"My brother is too kind. He was eminent when my eminence was only imminent." -Niles Crane
Question #36847 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
re:Board Question #36706

I have found a simple way to password protect things.

type in a random password (i.e. poeij87&21khdjt62) that you won't remember.

Give the password to a trusted friend, and delete all references to it. That way you don't know the password, and if you have a good reason to use it, you face your friend first.

- jj

Question #36842 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board & AOC,

Board Question #36706 The Ensign a little while back had an article that dealt with pornography and the printed word. It talked about how books tended to attract more women because they are more verbally oriented but the effects are the same as visual things on men. It was an article called "Addicted to Romance Novels?" July 2003 Ensign (sorry I tried to include the link but couldn't get it to work).

The advice in the article is very good.

This is very insidious because it is creeping into other books beyond your traditional romances too. Some genres that were clear of it in the past seem to be courting it now. Just a page or two here and there but it is getting in.

If you really don't want to give up fiction all together, or if it really is hard for you and it is tempting you, try teen fiction/young adult or even childrens. Some of the teen fiction is getting more risque but you can find good, clean authors there and in children's more frequently than in adult fiction. I know I have.

Good luck with your efforts.

- Ageless

Question #36834 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Regarding Board Question #36686, it is illegal in the State of Utah for any employee in a restaurant under the age of 21 to handle an alcoholic beverage as described here: http://www.alcbev.state.ut.us/license_permit/SUMMARY%20RESTAURANT%20full%20svc%2004.pdf

- trackgeek

Q:

Dear Maternity Uncoveraged (Board Question #36655),

My wife and I went through the same dilemma. First of all, to address your question about doctors visits: if you still live around Provo, the Student Health Center will see you even without insurance; you just pay $20/visit plus labs instead of $10/visit. If you don't live here, most cities have urgent care clinics etc that will take you without insurance, but it could be pricey. Now, about maternity coverage. As you probably know, BYU's student health plan with maternity coverage is insanely expensive. But we knew we needed something because according to friends and "the Google", just having the baby can cost more than $10000, and that's if there are no complications. And, if you do get pregnant without insurance, no health insurance you pick up after conception will cover the pregnancy because it is a pre-existing condition. Anyways, we checked with State Farm because they do all of our other insurance things. You should check with your insurance company, too. State Farm, for example, provides health insurance through Assurant at a discount. If you are still a student, they have a "Student Select" policy which can come with a maternity rider, and it's way cheap compared to BYU. If you're not a student, they can still help you out finding the best plan. You could also check www.ehealthinsurance.com for various quotes, and remember you're husband doesn't have to insured, it's just you. Obviously, we had to redo our budget and make some sacrifices, but my wife and I decided that it was better to be $1000-2000 a year safe than $10000 sunk--not to mention should we get pregnant, our baby deserves the best care possible which we probably wouldn't be able to provide on our own, out of pocket. So, I hope this is helpful.

-Helpful Dwarf

Question #36827 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

In (second) response to Board Question #36683. The sock question.

"Hoping to change the world" had a good thought, but most of the time you still have to tear open the top part of the bag in order to get into the bag to look at the socks.

If you think for a moment about bags you would realize that a lot of bags are more convenient if they are resealable. For instance, food items; if you had the choice between resealable or not you would probably go for resealable bags. Now imagine that you have socks that fit in the same size bag that a food item fits in, you would probably use the same bag so that you don't have to manufacture a new bag. Basically, Walmart probably does this because the manufacturing cost is cheaper.

Just a thought.

-Ilovewalmarthead

Question #36823 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Pumpkin Vigilante,

In regard to your Board Question #36462 congrats on being called to my hometown of Omaha, Nebraska. Here are some good things to know for your mission from a native.

1. In the fall on Husker game days Memorial Stadium become the third largest city in Nebraska. Everyone who isn't there is watching it on TV. So be forwarned, gametime = not the best time to tract.
2. We have the Mormon Trail Center, within the mission and the sisters run it. It is across the street from the Winter Quarters temple.
3. Having just talked to some missionaries this evening, many of the Elders are being instructed to get a bike. There are mission cars but often missionaries will be asking for rides to team-ups, etc. (I did that today.)
4. It's more hilly than you'd expect for the plains.
5. It's pop, not soda.
6. We kind of have a grid system as well. Name streets ex. Dodge Street, run East/West. Number streets run North/South ex. 144th Street. Intersection 144th and Dodge (Omaha Stake Center.)
7. The state motto is "The Good Life."

That's all I can think of at the moment. If you'd like to ask more, ask Just Another Cassio for my e-mail address.

Best of Luck in the Big O!

- Cinnamon

Question #36820 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

BYU sent my housing deposit back to me and the envelope containing a $100 check was unsealed. Do they do that all the time or am I just a fluke?

- glad his $100 stayed in the envelope

A: Dear George,

Sometimes the BYU letterhead envelopes' adhesive doesn't stick well, as I learned from experience after two years of working in an office on campus. You really have to glue them down. A lot of the mail I receive from BYU is unsealed, too, so it happens more than just with your check. Good thing it stayed in there!

-Kicks and Giggles
Question #36819 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it really possible for someone's eyes to change color along with their mood, or is it just an illusion based on lighting and surrounding colors?

- pippin galadriel moonchild

A: Dear pgm,

Nope, your eyes can't really change color. Your eye color is due primarily to the amount of melanin in the different parts of your eye (sometimes there are other pigments involved). Your eyes can't produce melanin quickly enough to change on a daily basis, let alone any time scale shorter than that. However, they can change with more sun exposure over a period of time, getting somewhat darker.

Environmental factors, like lighting and clothing color, can make a difference. However, some people claim specifically to have seen color changes that appear due to a change in mood.

After doing some more reading, I've pieced together a few ideas that may help to explain that. Someone pointed out that the color closest to your face will have the biggest effect on what color your eyes appear. Someone else guessed that increased blood flow might have something to do with it. Obviously your face is the color closest to your eyes; perhaps the color of your skin (more flushed, more pale, etc.) would account for perceived differences in eye color. And that does change with your mood. Other guesses I read included pupil dilation/contraction and the presence of tears (both of which also correlate with your emotional state). Any of those ideas seems plausible to me.

If you want to read what other Board writers have said about this in the past, check out Board Question #3317, Board Question #17634, and Board Question #3430.

—Laser Jock
Question #36815 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can an unusually large ammount of time spent in an overly-chlorinated pool contribute to body hair loss? What about sunburn?

Yours Truly,
(sunburned and cholrinated) Eponine

A: Dear Eponine,

I didn't find any indication that chlorine can contribute to a sunburn, but yes, it can weaken the hair follicle.

- Katya
Question #36809 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Before the begin of the U2 concert DVD (Live in Chicago) there is song playing in the stadium that I don't recognize. At the premiere of U23D (a 3D U2 concert film set for release in the Fall)at the Cannes Film Festival, the same song was playing. What is this song, who is it by, and why does U2 use it for such occasions?

- The Usual

A: Dear suspect,

The song is Wake Up by Arcade Fire. As far as I can tell, they use it because they like it and it pumps up the crowd. Apparently, U2 did not have a working relationship with them until after they started using the song.

-=Optimus Prime=-
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently returned from a road trip to Northern California. While driving through Nevada and California, I noticed stretches of freeway where signs stating something like "Patrolled by Aircraft" referring to the speed limit. My question is how do they do that? I never saw a plane in the sky. Would a plane radar a car that was speeding and then relay the info to a highway patrolman to pull them over? Isn't this an expensive way to enforce speed limits?

- Wary of Unidentified Flying Cops

A: Dear Larry,

First, read Board Question #17530, Board Question #17856, Board Question #15797, Board Question #36006, Board Question #26860, and Board Question #24942.

To answer your last question, yes, I imagine it is fairly expensive, which is why the airplanes are used infrequently. For most people, the threat of the possibility is enough to make them slow down at least a little.

-=Optimus Prime=-
Question #36802 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Which bears are best?

- JH as DS

A: Dear JH and DS,

The stuffed ones that I keep in my room.

~Krishna
A: Dear DS (a.k.a. JH),

Fact: Bears eat beets. Bears, beets, Battlestar Galactica.

- JH as DS, right back at you
A: Dear Junior High,

Polar.

Nike
Question #36800 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What reasoning did the Emerging Issues Task Force of the Financial Accounting Standards Board use that led them to decide that the events of September 11, 2001 would not be considered as "extraordinary" for accounting purposes?

-Anonymous

A: Dear Anonymous,

Back in October of 2001, Tim Lucas, Emerging Issues Task Force Chairman, said the following regarding their reasoning to not classify the events of September 11th as extraordinary:
"Because of the far-reaching effects of the September 11 events, coupled with a weakening economy that predated those events, it would be difficult to capture the resulting economic effects in companies' financial statements. As one example, the events impacted airlines in multiple ways. Air carriers were unable to fly for two days, suffered the effects of rerouting and initiated layoffs in anticipation of lower passenger demand. No single line item can capture all of those effects. Other companies representing a broad range of industries are experiencing similar impacts."
Another point brought on in the FASB News Release for 10/01/2001 states this:
"While the events of September 11 were certainly extraordinary, the financial reporting treatment that uses that label would not be an effective way to communicate the financial effects of those events and should not be used in this case. The EITF observed that the economic effects of the events were so extensive and pervasive that it would be impossible to capture them in any one financial statement line item. Any approach to extraordinary item accounting would include only a part—and perhaps a relatively small part—of the real effect of those tragic events. Readers of financial reports will be intensely interested in understanding the whole impact of the events on each company. The EITF concluded that showing part of the effect as an 'extraordinary item' would hinder, rather than help, effective communication."
So there you go. That's their reasoning. I think their rationale makes sense but keep in mind my opinion only has ACCT 200 to back me up. For more info you might want to try accounting guru Earl Stice or perhaps our friendly Norm Nemrow who should be returning from his mission very very soon.

-googler:
Question #36793 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you think Paris Hilton is the greatest force for good this world has ever seen?

- Superman, who can't compare

A: Dear Superman,

See Board Question #27950 and Board Question #2463. No, I'm not trying to put you off, I just think those questions are a good reflection of popular opinion (at least on the Board) about her.

Personally, I don't follow the lives of celebrities closely enough to say.

—Laser Jock
A: Dear Kal

A short time before your question posted I saw this article. So I have to argue that Paris Hilton is not the greatest force for good in society. But she, combining her powers with Lindsay Lohan, Britney Spears, and Nicole Ritchie as The Fantastic X-Talents: A Role-Model League of America, Avenging the Lack of Tabloid Material is the greatest force for good. Ever (yes, even better than your pets Krypto, Streaky, Comet, and Beppo).

-Humble Master
A: Dear Superman,

Obviously. Good is hot.

-Paris
A: Dear Superman,

You're completely insane.

-Yellow
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In all seriousness if i am planning on bringing a nice car to BYU should i fear marauding seniors who might try to do harm to it? I really dont want my car vandalized, and im really considering just leaving it home altogether.

- Starts with a B

A: Dear BMW,

I don't think car vandalism is a big problem here at BYU. There was one rash of them that I remember hearing about this last school year, but things like that are relatively rare, and it was actually only targeted at BYU-owned vehicles. It's probably one of the safest places you could bring your car, actually. On the other hand, you could also just leave it home for other reasons—quite a few people here don't have cars, and they're even less necessary if you're a freshman and will be living on campus (which it sounds like you might be). For more on that, see Board Question #34936.

—Laser Jock
A: Dear Starts with a B,

Laser Jock is right. Provo's property crime level is lower than the national average, which is quite rare for a city of its size. Fear of vandalism's no reason to leave the car at home.

- Katya
A: Dear,

Please enjoy the fact that when I first read through your question, I pictured a lot of geriatric folks keying a car and smashing eggs on the windshield.

Then I thought about high school seniors having some kind of silly celebration for graduation, and thinking that petty vandalism was a good way to top it off.

Frankly, I feel like at least the second option is more likely than disgruntled BYU seniors messing up freshman cars, if that's what you're worried about. Seniors may chuckle a bit as the new kids pass, but I think most can find other forms of entertainment.

Be more worried about clumsy drivers. They're much, much more likely to disfigure your car. And you run that risk anywhere.

-Uffish Thought

Question #36791 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does anybody know where to find tabs for the blues song "Six Strings Down"? I'd give you an artist but it was a tribute piece done for a passed away Stevie Ray Vaughn by a number of artists and sung by BB King.

Over the years(actually one year) i have searched and searched for this tab and found nothing but a poor transcription of the chords. I might be able to figure out the solos by ear using the chords but im positive im not that good. Any help finding this tab would be awesome, i wouldnt be surprised if you cannot though, i have searched long and hard for a good transcription of the solos and intro and found nothing at all.
Good luck and godspeed 100 hour board.

-Garnish

A: Dear George,

I couldn't find much either, but it looks like this site will let you buy a transcription of a recording. That should be accurate and helpful for what you're looking for, if you want to pay the money.

-Kicks and Giggles
Question #36789 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you think that Harry Potter (the character, not the series) possesses a tragic flaw (the sort of flaw to which I refer is called hamartia,I believe, in the Greek tragedies--the hybris of Oedipus, for example)? If so, what do you think it is?

- Severus Snape

A: Dear Severus

The most notable incident in which Harry essentially failed due to his own faults is book five, in which Harry rashly decides to launch a rescue mission, when nobody is, in fact, in danger. It is even pointed out before he acts that he has "a saving people thing." Harry doesn't plan very well, he is much more likely to leap into any situation where he feels he is needed, even if nobody else agrees (Dumbledore has had to restrain him a few times from acting). This flaw was first explicitly pointed out in book four, I think (feel free to know of earlier instances) when Harry tries to save all the captives, instead of just rescuing Ron during the second task. So Harry's flaw is acting impetuously, without planning or knowledge of the situation.

-Humble Master
A: Dear Severus,

I'll agree with Humble Master that Harry can be too impulsive, but I don't know that I'd call it a "tragic flaw," exactly. For one thing Harry's impulsiveness has saved people's lives, as well. For another thing, it's Voldemort and his followers who have put Harry's life at risk, not Harry's own personality flaws. (Humble Master's got a good point about Book 5, though. In that one volume, alone, I can see calling Harry a "tragic hero," in the classic Aristotelian sense.)

- Katya
A: Professor Snape,

Harry's tragic flaw is an inability to listen to orders or take counsel from his elders. Time and time again Dumbledore or whoever counsels Harry one way and responds the opposite way, because he knows better than they, and they don't understand what it means to be Harry Potter. Arrogance is part of this flaw as well.

Keep the Faith.

-St. Jerome
A: Dear Professor with an abnormally large nose,

I would not say that Harry possesses a tragic flaw; I would say that Harry is a teenager. Being a teenager is inherently laced with flaws. Book 5 (as we have pointed out already) is the obvious choice to see poor teenage choices coming in to play. You will notice that in book 6, Harry starts learning from his mistakes and starts "growing up." Now, he's still got his flaws and a "saving complex." (please note how he broke up with Ginny just to "save" her. But let's be honest—Voldemort and Co. already know that Harry has got a thing for her. She's already a perfect target.) But I wouldn't say that they're "tragic flaws."

- Niffler
Question #36788 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the difference between curtains and drapes?

- Blinds

A: Dear Blinds,

The great debates of Curtain vs. Drapes. I remember those well. It was quite the storm here on the Board back in '93. I hope to not incite those riots again but willingly provide some information for you.

HGTV.com features this article on their website by Jennifer Huskey regarding window treatments. Here's what she says:
"Ready-made curtain panels are the norm in home stores. Usually hung from clip rings, tab-tops or a rod pocket casing, they're available in different lengths and widths to fit a variety of window sizes. Unlined and lightweight, they're the alternative to formal custom-made draperies, which are usually lined, pleated and constructed to fit the exact dimensions of a window. If draperies are not attached to the rod with rings, they are usually hung on traverse rods, allowing the panels to be opened and closed with a cord that hangs behind the fabric."
I can see the difference there but her wording is a little unclear to me. Let me refer you to another site, Improve.net, where they define the difference like this:
"Custom curtains are shorter, perhaps not reaching the floor, and are made of lighter materials. Often times, curtains are usually functional (they open and close). Draperies are rooted in the decorative vs. the functional custom curtains. These normally come to the floor and flank curtains on either side. These are normally lined, and are made with heavy fabrics such as velvet or heavy cotton."
That's much clearer for me and it's backed up by Better Homes and Gardens:
"Curtains are made of lightweight fabrics and most often are unlined and operable. Draperies extend to the floor, tend to be lined, and are sewn of heavier fabric."
So despite Wikipedia grouping the two terms together. Take a hint from the decorating experts remember that DRAPES = DECORATION while CURTAINS = FUNCTION. I hope that helps!

-googler:
Question #36787 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How come they still haven't invented jet packs?

- Hoverboard

A: Dear hb,

Have you SEEN The Rocketeer??

Watch that and ask again.

-Olympus
A: Dear Hoverboard,

Is it just me, or is this situation remarkably like that of the proverbial pot calling the kettle black?

-Yellow
A: Dear Hoverboard,

"They" have. I see a couple of different options with regards to Jet Pack for you. This first and perhaps more bulky option includes either a platform you stand on or two industrial sized fans strapped onto your shoulders. Sounds a little bulky I know. Another option you might have in the future is seen here on enGadget.com. This is a true rocket pack that weighs about 90 lbs. and can propel a 200 pound pilot for about 5 minutes. It looks awesome and the creator wants to get it to have a 4 mile range but the sad thing is that once it's in production you'll have to shell out a good $200,000 to take it home.

Lastly, check out the Wikipedia article. Maybe you can get some ideas from the past to inspire your own future variation on the theme.

-googler:
A: Dear Hoverboard

I saw something about jetpacks on the Discovery channel. The military invented them, it had footage and everything, but they could only go about 15 to 20 seconds before they ran out of fuel (and they only went about 20 feet in the air, so don't think this is The Rocketeer or anything).

-Humble Master
Question #36786 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who killed Tupac?

- Not me.

A: Dear George,

We may never know. Due to lack of much effort in the investigations after his death, no one was ever accused or arrested for the shooting. It was a drive-by shooting, so pinpointing an assailant hasn't been easy.

There are, however, many theories, including that rival The Notorious B.I.G. orchestrated the attack. Another theory is that Orlando "Baby Lane" Anderson, a member of the Southside Crips, and who Tupac had beat up earlier that night, was responsible. The Wikipedia article has some interesting reading about the many theories and possibilities of who is responsible. Especially check out the headings "September 1996 Shooting" and "Theories of the Crime."

-Kicks and Giggles
Question #36779 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Optimus Prime,

Are you aware that Mr. Potato Head has stolen your identity and is now masquerading as one "Optimash Prime"? What will you do about this terrible crime?

- katydid

A: Dear katydo,

First they do it to Spiderman and now they have to tarnish my good name, too? At least R2D2 is kind of shaped like a potato!

I'll bet my new toy is way cooler than that... hmmm... actually, it looks kind of clunky compared to the original.

I guess I could just stomp on the potato guy with my huge clunky feet, but really, I don't think anyone's going to confuse him for me. Being the peace-loving good guy that I am, I'm going to let him be for now, but if you see Optimash trying anything funny, you just let me know. I still have that huge gun.

-=Optimus Prime=-
Question #36777 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some of your favorite "feel good" type books? (The Scriptures being, obviously, the best ones in the world)

- Free Rain, who likes to lose herself in the library

A: Dear Free,

Salinger. Always makes me feel better. Or at least more angsty.

-Whistler
A: Dear Free Rain,

Ha. I couldn't disagree more. Don't get me wrong - j'adore J. D. Salinger. But he's not your typical "feel good" writer.

It looks like you're looking for lighter or warmer stuff. I could recommend to you the book I'm reading this very moment, The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear by Walter Moers - it's endlessly whimsical and charming. I could recommend to you any number of C.S. Lewis books (Perelandra, The Screwtape Letters, and The Great Divorce being my favorites), I could and would highly recommend to you the Douglas Adams books. But I've said it before and I'll say it again - no (secular) book has ever made me feel as good or as deeply as The Little Prince.

-krebscout
A: Dear Free Rain,

When I first read this question, I thought you were talking about [feel good] [type books]—books on type or typography that make you feel good, I guess.

As for [[feel good]-type] books, I like books by Shel Silverstein, A.A. Milne, and Bill Watterson. (And if you really did want [feel good] [type books], I'd recommend Stop Stealing Sheep, The Elements of Typographic Style, and The Art of Looking Sideways.)

- Katya
A: Dear,

I have so many! Many are kids' books. The Ramona series, for instance, Phantom Tollbooth, and so on. But I also like others, things like Cyrano de Bergerac and Scarlet Pimpernel and any of the Mrs. Pollifax books. Most of Terry Pratchett's books. Most of Joan Aiken's children's' books. And of course, I can't recommend any of P.G. Wodehouse's novels highly enough.

Mainly, my 'feel' good books are easy, fun reads that are great time and time again.

-Uffish Thought
Question #36776 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have searched the archive for "delivery pizza" and "delivery Chinese" and have not found the question at hand. So here goes:

Which came first, delivered pizza or delivered Chinese food? And why is it that these two items are the primary (and almost solely) delivered meals? I know that there are sandwich deliveries these days, and there are such places as "Steak Out" and "Meals on Wheels" but why hasn't any other food really caught on in the delivery world? I mean, if someone says they want to "order in" food you automatically think of Pizza or Chinese, right?

And when did regular restaurant delivery become commonplace?

Also, as a sidenote, I think that pizza is THE primarily delivered food. I would guess that more people have pizzas delivered (or ordered for take-out) than there are people eating in a pizzeria. Chinese food cannot say the same thing.Would you say this is accurate?

- So Many Questions - So Much Food

A: Dear So Many Questions

There were indeed quite a few questions in there. I'll do my best to answer them. According to this site the first pizza delivery was in 1889, when the queen of Italy "was eager to try the faddish new dish but couldn't deign to visit a pizza joint, so she ordered in." In the U.S. pizza deliveries started up in the 1950s, with Domino's Pizza really being the first to make it a viable business model.

Now I could not find any hard information about when Chinese food delivery started, but if Domino's was the first restaurant to find a profitable method of home delivery, I'd assume pizza delivery came first.

As for your last question...yes (I flipped a coin).

-Humble Master

-more to come
Question #36775 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the last "new" thing that you learned in your regular church meetings? I'm not talking about spiritual experiences, I mean random facts and stories that you didn't know before. Ones hidden in less-read books of scripture or quotes from less "popular" general authorities. Not speculations, either, but backed-up facts or passages taken directly from the scriptures. The kind that make you go, "Huh. . .I didn't know that!" It's ok if it is something everyone else knew and you didn't, because that's why you have aliases, right?

- Judas, Chief Financial Officer (John 12:6)

A: Dear Judas,

I learned what the responsibilities of each of the quorums of the seventies are. (But now I've forgotten again. I remember that three through five are area authorities, and that they don't ever get called on to speak in General Conference, but I don't remember the specific responsibilities of one and two.)

- Katya
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the favourite flavour of ice-cream held by the good people of BYU Academic Advisement? I want to bring them ice-cream, see, and I don't know what kind to bring.

- Definitely not a writer

A: Dear Hobbes,

Cookies and Cream. But only because they've never tasted Lemon Chiffon Pie.

-Tangerine
Question #36772 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So we just found out we're having a baby boy. My husband and his family are thrilled as this will be the first grandson for them (we are the last chance to carry on the family name). As such, his father just annouced, and he agreed, that the name should be very Irish (Irish immigrants two generations back). Personally, I'm cool with Irish names, but the only one the husband has put out yet has been Sean, which I'm fine with being a middle name--in fact, I would love for it to be a middle name--but I'm not keen on having for a first name. What are some good, normal sounding, not-weird (Angus? Baz? No.), masculine (no Finnians allowed), non-K or C (surname conflict), Irish names?

- I'm more Scottish than Irish, but I'll let it go this once.

A: Dear forgiving Scot,

I suggest Aidan, Braden, Brendan/Brandon, Brian, Darren, Dillon/Dylan, Emmet, Ennis, Liam, Niall/Neil, Patrick, Quinn, Reilly/Riley, Ronan, Ryan, or Tierney. Of those, my favorites are "Liam" and "Patrick."

- Katya
Question #36771 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

You know that commercial where it was like how many licks does it take to get to the center of a tootsie pop? And the owl is all one, two, and then bites it at three? Was I the only one who thought the answer really was three?!

-I found a star once

A: Dear only once???,

Umm... I'm going to vote yes.

Well, no. I'm sure that somewhere out there, (beneath the pale blue sky.... er... anyway...) I'm sure that someone out there thought the same thing. But it wasn't me.

That's okay. We like you anyway.

-Yellow
A: My dear,

I just kinda thought the owl was obnoxious.

But Yellow is right! We DO like you anyway!

- The Defenestrator
Question #36770 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the most number of questions one person asked in a day? Is there a limit to that? I find myself asking one question which reminds me of something else. You know how sometimes you wonder about something and you think I'm going to WIKIPEDIA that later? Now I think I should ask the board that later

- Cougar Girl

A: Dear Cougar Girl,

See Board Question #36076.

- the librarian
Question #36769 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What percentage of BYU students do you think read the board or are aware that the board even exists?

- Anonymous

A: Dear Anonymous,

We have around 2,000 registered readers. If all of those were BYU students, that would represent about 7% of the student body. Of course, not all of our readers are current BYU students (or have ever attended BYU), so I suspect that the number is much lower. (On the other hand, this number doesn't take into account unregistered readers.)

Toasteroven wrote in Board Question #12165 that he thought the number was as high as 20%. In Board Question #9398, Duchess thought the number was more like 0.02% (but that was in 2004). My guess is that the current number is around 1-2%, and that the Board booth has helped out significantly.

- Katya
Question #36768 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do people say summer term is more fun than fall/winter semesters? Is summer term more fun than spring? Why/why not? I would think it would be worse because of the efy kids...

- I am really curious about this one

A: Dear,

I like the weather, the relaxed atmosphere, the fact that you have a few classes you focus on in-depth, that there are fewer students, (EFY's a pain, but it's really not worse than the hordes of students in Fall/Winter, and they're considerably more fun to make fun of,) that people are always out playing frisbee and barbecuing, rent is lower.

It's a combination between school and summer vacation. You still get the fun and relaxation, but you still have a lot of work to do. I like that kind of workload better anyway, though, so I don't mind much.

Basically, I agree that summer's much nicer. It's a little lower-stress, a little more fun, for me. Come try it out.

-Uffish Thought
A: Dear curious,

Romance. Enough said'

-Castle in the Sky
Question #36767 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I've been doing online research into generic forms of birth control. Although my pharmacist and doctor tell me they should be the same as name brands, a lot of people I've talked to (and have read about online) seem to have had really bad experiences. What is the true difference between generics and brand name medicine? Is it like the difference between Rice Krisppies and the store brand Crispy Rice Cereal? Or is it a more severe difference like the difference between....an Ipod and a... Mp3 Player? Sorry this is so long.

- Which Tri?

A: My dear,

Generic medications are exactly the same as their brand-name counterparts. They have the same chemical makeup. The only difference is advertising. That is why doctors will prescribe the generic—it's not bad for their patients.

For example, I am on azathioprine for my Crohn's disease. The brand name medication for this is Imuran. Azathioprine is the drug name. Imuran IS azathioprine. Make sense?

Or, for a more common example: Ibuprofen is the drug name for Advil. My family just buys ibuprofen, because it's exactly the same thing. Exactly the same drug. (Just look at the ingredients list!)

Now, with herbal supplements, or anything like that, you can't necessarily count on different brands to be the same. They are not regulated by the FDA. But I can tell you that a generic medication that your doctor prescribes for you will be the same as its brand name counterpart.

Actually, I would be misleading you if I said there is no difference, because there is: cost. :)

- The Defenestrator
Question #36765 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Why do some people have little divets in their faces? You know what I mean? Those little hole things in their faces that are like inverse pimples? What are they? I know some young people who have them (like 18 year olds) so I don't know what the heck they are. But they are freaky looking!!!!1 This isn't medical advice, luckily I don't have them but I do know someone who has it and I can't ask her what it is without offending her

A: Dear ?,

I really hope you're not talking about dimples.

-Curious Physics Minor
A: My dear,

I believe you're thinking of pockmarks, which are basically pitlike scars left from eruptive diseases like smallpox. Also, acne can create the same type of scarring.

Thank you for not asking your friend what they are. It would be a bit tactless to do so. ("Hey, what's that on your FACE?!") And I hope you don't spend too much time worrying about it either...really—it's not important in the least! :)

- The Defenestrator
Question #36764 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you have stairs in your house?

It is a mystery...

A: Dear it is?,

Yes.

-Olympus
A: Dear It,

Yes.

-Curious Physics Minor
A: My dear,

No, but we do have a folding ladder to the attic.

- The Defenestrator
A: Dear Mystery

Yes (but let me make special mention of Dragon Lady's house, which has the coolest stairs in history).

-Humble Master
Question #36762 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I heard a rumor that the jogging classes don't really meet every time. What do you know about the summer term classes?

I already read the syllabus that talks about failing due to absences.

- seven or eight

A: Dear seven,

I took Jogging over Winter semester. We met every day for about the first half of the semester. After that we only met half the time. But I don't know what it will be like during Summer term.

-Curious Physics Minor
Question #36761 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Board,

Why does Curiouser and Curiouser want to know what happened to me after winter semester? I suppose the name should give me a hint, but it seems like there is usually some sort of reason behind it. is she a girl who wants to date me? is he a boy who wants to fight me? just curious...

- bismark

A: Dear bismark,

Or both? ...Awwkwarrd.

- Lavish
A: My dear,

How should I know?

Gosh, THAT was an easy question to answer...

- The Defenestrator
A: Dear bismark,

Red hair.

-Tangerine
A: Dear Defenestrator,

Because you're omniscient, that's how. Answer the boy's question - don't hold out on the kid.

Dear bismark,

Both. This was a brother/sister set, actually. The girl (Curiouser), who shall heretofore be known as Hot Sauce, has known you since childhood and is actually your betrothed, if you didn't know. Both your parents arranged your marriage years ago, but her brother doesn't approve (something about NASCAR and a dental bill), and has always sought your demise. (You may remember him from homeroom, 7th grade. The lunch money kid.)

Unbeknownst to you, that *Croatian arms deal went bad. Guess what! Hot Sauce's brother, Picante Rio (Curiouser - You know him as Raw Throat), was your contact. You thought you had it bad when it was just the Indy 500 sore spot - now, your life could be a pulp in his hands if you aren't careful.

Hot Sauce may be your one saving grace, here. She is holding something over Picante Rio's head that should keep you alive for another 48 hours. I can't release that information at this time, but I think you need no explanation.

Having risked too much already, I can only leave you with a solid wish of luck. Let us know how all that goes for you.

-Olympus

*omniscient
Question #36759 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I got an email from the BYU Lost & Found telling me they had found something of mine. I'd really like to know what it is, but I am not in Provo at the moment. Responding to their email at lost-found@byu.edu gave me a "delivery status failure" message. Can you find an email address for the L&F that works?

-Portia

A: Dear Portia,

I'd recommend calling 801-422-INFO and just getting transferred there. Unless you're not in the country or something, you can explain your situation and see what can be done.

-Olympus
A: Dear Portia,

Try lostandfound@byu.edu. That's what's listed in the BYU Department Directory.

-Yellow
Question #36757 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Castle,

When are we ever going to play Wii?

- misses the days of CS 142

A: Dear student of mine,

I don't know! But if you email me at castle (dot) in (dot) the (dot) sky @ theboard.byu.edu you have a much better chance. :)

-Castle in the Sky
Question #36752 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear Yellow,

I noticed in Board Question #36616 that you quoted a Calvin and Hobbes. I also know that this particular Calvin and Hobbes was recently posted on a bulletin board in the Tanner building. Are you a frequenter of said bulletin board?

-lekker lekker

A: Dear lekker lekker,

Actually, I'm not. I'm just a frequenter of Calvin and Hobbes books. This works out well, as my roommate is an owner of Calvin and Hobbes books. However, I'm afraid I haven't been in the Tanner building in nearly two months now. I'm glad, though, to hear that they're choosing the right over there (as evidenced by their choice of comic.)

Smile!

-Yellow
Question #36750 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

You know in the old Bugs Bunny cartoons from the 40s and 50s, etc. how they had great sound effects for what was being seen on screen? Whenever a character is punched or kicked, there is a specific, hard popping sound. It cracks me up every time I hear it because it's so perfect. How would you guess that sound is/was made? Seriously, now.

- Angry, Serious Smurf

A: Dear Angry Smurf

I'm glad you've asked this question. I have the Golden Collections of Looney Tunes DVDs, and I've been meaning to get around to watching the special features. There is one called "Crash! Bang! Boom!: The Wild Sounds of Treg Brown" (it's on the second disc of Volume 2 of the Looney Tunes Golden Collection if you want to rent the DVD to watch the featurette). Really, Treg Brown is pretty much solely responsible for the sounds that always make you laugh (his library of sound effects is still used in modern Warner Brother cartoons (such as Animaniacs and the (critically panned) Looney Tunes film)). I'm going to transcribe the parts of the featurette which is most applicable to your query. Let's start with a quote from Ben Burtt, a director/sound designer:
Usually the kind of sound effects that you heard in the earliest cartoons were strictly sound effects produced by musical instruments. What happened with Treg Brown was entirely different. He would bring in sounds that were recorded in the [sound] library at Warner Brothers. If someone came to a quick stop he'd put in a car skid from a Jimmy Cagney gangster movie that they had recorded. If someone was hit on the head and flew out the window there'd be a thunderclap followed by the sound of a biplane in a spin recorded for Dawn Patrol. It was this imposition of realistic sounds into the fantasy world of the cartoons that gave them comic impact.
Friz Freleng, a director of many of the Looney Tunes cartoons also says
We got sound effects that were unusual because Treg would try anything. The more offbeat they were the funnier they were.
Mark Kausler, a producer says:
[Treg] went out into the field and he recorded things on a tape recorder and transfered those to film loops, and he would build a whole sound effects library on film.
It is related that, for instance, in a cartoon that featured a bull fight, Treg recorded actual audiences at a bull fight in Barcelona, and also recorded real bull sounds. Eugene Marks, who was a music editor who worked with Treg says:
I think it was [Treg's]imagination on the stage where we would record these effects. He had a very famous cabinet, and inside that cabinet was a myriad of what you and I might call junk. And he had such a wild imagination that he could create any kind of sound from what he had.
Now for some specific examples (quote from Ben Burtt):
The Roadrunner had his little tongue blips [beep beep]. Treg said that they were produced by just snapping his finger in the top of a coke bottle. There was this character, a kangaroo, that appeared in a number of cartoons, that had this twangy bounce to its feet. Treg produced that by taking a fingernail file, a metal fingernail file, over the edge of a table and twanging it. You could move the file such that more of it or less of it hung out over the table to vary the pitch. [In a Roadrunner cartoon in which flames are seen chasing a trail of dust across wide shots of roads] the sounds there are a flamethrower roar, combined with the Dawn Patrol airplanes and an old motorcycle that's in the Warner's sound library sped up.
So there it is. A combination of library sound effects, live sounds recorded on location, and prop sounds made in a room. In the featurette they discuss how the sound effects were a part of the scores for the cartoons, and Brown and the composers would work together to make sure everything worked in harmony (I have so much respect for the work that went into those classic cartoons).

-Humble Master
Question #36748 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

You guys are officially the coolest thing ever! I was researching BYU on Wilkepedia a week or so ago, and the 100 Hour Board was linked to it. Curiosity got the better of me and ever since, I have been checking in everyday to see what's new. Then today finally became a registered reader! So, here is my question/story: Everyone in my ward is always quoting The Princess Bride. I've never seen it though. It was introduced to me the same time as Monty Python and the Holy Grail and I felt I could have gone my entire life without seeing that. So, whats the deal with The Princess Bride? What is it about? Most importantly, is it work my time?

- Ninja Sorceress

A: Dear Ninja Sorceress,

The Princess Bride is millions of times better than Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Monty Python is, for all intents and purposes, a collection of related skits with no real interconnecting plot, some of which are rather crude. You could remove any scene and the rest of the movie would be essentially unaffected. I've wondered if it wasn't created as a study in how not to make a movie; it has gratingly irritating seizure-inducing opening credits, there is very little interaction between characters, there is no plot development, and nobody ever gets close to the holy grail. Oh, and lets not forget the part where there's no ending. It just stops. There are a few scenes in Monty Python that I think are worth watching, but there's absolutely no reason that they need to be watched in context. In all actuality, there is no context.

The Princess Bride, on the other hand, is an adaptation of a very well-written novel. It has strong character development, a real plot, humorous moments that relate to the story, protagonists, antagonists, plot twists, and is completely family-appropriate. It's one of my favorite movies, and was, in fact, part of my first date.

A quick summary from IMDB in order to actually address your first question:
When a young boy falls ill, his grandfather pops round to visit him. To cheer his grandson up, Grandpa has brought a storybook; The Princess Bride, a tale of the love between the beautiful Buttercup and the besotted Westley, a love cruelly interrupted by Westley's tragic apparent death at sea when seeking his fortune. Heartbroken, Buttercup has sworn never to love again, but accepts the marriage proposal of the rich and handsome Prince Humperdinck, heir to the throne of Florin; but death is no barrier to true love, and in a story filled with exotically-accented swordsmen, big-hearted giants, genius kidnappers, sadistic torturers, vile swamps, Rodents of Unusual Size, the Dread Pirate Roberts and a somewhat embittered miracle worker, the love between Westley and Buttercup twists and turns on a path filled with adventure. Will the True Love of Westley and Buttercup win the day? Will Inigo Montaya find the six-fingered man who murdered his father? Will Humperdinck's evil plans come to fruition? And, more importantly, will Grandpa be able to tell the story without any of the yucky kissing?
See? I told you there was a plot.

-Yellow
A: Dear Busy Girl,

It's only now that we're officially the coolest? I thought someone in HR took care of that a long time ago. The boys upstairs aren't going to be happy.

Is The Princess Bride worth your time? Well, only if you like a movie with comedy, romance, suspense, danger, intrigue, drama, fascinating characters and daring escapes. If you don't like any of those things, steer far from the movie. However, it's hilarious. I love it. Go for it.

Nike
A: Dear Ninja Sorceress (awesome name)

It is a very rare thing when a film is made that is praised by all genders and age groups. Princess Bride is such a film, and it deserves its praise. Enough romance for the women-folk, enough action for the men-folk. Enough broad humor for the youth, enough pointed barbs for the enlightened, educated viewers. And nothing to offend. Really, not too shabby a film. I say it is very much worth your time, Ninja Sorceress, now go forth and view!

-Humble Master
Question #36731 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Any suggestions for a birthday party for a two year old? Keep in mind that it is 110 degrees outside and almost all attendees will be adult relatives.

- George

A: Dear George

Cake. Gifts for the birthday werf. Perhaps pizza (I don't mean to be snarky, but when attending birthday parties for my young nieces and nephews, those seem to be the key items. The adults tend to entertain themselves with conversation, and the kid gets excited about cake and gifts (usually there's a theme to the birthday werf's liking...Dora the Explorer...Spider-Man...The Godfather Trilogy Star Wars...Disney Princesses...the writings of Emmanuel Kant...)).

-Humble Master
Question #36730 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So it's come to my attention recently that I can't stand fiction novels. Actually, I don't really care for a lot of fictional movies or TV shows or anything of the sort. It just seems useless to me to be reading/watching a story about people who don't exist and hearing about fantasy-type stuff that just came out of somebody's head one day. I don't know why. I just don't get into that stuff.

But whenever I tell people I'm not interested in these kinds of things, they make it out to be some sort of problem that I have. There must be something wrong with me if I don't care to read Twilight or Harry Potter or watch the latest blockbuster superhero movie. People keep telling me that I'm missing out on so much great literature and all these wonderful things, but I really just have no interest at all. On my list of priorities, I can think of about 15,000 things I would rather do, read, or see.

So what am I supposed to say to these people?

I've taken a lot of crap from my roommates for not reading Twilight like ALL the rest of them, but when I try and promote books like Walden (which I love!), they just fire back and tell me I have weird taste or tell me how much they hate that stupid book.

I don't know, it's just starting to get old, and I'm getting tired of people telling me I'm weird. Maybe I just lost my imagination somewhere along the way...

-Frustrated with Fiction

A: Dear Frustrated,

Yup, sounds like you've lost your imagination somewhere along the way. People enjoy fiction reading because it allows you to escape from reality and immerse yourself in a world which is generally much more exciting than ours. That's not to say that non-fiction reading is not as good, I enjoy lots of non-fiction as well as fiction, it just isn't quite the same. As for what you should say to them, I don't know. Just play it off as silly, "Yah, I'm broken like that [shrug]."

-Curious Physics Minor
A: Dear dear dear Freyja,

I completely understand where you're coming from. However, I think some of your problem might actually be with fantasy, not fiction itself.

There's nothing wrong with you; your tastes are just different. I really love memoir-type writing, so I read a lot of memoirs. I have also found that there is a wealth of fiction that feels like a memoir, so I spend a lot of time with those kinds of books (such as The Poisonwood Bible, Gilead, or The Secret Life of Bees. If you feel like you're broken for not liking fiction, find some fiction that feels right to you and fits your tastes. I guarantee it's out there.

As far as nonfiction goes, I think there's just as much literary value in nonfiction works as there is in fiction. Henry David Thoreau is, in fact, one of my heroes. There's much divide in the publishing world as to what should be more highly valued: popular, easy reading material, or the writing that shows great genius and has true cultural merit. In all of my literature and editing class, I still cannot find an answer to that question, but I do know this: any reader has a right to indulge his or her own tastes. So go for it, and tell everybody else that your taste is just different than theirs. It's not a big deal, and they (or you) shouldn't make it one.

Stick it to the man and read whatever you want, not whatever's on the latest best-seller list.

-Kicks and Giggles

p.s. for more discussion on this topic or for book recommendations, please email me at kicks(dot)and(dot)giggles(at)theboard(dot)byu(dot)edu
A: Dear F,

There's nothing wrong with you. If you've read or watched some good fiction and it wasn't your thing, then people should just be able to leave you alone about it. If they really keep bugging you, just make a deal that you'll read one fiction book for them for every nonfiction book they read for you. Then throw something like Gödel, Escher, Bach at them.

- Katya
Question #36720 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite youtube videos with kids being cute? What do you think of the "landlord" one? Is it wrong for those parents to teahc that girl to swear? it's really funny but... I know I shouldn't laugh at it.

- Pearl

A: Dear Pirate Ship,

The only one I'm familiar with is this one, but it's pretty good.

I've only heard about the "landlord" one, but it doesn't sound too appealing to me. Listening to people cuss makes me uncomfortable, no matter how old they are. So yes, I think it's wrong.

-=Optimus Prime=-
A: Dear Pearl,

I like this one. Courtesy of my former roommate and her boss. haha.

My other former roommate is a YouTube guru, and she suggested this one. A little long, but pretty funny.

Also, I agree with -=Optimus Prime=-.

-Olympus
Question #36714 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Okay...a whole slew of questions mostly unrelated. I'm graduating from high school in two weeks, the next week I'll be at BYU for summer term. What sort of things do I need to do? Like an ID or signature card or something? I don't really. know. Where do I get those? Do I need to have medical records? Anything along the random-just-getting-started-at-BYU-info would be great.

Also, I'm very excited to be leaving high school. I don't mean to be mean, but I won't miss anyone from high school. I have a lot of friends, but I won't miss them. I just won't. But there's this one guy I will miss immensly. We're really good friends. (That's it) He makes me happy. I don't know how, but he posesses that quality. He makes me happy by just standing there. But I'm pretty sure I don't create the same sensation in him. Of course, he doesn't know how he makes me feel. Its not that I'm madly in love with him, he just makes me smile. I will miss him SO much. But like I said, I don't think he feels the same for me. What do I do about leaving him? Tell him? Get over it and move on? Nothing? Insight would be greatly appreciated. Thank you

- Flower

A: Dear Fleur,

No worries. Coming to BYU is easy. You should attend New Student Orientation. Here's a schedule of how that goes.
They'll take care of all of that for you and make it easy and fun. The rest really depends on you. If you've never lived away from home before it would be a good time to ask some basic questions:

1) Can you clean?
2) Can you cook? (only really applies if you are in off campus housing)
3) Can you do laundry? Ironing?
4) If you were left in the woods and three giant panda bears were surrounding you in an equilateral triangle and one of them was wounded at which angle would you run to survive the longest?
5) Have you browsed over BYU's site?
6) Is there anyone out here you know?
7) Do you have health insurance? They'll be able to access your records. You don't need to carry them around.

Now, the boy issue. You say you're "really good friends." It sounds like you ARE madly in love with him or at least you really really really like who he is. So... tell him something! Are you ok with looking back a year from now knowing you didn't do anything? What do you really have to lose? What's the worse that could happen? Doesn't seem like you really stand to lose much to me. You say you're "really good friends." Worse comes to worse: he runs away from you screaming like a deranged lunatic. See? If there were to happen at least you found out that he's CRAZY and you realize a relationship with a crazy person is just not going to work.

Suggestions:
1) Tell him!
2) Be blunt and honest. I think life is just too short to beat around the bush. Will you ever see this guy again?
3) Tactful: you don't need to BURY him in reasons WHY you like him. A simple "hey -----, you know I really like you" in a sincere manner means a lot.
4) If you feel really bold, a dinner invitation would be awesome. I don't know a guy that would turn down a dinner date, it's not overly-forceful, and it gives him a chance to consider things a little more. My seminary teacher claims that she got noticed by her now-husband for the chocolate chip cookies she made him when he was sick. I believe it. Quickest way to a man's heart is the stomach (to my beautiful girlfriend: * hint hint * :P, to my beautiful girlfriend's mother: you're amazing... those peanut butter cookies.. wow. I owe you big time.)

I can only guarantee you one thing: if he's a friend of yours and you nicely tell him how you feel, no matter what, he'll be flattered. It might take him a while to realize this but I've never met anyone who, even when they're not interested, isn't slightly delighted or their heart skips a beat when they realize a member of the opposite sex finds them charming, attractive, and fun to be around.

-Castle in the Sky
Question #36687 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a question about the patches of grass in the terraced garden area on the south end of campus. Would a person get in trouble for sitting/laying on those nicely labeled grass samples? Thanks.

- My husband likes to lay in off-limits grass

A: Dear PDA-inclined,

Oh yes, we figured you and your husband out. The gig is up. This has nothing to do with just laying in unadulterated grass or "breaking the rules". You just wanted us to find you a good spot for PDA. Well, no fears! Red Team is here to provide! First off, we sat on the grass. Yep, we did. We rolled on it, laid on it, stood on it, and DEFINITELY sat on it not making out. And no one got in trouble. No one. One elite member of Red Team (depressed that the hallowed ground was considered so unimportant) was even observed screaming at the top of his lungs "I'm on the grass!" and NO ONE, I repeat NO ONE, attempted to intervene. And, to top it off, there are NO signs prohibiting said sitting/laying/making out on the grass.

So we offer two suggestions. One: Buffalo Grass. This grass is amazing and, of all the grasses is definitely the best for making out, it is fun and wispy-feeling when you run it through your fingers. It should be good for cuddling or any other form of decent PDA you choose to engage in.

Buffalo Grass

So, after you are done working out or making out and you need a little time to cool off we recommend the Rough Bluegrass. It doesn't look comfortable but it has a softness to it that is undeniably appealing PLUS it will allow for excellent ventilation because it doesn't grow as thick.

Rough BlueGrass

And here is your picture as proof that, yes, that we really did test out the grass. We saved the kissing part for you two.

Testing out the Grass

The Red Team
Question #36352 posted on 06/11/2007 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a question about Yoo-hoo (the chocolate drink). I suddenly opened the freezer one day and there were some boxes (like the drink boxes) of Yoo-hoo in there. I found out which of my roommates it belonged to and my other roommates and I were kind of confused that she would put Yoo-hoo in the freezer, but we just kind of went along with it. Well, today I was talking to this guy at my work and I told him that my roommate drinks Yoo-hoo (although apparently she eats it frozen) and he was like, "Where did she get it?? You can't get it in Utah." Well, I am not from Utah and back where I live you can get it, but I don't really have the urge to drink Yoo-hoo, so I have never tried to buy it here in Utah. I was confused because my roommate who drinks it is from Utah and I wondered where she got it if she can't get it in Utah. So here is the question: Can you buy Yoo-hoo in Utah? and if not, where do you think my roommate got it?
Also, after doing a little bit of research (like 2 min.) I found out that Yoo-hoo never goes bad....so why is she putting it in the freezer?

- Confused soda drinker not from Utah

A: Dear Really Confused,

We confirm that Yoohoo is available (as of today) at Walmart in the back next to the rest of the drinks. So you can buy it in Utah.

Since Yoohoo is fake chocolate milk you can freeze it just like water and it will stay cold longer but not lose its flavor like milk does.

High Definition Cell Phone Images:

Yoohoo: Fake Chocolate Milk
($2.82 price tag)
Yoohoo: Expensive Fake Chocolate Milk

Counter-question: Why didn't you ask your roommate?

For asking this question without just asking your roommate I submit that your house should be burned to the ground and the earth where its ashes lay should be salted so nothing grows there for a thousand years.

The Red Team
Question #36817 posted on 06/11/2007 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
My friends and I were discussing today how there are lots of cool names to refer to groupings of animals-- a gaggle of geese, a swarm of butterflies, a gang of buffalo. What is your favorite? Or what is the most unique, in your opinion?

- Wisteria

A: Dear Lane,

I've always liked "a murder of crows", but you can find some other good ones here.

-=Optimus Prime=-
A: Dear Wisteria,

These are my favorites.

-Whistler
A: Dear Wisteria

Scurry of squirrels (it's just fun to say), gaggle of geese (also fun, and also an alliteration), and legion of superheroes.

-Humble Master
A: Dear Wisteria,

See also Board Question #17015 and Board Question #23545.

- the librarian
A: Dear Wisteria,

See also Board Question #17015 and Board Question #23545.

- the librarian
Question #36814 posted on 06/11/2007 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite verses in the scriptures?

- Helaman 5:46-47

A: Dear Helaman

Alma 55:32 (go read it, it's funny but has gospel applications).

-Humble Master
A: Dear Hel,

Doctrine and Covenants 123:17. Love it, love it.

From the Bible, I also love Romans 8:18.

Nike
A: Dear Helaman,

D&C 90:24. This one has helped me through a lot.

- steen
A: Dear Helaman,

See also Board Question #15869, Board Question #26538, and Board Question #31913.

- the librarian
Question #36813 posted on 06/11/2007 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is herbal green tea against the Word of Wisdom?

- Me

A: Dear You,

See Board Question #7631, Board Question #7749, Board Question #7779, Board Question #23817, Board Question #24388. (And just to clarify, tea is generally referred to as "herbal" when it doesn't contain leaves from the tea tree, so "herbal green tea" is a bit of an oxymoron.)

- the librarian
Question #36756 posted on 06/11/2007 midnight
Q:

Dear Latro,
Is your name short for Latrociny?
- Large Talons

A: Dear Large Talons,

Latro actually hasn't been with us for over a year now, but see Board Question #3466 for his explanation of the origin of his name. And sorry, it's not short for Latrociny.

Smile!

-Yellow
A: Dear Chicken,

While ::: Latro's ::: name is not short for "latrociny," the two words do have the same Latin root.

- Katya
A: Dear Large Talons,

I'm pretty sure it's short for Devastatingly Attractive.

-Tangerine
A: Dear Napoleon,

No, but Latrociny is a derivate of the root, which is my name. I got "Latro" from a teacher, actually (you can guess which subject). It comes from my actual last name and denotes a proud and noble history, despite the negative connotation (think "brigand" not "robber").

Nice to be remembered, thanks.

::: Latro :::