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Question #91427 posted on 06/12/2018 7:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So our spirits look like our bodies right? But our bodies look like what they’re genetically programmed to look like. Do any of you guys see a problem with that. It just seems fatalistic because did God know who we’d eventually have kids with and pre determine what our spirits would look like but then how does that factor in our ability to choose a spouse. Does every spirit look like it’s body? Do spirits change their look inside a certain body? Do our spirits use certain genetic material that’s available to make a body that looks like their spirit body? Spirits looking like our bodies kinda infers there’s only a select (very limited) amount of partners we could have. How do you all reconcile these theological problems?

-biowonder

A:

Dear biowonder,

My first thought was that of Flatland, a great book which everyone should read. It focused on a 2D "person" (technically a shape) who was visited by a 3D person who tried to explain what a 3D world was like. (As you can imagine, the 2D person was very confused and thought the 3D person was crazy for a time.) Imagine if a 4D being tried to visit us and explain what a 4D world was like, or what 4D people looked like? I don't think we can fully comprehend what we did/will look like as a spirit, because I think we existed on a different plane/dimension. I highly suggest reading Flatland, because it might give you a better sense of what things might have been/be like!

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Wonder,

Do our spirits look like our bodies? Do our spirits look like anything? I mean, having an appearance seems to fall squarely in the physical realm, and doesn't seem to really make sense when talking about incorporeal things, such as spirits. And can spirits even see in the way that we mean it? I don't really think so. 

We experience things now through physical senses, and I don't believe we could have had exact copies of those senses without bodies. I do think we were still able to sense things as spirits, but I think the way we sensed things must have been radically different from the way we sense things now. Thus it is very possible that looking like anything doesn't make any sense when applied to spirits.

~Anathema

A:

Dear biowonder,

I don't think we have enough information about spirits and bodies to adequately answer your question completely. However, I wonder if you are taking the thought that spirits look like bodies too literally. Perhaps this is meant to be that spirits are in a similar form that our bodies have (arms, legs, head, etc.). So I don't know if my spirit looks exactly like my physical body, but I do believe that in the Spirit World I will still have arms and legs.

-Sunday Night Banter

Question #91426 posted on 06/12/2018 7:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the best advice you've ever heard?

-Rill

A:

Dear person,

Grad School Advice

It's hard to imagine non-grad school advice because I feel like my life began when I started grad school and will end when I leave. It's a life within a life. Sorry I talk about it so much. Anyways, what came to mind immediately was the best grad school advice I ever heard: "You will disappoint someone every week. Just make sure it's not the same person." It's been really helpful. I'm a bit of a people pleaser and I put a lot of pressure on myself and this advice has helped me to achieve much more balance than I would have otherwise. Some due dates are less of a big deal than others. Some things are a bigger deal than others. Things work out in the end.

Real Life Advice

I sat a while trying to think of something and realized I remember mostly a lot of bad advice that I have come to passionately disagree with. It means almost as much to me as good advice. The main one that comes to mind is this: "Hope for the best but expect the worst." My mother used to say this a lot and I hated it at the time. Now I flat-out disagree with her. I don't want to go through my life with low expectations, thanks. It definitely dampens the mood.

Other not great advice I feel I was given involved people pushing me to forgive other people ASAP for my own good before I was ready. It mostly made me feel bad about myself and like my feelings were stupid. It also made me angrier than I was before. And I was afraid I was in the wrong for reacting the way I did. Then I was also afraid of my feelings. What a mess. Anyway, now that I have had a good amount of time since the heyday of that, I have a bit more perspective. I trust my own feelings more now and am comfortable taking as much time as I need to be with my feelings. They aren't bottomless pits that I will fall into and never return from so it's all cool.

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Rilly Real,

I don't know about the best advice ever, but my parents always encouraged us to try new foods. When we traveled we always ordered things we never tried before and it was a lot of fun. I think it helped us to be open to new experiences. At the very least it introduced me to some really awesome foods. 

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Rill,

Mistakes can be your greatest learning opportunities. Thankfully I keep making about a hundred of them each day so that advice isn't easily forgotten.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear manioc,

Silly:The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Serious: If you neglect your friendships too often or for too long, eventually your friends will move on.

That second one was from some 65 year-old German and his 73 year-old wife who have somehow been traveling for the better part of 19 years. I met them in Paraguay last year and I have been trying to think about what actually makes me happy. Maybe travel is a part of it (and travel is over-romanticized, but that's another topic), but it's really, really nice to have people who you know and appreciate and who know and appreciate you in return. Life is weird, frustrating, fun, and challenging, so it's nice to face it alongside someone else.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz, having an unsatisfying time just barely inside the Angolan exclave of Cabinda 

A:

Dear Rilly-Roo,

It's too hard to sort through all the great life advice I've heard through the years to find the absolute best piece. So instead I'm going to share the best fashion advice I've ever gotten: wear what makes you feel beautiful.

~Anathema

Question #91345 posted on 06/12/2018 2:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it true that in Ghana if you want a divorce, your have to dress like you did on your wedding day? What purpose does this serve?

-Misfired Cannonball

A:

Dear Mis,

I asked one of my Ghanaian friends about this, and they said that it isn't true. Sorry!

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave

Question #91418 posted on 06/12/2018 12:01 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Casual doctrinal question for you based on Alma 34:33, "I beseech of you that ye do not procrastinate the day of your repentance until the end; for after this day of life, which is given us to prepare for eternity, behold, if we do not improve our time while in this life, then cometh the night of darkness wherein there can be no labor performed."

So to me it sounds like he's saying that if we don't take care of our salvation in this mortal life, we're essentially screwed for eternity. BUT we believe that people are totally still able to repent and accept vicarious saving ordinances after death, though. Does this contradict the quoted scripture?

One possible interpretation could be that by "then cometh the night of darkness wherein there can be no labor performed," he might be referring to the sort of temporary spirit-prison Hell those who haven't repented will have to endure until they fully repent? Maybe?

Let me know your thoughts,
Dave

A:

Dear you,

First off, great question! According to the Gospel Principles manual: 

In the spirit prison are the spirits of those who have not yet received the gospel of Jesus Christ. These spirits have agency and may be enticed by both good and evil. If they accept the gospel and the ordinances performed for them in the temples, they may leave the spirit prison and dwell in paradise.

Also in the spirit prison are those who rejected the gospel after it was preached to them either on earth or in the spirit prison. These spirits suffer in a condition known as hell. They have removed themselves from the mercy of Jesus Christ, who said, “Behold, I, God, have suffered these things for all, that they might not suffer if they would repent; but if they would not repent they must suffer even as I; which suffering caused myself, even God, the greatest of all, to tremble because of pain, and to bleed at every pore, and to suffer both body and spirit” (D&C 19:16–18). After suffering for their sins, they will be allowed, through the Atonement of Jesus Christ, to inherit the lowest degree of glory, which is the telestial kingdom.

I would also consider this resource as well.

To answer your question, I don't think there is a contradiction between our doctrine and the scripture you referenced. It is important to go back to the scriptures and figure out the context of Alma 34:33. Amulek is teaching in this chapter, but who is he speaking to? If you go back to Alma 32, we recognize that Alma and Amulek are teaching "the poor whose afflictions had humbled them" (quote taken from the chapter heading). This means Amulek's words in Alma 34:33 are directed to faithful members of Christ's church. Taken in this context, I believe Amulek is saying that people who belong to Christ's church and know the truth need to repent in mortality, and if they don't they won't have an opportunity to do that in the Spirit World. However, I don't think Amulek is saying the same thing for people who have not accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ. In fact, he's not talking to those people in this chapter and so I feel pretty confident in my conclusion.

Like referenced in the Gospel Principles manual, "In the spirit prison are the spirits of those who have not yet received the gospel of Jesus Christ. These spirits have agency and may be enticed by both good and evil. If they accept the gospel and the ordinances performed for them in the temples, they may leave the spirit prison and dwell in paradise." (emphasis added).

Anyways, that is how I read Alma 34:33. It seems consistent with the context of the scripture and is also consistent with LDS theology. I hope my answer is clear. If you have additional questions, I would be happy to see an email from you or another question!

-Sunday Night Banter

P.S. Please keep asking these types of questions while you read the scriptures. I think you will find that your scripture study will become more fruitful as you search for answers to your gospel questions.