Youth is a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on children. - George Bernard Shaw
Question #91560 posted on 08/11/2018 4:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

It's been a LONG time since I lived in Helaman. My little brother is moving in for fall soon and I'm helping get all his stuff together. What is something you wish you brought with you?

-Big Sis

A:

Dear Sissy,

I never lived in Helaman, but this question made me think of a story one of my friends who did live there shared. Since Helaman doesn't have any cooking things, he would make grilled cheese sandwiches by wrapping the bread and cheese in tinfoil, and then ironing it. 

So, I guess you could tell your brother to bring an iron and ironing board.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Big Sis,

When I lived in Helaman, I also had the fancy meal plan that allowed you unlimited visits to the Cannon Center 7 days a week, plus it included $250 a semester to spend on food outside the Cannon. I hadn't brought any dishes or cooking supplies with me when I moved in, but I ended up purchasing basics like plastic cups and bowls because I needed them for food I would pick up and keep in the fridge, especially for days like Sundays where the Cannon Center had limited hours.

But overall the space in a typical Helaman dorm room is very small, so try not to overdo it. There's limited floor space so I definitely wouldn't bring any extra furniture (for instance, I had a bean bag chair that we hardly ever used but that took up a lot of space). Plan ahead and only bring items that can fit in the closet and under the bed. As a freshman and since you won't need to cook for yourself, you really don't need too much, and moving gets exponentially worse the more stuff you have.

Love,

Luciana

Question #91556 posted on 08/11/2018 1:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Which is greater in magnitude, the infinitesimal possibility of life spontaneously being created, or the infinite possibility of growth in the universe?


-M N H

A:

Dear My Name Here,

Scientists are pretty sure not only is the universe expanding, but that it is expanding at an accelerating rate. So growth is guaranteed, which makes it of a greater magnitude than the infinitesimally small possibility of life spontaneously being created.

Peace,

Tipperary

Question #91544 posted on 08/11/2018 1:23 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are you familiar with ALEC? What are your thoughts and feelings on this "Council" between private sector 'representatives' and state legislators? Are they controlling our life by letting the Rich and Powerful write the bills to benefit themselves (as Ava DuVernay suggests implicitly in her documentary 13th), or are they just helping out by forming a massive think-tank of successful business people?

Additionally, could you find why major names like Google, Amazon, HP, etc. have cut ties with ALEC in recent years?

-Guesthouse

A:

Dear Guesthouse,

For those not familiar with ALEC, it is an organization where state legislators and representative from large corporations get together to discuss ideas for legislation and write model bills. ALEC has been around since 1973 and about 200 bills based off ALEC models become law every year (Thanks Wikipedia).

There are two trains of thought. The first is that ALEC allows successful and informed members of society to help lawmakers create legislation that makes sense. It also allows state legislators from different areas the chance to talk with each other and compare notes about their different states. To me, in principle, I like the idea that our legislators are talking people from different areas of expertise to help write good laws.

The other train of thought, is that this allows powerful corporations to control the government and gain influence and power. While corporate representatives meeting with lawmakers isn't illegal, it still is a little disconcerting. There's a difference between a citizen writing a letter to congressman or calling his senator's office, and the owner of a large corporation with conflicts of interest helping write the laws that directly affect the success of their business. Personally, I don't think that the "Rich and Powerful" are taking over the government or conspiring to control our lives, but I am concerned that many states pass laws that are word for word the same. I think that if they were just talking about principles that it would be fine, but I think that the corporations actually writing the laws crosses a line.

The major reason why big companies have cut ties with ALEC in recent years has been due to protests. Some ALEC laws that have drawn fire in recent year have been "stand your ground" laws, tougher voter ID laws, and laws that described environmental protesters as terrorists. (This article describes some of the protests). Potential backlash from customers is what has driven most of these corporations away from ALEC. Anyways, hope this helps!

Peace,

Tipperary