"God blesses those who take out his sweet spirits." - Just Another Cassio
Question #45406 posted on 05/30/2008 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

You probably got many responses to Board Question #45241, but here's another, just in case. Now, keep in mind, "I'm a lawyer, but not your lawyer," and also--I don't practice intellectual property law, but I took a few intellectual property classes in law school.

Here's the deal, owners of copyrights often state what they wish their rights were on their copyrighted material. So they'll write, for example, "This material may not be reproduced for any reason except with permission from the owner." But that isn't true. That statement totally discounts the first sale doctrine as if it doesn't exist. That's lesson #1: copyright owners write on their products what they wish their rights were, they do not write on their products what your rights are.

You don't care about fair use, though--I was just using that as an example. You're wondering whether the first sale doctrine applies to your review book, because the copyright owner seems to imply that it does not.

Basically, Laser Jock is pretty much correct, but I'll clarify his answer a bit. You didn't buy a license to use your review book; you just purchased a book from a bookstore. It would be a license if the copyright owner still maintains ultimate control over that book, which he doesn't (this is more debatable with software, but that's a completely different story. The law is clear with regard to books--you own that book, you don't merely hold a license to it). You bought the physical book--you can do whatever you want with that book. You can't, however, do anything you want with photocopies of that book.

But you aren't asking if you can photocopy the book and give a copy to your friend. You obviously know that is illegal--your friend can go buy his own book. The problem is that you would have then made it so you and your friend can both use the book at the same time without the inconvenience of having to be in the same room at that time.

You're just asking if you can give the book to a friend when you're done with it, which is completely different from photocopying it. Sure you can give it to your friend. Heck, you can even sell it to that friend. Or you can sell it on eBay. Or you can rip it apart and sell it one page at a time. It doesn't matter--you own that book and you can do anything you darn well please with it.

In short, this copyright owner appears to have followed the trend of overstating his rights as a copyright owner.

Signed,
Not your lawyer

Question #45402 posted on 05/30/2008 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Comment regarding Board Question #45330. Most tunes and lyrics in our modern hymn book have different origins. The details of each hymn can be found in "Our Latter Day Hymns: The Stories and the Messages," by Karen Lynn Davidson.

Interesting factoid: "The Spirit of God" (hymn #2) has been sung at every temple dedication since Kirtland, but the composer of today's music for the hymn was born after the Kirtland temple was dedicated. What was the original music? We know it today as the tune of "Now Let Us Rejoice" (hymn #3).

- Questioning

Question #45342 posted on 05/30/2008 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where does the phrase "Little is much when God is in it" originate? And by that I mean... Is it's first usage documented/known?

~ Kismet Keeper

A: Dear KK,

The earliest source I can find is a hymn by the same name, written in 1924 by Kittie L. Suffield.

- Katya
Question #45340 posted on 05/30/2008 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do we put salt in the water of things that boil? You know, noodles and oatmeal...that sort of stuff.

-Salty

A: Salty,

My first reaction was to mention the lowering of the boiling point, but I rather think the answer lays in another direction. Have you ever forgotten to add the salt to the water of your oatmeal? How did it turn out? Salt is a flavor enhancer and in many things that are boiled the product being boiled absorbs a fair amount of water in the process. You may have noticed that adding a teaspoon of salt to your rolled oats before boiling them is quite different than adding a teaspoon after they are cooked. Adding salt after cooking leaves the salt on the outside, so you really only taste it, making things 'salty' (think corn on the cob) instead of enhancing the flavor that is already there.

TINMAN
A: Dear Salty

This site, as well as providing several other intriguing facts about water, dispels the notion TINMAN mentioned about altering the boiling point:
Adding salt to water raises its boiling point:
Chemically speaking, this is a verifiable fact. Salt does raise wateŕ’s boiling point (and lower its freezing point—which is why home ice cream makers use rock salt). But the real question is whether this makes it take longer to get to the boiling point (and, for that matter, how far above 212°F/100°C it will get). Despite what you read in cookbooks, scientists claim that the amount of salt yoú’d typically add to a pot of boiling water is too small to make any meaningful difference in the boiling time or boiling point.

So I'd lean more towards TINMAN's flavor enhancement theory.

-Humble Master
Question #45338 posted on 05/30/2008 3:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've heard there is a gym available to students at BYU, a co-ed one in the Smith Fieldhouse, and both a men's and women's gyms in the RB, but I don't know what is required to be able to use them. Do you just need your student ID? Do you have to use the BYU t-shirt they provide and does that cost anything? Are the hours restricted?

I also want to know if my wife is able to use them. I am the BYU student, and although she has a BYU ID, she is not a BYU student. Can she also use the gyms?

Thanks for the help!

Getting Chubby

A: Dear Getting Chubby,

Board Question #13468 gives you a thorough walkthrough of how to use the weightlifting facilites, but I'll answer each of your questions, briefly.

Do you just need your student ID?

You need your student ID and BYU issued gym clothes (or at least a BYU T-shirt).

Do you have to use the BYU t-shirt they provide and does that cost anything?

Yes, you do and no, it doesn't. (There's a replacement fee if you lose the shirt, but no fee otherwise. See the question linked above for more detail on how to rent BYU issue and how to rent a locker.)

Are the hours restricted?

The Smith Fieldhouse weight rooms (there are two) are open from 6 am - 10 pm, M-S, except for when a weight lifting class is in session (and during devotionals, of course). You can find the current schedule online here (click Activities > Freeplay > Freeplay Schedule > Weight room) or pick up a printed schedule at 112 RB.

I also want to know if my wife is able to use them. I am the BYU student, and although she has a BYU ID, she is not a BYU student. Can she also use the gyms?

If she is an alumna, a part time student, or a Fall/Winter student who's not enrolled Sp/Su, she can pay a fee to use the freeplay facilities for the entire term. Otherwise, she can go with you and pay a guest fee of $5 / session (according to Board Question #32054). If you need more information, go to 112 RB or call 422-3980.

- Katya