I don't know the first thing about either. Happily, my rooommate does, so I sent your question to her:
I think that canoes are hard to maneuver too. The paddles are awkward and you really need two people to do it properly and this can lead to problems. (My parents almost broke up while trying to paddle a canoe when they were dating!) Rowboats on the other hand are a one person show . . . they are a test of strength and maneuverability and usually associated with lovebirds getting together instead of falling apart.

Kayaks are somewhere between the two. Yes, you can still feel really powerful when paddling (the trick is in the balance and the hips). However you don't get that one big powerful stroke like in a rowboat — it's many more smaller strokes like in a canoe.

Last summer I lived on an island off of the coast of Maine and I had to kayak to the maine land (pun intended) every day to go to work. At first I was really frustrated because it took a half hour and it didn't seem like it should, but after I practiced I felt more capable and able.
- Katya
Question #41693 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear (or not so dear) CATS,

What are you playing at? You may have temporarily pulled the wool over the eyes of my favorite simian wordsmiths, but I still see you for what you are: a vile and despicable treacherous snake. The 100 Typing Monkeys are too good-natured to suspect you of betrayal, but I and others like me see it coming. What kinds of sick, evil, and twistedly maniacal scheming are you doing behind their backs? I insist you reveal your heinous plot.


My Dearest Monkey Friends,

I do not doubt your capable skills as reformers of evil-doers, but the black mark upon this world that was and is CATS is and forever has been unchangeably evil. Please, I beg of you to look upon your hearts and see that my cautions to you are valid. I fear that we will all rue the day that CATS unmasks himself for what he truly is and destroys another of your ranks, like the poor original #13, may he rest in peace.

- A friend to key-punching primates everywhere

A: Dear not-so-nice,

What am I playing at? Ha Ha Ha. I really don't understand why so many people are writing in and accusing me of things. First of all: I am not a snake. If you can't even get my species right how can anyone on this delightful Board trust you? Hmmm??? You have no chance.

Sincerely,
-CATS
A: Dear Friend

We appreciate your concern for us. And we understand your doubts about CATS. However, we feel that in order to demonstrate the supremacy of monkeys, in every aspect of existence, we must rise above the tactics employed by lesser beings, such as vampiric slugs, and instead prove the power of "friendshipping." Fear not, we are in control of the situation. We are confident that CATS will be our friend forever.

-100 Typing Monkeys
Question #41690 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are there any other (good) satellite mapping programs or websites besides Google Earth/Google Maps?

-Cartography is totally in style!

A: Dear mapmaker mapmaker, make me a map,

Yahoo Maps is decent, but still an inferior copy of Google Maps. I hate how it just blanks while loading new images when you zoom in and out. Mapquest also shows satellite views, but the interface stinks (thanks, AOL!). And of course, Microsoft has their own copy as well, called Live Search Maps. Good interface, but some of the places I checked had some pretty seriously outdated maps, but I really like the Bird's Eye view.

-=Optimus Prime=-
Question #41687 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are buck teeth hereditary?

-All I want for Christmas is my two front teeth

A: Dear If You Could Only Whistle,

Yes, buck teeth are hereditary to some extent. They definitely were in my case - I looked just like a rabbit when I was twelve, a trait I inherited from my father (along with duck-footedness, short stature, the tendency to peel like a reptile when sunburned, and other glamorous characteristics). However, the general consensus among various online orthodontists seems to be that while sometimes hereditary, buck teeth are often aggravated by behavioral things, like tongue thrust and thumb sucking.

~Hermia
Question #41686 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do be a board writer do you have to answer to certain amount of questions each week? One of the questions mentioned being committed.

- (Just Curious)

A: Dear Curious,

Yes, there is a "quota", of sorts. We're not terribly strict about it, but if a writer repeatedly and consistently falls below that level and does not improve after discussion with an editor, we feel it's only fair to give their position to someone who would be willing to consistently contribute.

-Yellow
A: Dear Curious,

Not only is there a quota, but it's higher now than it was when I started writing almost two years ago.

Writership isn't for the faint hearted, I guess.

-Tangerine
Question #41684 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite firefox add-ons?

- (FireFox Rules.)

A: Dear Firefox Fan-

My favorite (and only) Firefox add-on is Ad-Blocker Plus. Besides making the pages less annoying and cluttered, it also tends to get rid of some of the more questionable material on, say, torrent sites. There's some scary stuff out there.

-Foreman
A: Dear old school rules,

I use Adblock, All-in-One Gestures, Download Statusbar, and FlashGot (with Free Download Manager). Firefox does rule.

-=Optimus Prime=-
A: Dear devoteé,

I use Long Titles (lets you see the entirety of lengthy tooltips [the text that sometimes pops up when you hover over a picture]), and I'm experimenting with Google Browser Sync, even though I only have one computer. (It still has some nice features even if you're not syncing multiple computers.)

—Laser Jock
Question #41681 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood and was Chuck Norris?

- A disciple after the holy order of Norris

A: Dear Norris-ite,

Chuck Norris does not chuck wood. Chuck Norris glares at a forest which then turns itself into sawdust out of sheer terror.

~Hermia
Question #41680 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How did the accepted values for length and weight come about? It would seem like somebody somewhere said "my fingernail is this wide; therefore, this is a centimeter" or "my ring is this heavy; therefore I have a kilogram" or something like that (after all, that's how our "foot" came about--from some king of England's foot length). Is this somewhat how metrics came around, too?

- Craig Jessop

A: Dear Craig,

First off, there are a lot of units of length and weight in the world. (Wikipedia lists 120 and 84, respectively.) Most of them, like you guessed, are based on some outside object, although they can can range from a traditional surveying device (1 Gunter's chain = 66') to the average mass of a carbon-12 nucleon (1 amu = 1.6*10-27 kg).

In metric system, however, units are decimal variations of some base unit. So a centimeter isn't defined as the length of a fingernail (although it may be close), but as 1/100 of a meter. The standard meter has had many definitions over the years (See Board Question #25051) but it was originally intended to be one ten-millionth of the length of a quadrant of the meridian, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. The word "meter" itself means "a measure."

The gram was originally defined as the mass of a cubic centimeter of water. The word "gram" means "small weight." (Also, you'd have to have a pretty strong hand to wear a ring that weighed 2 kilograms — a cubic centimeter of pure gold weighs less than 20 grams.)

- Katya
A: Dear craig,

The metric system is the tool of the devil! My car gets forty rods to the hogshead, and that's the way I likes it!

-Cognoscente
Question #41678 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is/are your best flirting tip(s)? I'm a girl, interested in guys, if that helps.

-yoo hoo

A: Dear yoo hoo, and not the chocolate drink,

My best suggestion is zing. That means bacon. And when I speak of bacon I mean zing. Girls who withold zing until after marriage are missing out. Zing is the greatest thing in the world.

So, flirt with zig, I mean.. zing.

Sincerely,
-CATS
A: Dear Yoo Hoo,

See Board Question #30842.

- the librarian
Question #41677 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you actually been kissed under the mistletoe? Please elaborate.

-pucker

A: Dear pucker-

Not yet...

(Note: apparently, I'm going to link to that answer nearly every opportunity I get until I'm buried in applications. Maybe get used to it.)

-Foreman
A: Dear Pucker,

It was a chilly December day in 2006. Not long before BYU was suppose to get out for the Christmas holiday, I was taking a walk with a beloved boyfriend of mine. We were alone up in the Provo canyon enjoying the previous daý’s snowfall. Sweetly we walked hand and hand through the glorious snow, the sun shining in the sky. We were smiling and talking about the Christmas holiday. Suddenly, with an impish grin on my face I reached down and scooped up some snow, quickly I turned and dumped it on the handsome boy's head. He turned to me with a look of shock and informed me that the snow war had begun! For the next 15 minutes we spontaneously threw snow balls and tackled each other in the frozen snow. When he finally had to stop (as neither of us could feel our fingers) we sat and talked for a few minutes under a nearby tree. In the midst of talking the beautiful man looked towards the heavens. He then turned and looked at me, a smile playing on his lips. He asked if I would so oblige him and look up myself. When I looked heavenward I noticed a dark green sprig of mistletoe directly above our heads among the empty brown branches. Now the smile was playing on my lips as I looked back at my love with one eye-brow raised. He raised one hand and placed it tenderly on my cheek. We both leaned forward slowly and he sweetly and gently kissed my lips. I grinned in delight. It was a perfect moment there in the sunshine and snow, kissing underneath the mistletoe.

~Krishna
And yes that is a true story.
A: Dear pucker,

Not yet. Why? Were you interested?

-Yellow
Question #41674 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When and why did it become popular to use phrases in other languages? For example, the phrase "faux pas", "propia persona" (D&C 128:8), "summa bonum" (D&C 128:11). I could understand if there just wasn't a translatable phrase in English, but it seems most of the time like it was either a fad, or that people want to show off their language skills.

-plum

A: Dear prugna (Ha!):

Since the beginning of the language, man. Of course, this chart illustrates influences on the language, more than outright borrowings, but I would venture that at one time much of the vocabulary I am using in this paragraph seemed foreign and très snob, as well.

We should just boycott the use of these pretentious foreign phrases! It's "not déjà vu, but instead, a 'freedom recollection.'"

Languages like Latin were historically very much a part of the elite castes of society, including the Church and academia.

I'm not sure the phrases you listed have perfect English translations. Does it really have the same connotative sense to say "false step"? "In propria persona" is a legal phrase, not a random use of Latin.

---Portia
A: Dear sugar fairy,

I don't mean to be in any way rude, but I think you're looking on history with a very narrow view. Languages, especially are English, are in no way set in stone and until recently had little concept of a formal list of accepted words. Language evolves at a fairly slow pace, so in your lifetime you will have noticed very little change, but there are tens of thousands of words in English that have been borrowed from other languages.

Knowing more than one language was more common in the past and because of fluid borders there were thousands of different varieties of each. If you have ever learned a foreign language you know that some foreign words express a meaning unexpressable in another, or are of enough variation to warrant their use instead of the native counterpart. These words are borrowed and eventually become integrated into English. Some of it is to show off, no doubt, but often it's just more practical to use a word that has a more precise meaning. The list of borrowed French words alone (which in turn come mainly from Latin) will probably surprise you. And many of these are fairly recent acquisitions.

This phenomenon is still chugging along today, especially in the opposite direction. If you've been to a non-English-speaking country lately, you know that they are incorporating dozens of English words relating to computers and culture. And you're using words that have been incorporated into English as recently as the 1800s (that do have English equivalents) like the German blitz and angst, French lingerie and restaurant, and the list could go on and on.

I think it was no more a fad in any other time than it is now. Back then they encountered a lot of French and German. Today we're running into Arabic and other languages more. We could say "islamic holy war" instead of "jihad", but we don't. We could also say "islamic church" instead of "mosque", but it's easier to just borrow the word.

So in answer to your question, it's always been popular. Besides, it's so much more fun to say "faux pas" than "social blunder".

-=Optimus Prime=-
Question #41673 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

On soda cans and bottles, it often lists (I assume) state abbreviations and then monetary denominations--like ME 5 cents refund. I assume that means you can turn the can/bottle in somewhere and earn 5 cents--I vaguely remember doing that when I was five, in Arizona. My question is what kind of program is this and why is Utah never listed?

-Could use some extra bucks

A: Dear could,

It's a recycling incentive program. When you buy soda cans/bottles you pay a deposit in those states. When you return the cans to the store's recycling machines you get your deposit back. Honestly, I'm not sure why Utah doesn't do this (or push recycling at all really). Having grown up in a state that did do bottle deposits, I feel really weird every time I throw out an empty soda can.

-Curious Physics Minor
A: Dear Could

Just to make it clear, that's not just the worth of the bottle if you turn it in for recycling in those states, its an extra cost that's added on when you purchase it. So, if you live in Michigan, which has a 10 cent deposit, you pay an extra $1.20 when you buy a twelve pack of soda, or an extra dime when you buy a 2-liter. Thus, you're not making any money, you simply get that money back when you turn those cans or bottles in for recycling.

-Humble Master
Question #41672 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

It may be too late, but I was wondering if Men's Chorus holds auditions winter semester. I've looked all over on the BYU website and I can't find information anyhere. Do you guys know what's up?

- Confused

A: Dear Dazed:

See the answers of K&G and me to the same questions for Women's Chorus. Yes, it would be too late. That happened beginning of December, I'm guessing. You can always try contacting Rosalind Hall if you're feeling persistent.

---Portia
Question #41671 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where does the cockroach in the mouth story originate from? You know, the one where a person supposedly eats/licks something and ends up with a cockroach egg inside their cheek/tongue which then miraculously develops into a live cockroach encased within the flesh of the person's mouth. I've heard many versions--Taco Bell, envelope glue, etc.

-My mission companion would NOT lick an envelope--fear of cockroach contamination

A: Dear RM,

Although I'm sure such stories have been around for decades, Barbara Mikkelson (the brilliant research mind behind snopes.com) has already traced some specific roach-related rumors, including your two examples (Taco Bell and envelope glue). Check it out, it's pretty interesting; if quite disgusting.

~Hermia
Question #41670 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What does "ibid." mean? "e.g"? "i.e."? Where do these come from?

-etc.

A: Dear Etc.,

I think Wikipedia sums up the where and why quite well:
Latin was once the universal academic language in Europe. From the eighteenth century authors started using their mother tongue to write books, papers or proceedings. However, many Latin abbreviations continued to be used due to their precise simplicity and also Latin's status as a learned language.
Here are the meanings for the phrases you asked about:
  • Ibid. is short for ibidem, and means "in the same place" (usually the same book). It is used in citations.
  • E.g. stands for exempli gratia, meaning "for example" or "for instance."
  • I.e. stands for id est, meaning "that is" or "in other words."
Check out the rest of the article on Latin abbreviations for more common Latin phrases and their meanings.

—Laser Jock
A: Dear etsy,

See also Board Question #12411 and Board Question #8757.

-=Optimus Prime=-
Question #41669 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you tie a turban?

-turban-ally challenged

A: Dear turban ~

Look it up on Google. Amazing what you'll get. Pictures, videos. Here, I'll even give you one. And I can attest that this is really how they tie turbans in the Middle East. Our Jordanian taxi driver dressed Brother up as a Muslim once. It was quite an amazing experience, really.

~ Dragon Lady
Question #41667 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How does a Downy Ball work? I think they are magical little works of genius!

-fluff

A: Dear fluff ~

Newton's first law of motion: "An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force."

The ball starts out floating on top of the water with the lid pulled shut. And there it sits, happy as can be, through the first few cycles. When the spin cycle starts, it's pulled against the side of the washer. When it hits the side, the heavy rubber weight inside the ball, connected to the lid, wants to keep going. (First law of motion!) The weight keeps going which pulls the stopper out of the top of the ball. The ball is now open and water can get inside so it will sink to the bottom of the washer. The water mixes with the fabric softener and flows back out. The timing is perfect, the fabric softener is diluted so it won't land in concentrated form on your clothes, and everyone is happy.

~ Dragon Lady
Question #41666 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Cedar is used many times as a preservative, particularly with clothing. How exactly does it preserve? Are there other ways that are just as effective?

-fluff

A: Dear fluff,

Cedar "preserves" clothing because it is a natural moth repellant, and moths like to munch on wool and other fibers. Mothballs also work, but cedar smells nicer and you can buy cedar balls or cubes, if you can't afford an entire cedar chest.

- Katya
Question #41665 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

People are always licking their fingers to turn a piece of paper. I can see why that might be necessary if you were flipping through 500 pages, but seriously, is it really necessary when you need to turn just one page? I find it nasty. So tell me please, what is the actual success ratio of licking your finger to turn a page vs. unlicked finger? How much faster is it really? And how many germs are spread by using the lick method?

-not a cat

A: Dear not,

I lick my finger only when an attempted page turn using a dry finger proves unsuccessful. I have not counted the number of page turns I have made in my life, licked or unlicked, and so I can provide you with no solid statistic. However, I can tell you that my unlicked turn attempts have been less than 100% successful, while licked attempts have been 100% successful. It's not about speed for me; it's about being able to actually grip and turn the page, but I would assume that there is no real speed difference between licked and unlicked page turns.

As for your last question, that is absolutely unquantifiable. Saliva does spread a lot of germs - but so do fingers. And air.

So, you asked a lot of questions here, but reading between the lines, I think your real question is: "Ug! Isn't it disgusting and unnecessary that people lick their fingers to turn pages?" And my answer is, Yes, it's probably a little disgusting, but not always unnecessary in my experience. Sorry if you find me gross. If it makes you feel better, I do brush, floss, and gargle regularly.

Sincerely,

The Cleaning Lady
Question #41664 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How can I learn how to yodel?

-Alpy

A: Dear Alpy ~

I would suggested taking a Yodel Course. If you complete the one I just linked you to, you even get a Certificate of Yodelology. How much better can it get?

~ Dragon Lady
A: Dear Alpy

This kid from America's Got Talent learned her mad yodeling skills from a tape and instruction booklet. Go watch that video. Not only do you see an eleven-year-old with mad yodeling skills, you see David Haselhoff react to an eleven-year-old with mad yodeling skills. What more could you ask for?

-Humble Master
Question #41662 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why does biting tin foil hurt/feel weird?

-Tinny

A: Dear Tinny-

Chex it out
.

-Foreman
Question #41661 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do Americans always spell things with a "k" that are actually not spelled with a "k"? For example: Kwikset, Kraft, Kozy Korner, Krazy. I guess I could see why they would use it occasionally--to create an alliteration when one of the words actually does begin with "k", but I don't understand when there seems to be absolutely no relation. When did this whole fad start?

-k boycotter

A: Dear boycotter,

You've implied the answer within your question. All the phrases you referred to are trademarks. If Kraft had named their company Craft instead it is unlikely that they'd ever be able to successfully sue someone for trademark violations. By using a 'K' instead you can still get the same sound, but you also get uniqueness for the trademark allowing you a much better chance of suing someone that's violating your trademark.

-Curious Physics Minor
A: Dear k

Also, those companies use the K-spelling to make their names unique so that they stick in people's head. Obviously it works, since you rattled them off with ease.

-Humble Master
Question #41660 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I really get into ethnic-y sounding music that is kind of amped-up/modernized. Good examples are Shakira's "Eyes like yours" and William Joseph's "Kashmir". I don' really know how to describe this genre--I think it's better heard/felt than described. Anyway, where can I find more music like this?

- Wish I was a more cultured person

A: Dear wisher,

Gogol Bordello. Flogging Molly. RBD.

-Olympus
Question #41659 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So, I'm embarrassed to even be writing this, but I've been thinking about taking a marriage prep class--yikes! The reason being, I figure it's a good idea to take one sometime before being married, and now is the time I am furthest away from thinking about marriage. I would think that would help me to take the course logically and reasonably and get the fullest information--i'm a sappy romantic and so I think if I took it when I was actually dating someone/had interest in getting married in the near future, I would only hear/apply what I wanted to. Don't ask me why I felt the need to justify that. Anyway, my actual question is if any of you have taken marriage prep, are there any teachers you can recommend, or do you have advice on when is the best time to take the class. Whew. Thanks!


- Wonderfully single

A: Dear single,

I took Rel C 234: LDS Marriage and Families about 3 years ago. It was interesting and I enjoyed it. However, I don't remember who my teacher was at this point, it may have been Professor Merrill. I took it way back when because I thought it might be interesting and would probably be a religion class least like seminary.

-Curious Physics Minor
A: Dear Wonderfully Single,

My initial response would be to take HFL 223 (Marriage Prep) from Professor Barlow. That man is amazing. However, that man is also retiring. So that ship has sailed.

Still, I would recommend HFL 223. It is an excellent class and really teaches you a lot of practical things about dating and marriage (not just the spiritual aspects). Not only is it a great class for learning about and preparing you for marriage but it also helps to teach you about human relationships in general. Take it! I think you'll enjoy it.

~Krishna
Question #41658 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In the 80's there was a band named the Way Back Machine and Larry Williams was in this band playing the saxophone. Do you know of any way to contact Larry? I ask because I sorta know his daughter and they have never met. I thought I might as well ask The Board just in case.

- Searching...

A: Dear Searching:

Maybe I am completely confused on this, but it sounds to me like you know Miss Williams, but she doesn't know who her semi-famous father is? Or she does, and has never met him? All I can say is that you are the one who knows someone connected to all of this: use your resources.

Searching the "Way Back Machine brings up results about" an Internet archive, not a band.

Our resources on finding A-list celebrities are limited: these become even more so with D-list ones. Sorry.

---Portia
Question #41656 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dearest Board of 100 Hours,

How does one become ridiculously hilarious?

- Christmas Cactus, who wishes she were

A: Dear Desert Pine,

Hang out with people who are ridiculously hilarious. All the time. Also, consume ridiculously hilarious entertainment as often as possible.

-Olympus
A: Dear CC:

Be Uffish.

Dark Chocolate

A: Dear CC,

One thing you should NOT do is try constantly to be ridiculously hilarious. That is just really, really annoying.

Other than that, I'm sure I don't know. I myself am kind of boring and devoid of humor. But I'm kind of nice.

Sincerely,

The Cleaning Lady
Question #41652 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Whenever I try to access deviantart.com nowadays, all I get is a white screen that says "Failure To Connect To Web Server." This happens from both the computers at my house, if we use either internet explorer or firefox. The rest of the internet works perfectly fine. It seems that deviantart.com is working for everyone else on the internet, so something must be wrong at my house. Have any ideas on how to fix the problem?

- C

A: C,

Email them (help@deviantart.com)?

-Calcifer
A: Dear Cherries:

It works fine on my computer. Why don't you access it at somewhere other than your house? Maybe you have a firewall set up which is blocking it. We don't do computer support, especially when it has nothing to do with either the Board or BYU. (Don't worry, though: I've certainly asked computer-y questions, but I've since come to realize how little we can help in areas like this.)

---Portia
Question #41618 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was surprised at the answers in the small-sample response regarding proposing and rings in Board Question #41502. I do not want to be redundant, but I was so shocked I wanted to ask this question again with a different emphasis: How much talk of marriage should be talked before a a guy proposes? I've been of the opinion that you can know a girl will say yes to marrying you, without ever actually having discussed being married. (There are PLENTY of discussions that need to take place prior to that: finances, kids, etc. But I've always thought one could still know.)

A completely unique question on top of this: when is it appropriate to start discussing sex in a relationship? My assumption is that the majority of people would recommend only after being engaged really discussing the topic, but I was seemingly wrong on the last question so I figured I'd throw this one out there too.

-wired

A: Dear Re-Asker,

"When is it appropriate to start discussing sex in a relationship? My assumption is that the majority of people would recommend only after being engaged."

I think it's fine, no, good to be somewhat aware of your and your werffriend's physical and even to some extent sexual expectations before engagement, as long as you aren't trying to titillate said werf to do something they ought not. I don't think sex is bad in any way at the right time, and having too much taboo about it could possibly increase its appeal in some ways. This is just my opinion: don't take this as any point of doctrine.

-Wanting to Preserve Some Anonymity.
A: Dear wired,

"Should" is an interesting idea; I don't think there's a hard-and-fast rule for a lot of things related to getting married. Here's my own experience (for this question, and also the related Board Question #41502).

*We talked about potential marriage dates in a way that was not hypothetical a few weeks before we got engaged. This was for planning purposes, though, rather than to determine whether or not we wanted to get married. There really wasn't any doubt about that.

*I did not pick out a ring, and in fact refused to go ring shopping. I told him generally what I wanted and my ring size when we talked about dates. The ring and the timing were a surprise.

*We never discussed sex before marriage, not because we were skirting the issue, but because...I don't know, we didn't feel like it? We also didn't read any books on sex or go to any marriage prep classes, because we didn't want to or feel the need (I guess that's probably as much as we discussed: "Do you have the slightest interest in reading 'Between Husband and Wife'?" - "No.") And everything was fine.

So, "should" everyone be like me? Well, I think my choices have been the best options; that's why I made them. But not everyone's situation IS like mine, so I guess they "should" do what's best for them.

-Madame Mimm
Question #41588 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is that foul smell on the north side of the HBLL atrium these past couple of days? Is it caused by those mysterious poppyseed-looking black dots all over that flower bed?

- need some fresh air

A: Dear need,

Uh, sure. Yes. Yes it is.

Enjoy your fresh air over Christmas break!

Sincerely,

The Cleaning Lady
Question #41550 posted on 12/22/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

First of all, I'm really happy that you solved my last Cougareat mystery! But thinking about it made me think of another mystery from my Cougareat days. (Yes, I realize that I think about the Cougareat way too much, especially since I graduated and moved away in August.) Well anyway, I remember that sometime over the summer they took down the big signs in Cougar Express (the ones on the walls that said like "Soup" and "Drinks" and stuff) and replaced them with brand-new signs. But the mystery is what did they do with the old ones? They were so cool--they had a kind of outer-space motif going, with people in space suits eating Cougar Express food. My favorite was the KFC one because there was a little chicken in a space suit. But where did they go? (My theory has always been that they're saving them somewhere in the hopes that someday a Cougareat museum will be erected and they can use them in an exhibit about Cougar Express.)

A: Dear Nameless,

You know what, you're absolutely right! They are saving those cool signs, along with a bunch of other incredible ones, precisely for the permanent Cougar Express exhibit in the Cougareat Museum, scheduled for construction in 2010. Hope to see you at the grand opening!*

Sincerely,

The Cleaning Lady

*Unfortunately, that answer is completely made up to shield you from the awful truth...Holly from the Cougareat reports that the posters have actually been thrown away. I'm so sorry, and hope you can have a merry Christmas anyway.