"I'm a FELON?! Good to know." -Katya
Question #91236 posted on 05/15/2018 9:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is your movie library full of hard copies or have you gone digital? If you're digital, what platform do you use? Apple TV? Amazon? Pros? Cons? Regrets? Suggestions?

My wife and I started our own family library/collection of DVDs and Blu-Rays when we were married, but I'm considering starting to buy digital formats from now on to save space.

-Jack Hughman

A:

Dear Jugo,

I passed off your question to my sister, who has considerable experience with this. Here's what she had to say:

We have ridiculously huge libraries of both hard copies and digital movies, so I feel qualified to answer this. We use movies anywhere for our digital movies, which combines purchases from iTunes, Amazon video, Vudu, and I believe also a few others. 

Pros of movies anywhere vs any other platform: if a movie is available on one platform for cheaper, you can buy it there. Cons: I believe they're in a dispute with some studio because there are a few movies that we still have to go to the individual platform we bought them on to watch.

Pros of digital movies in general: more and more places don't have dvd or Blu-ray players (hotels, new laptops, etc.). We can watch our movies on our devices that don't have CD drives (iPads, phones,the cheap-o tablet we bought for [our three-year-old] to watch movies on during road trips). No fiddling around with finding, putting on, and putting away physical movies. No dealing with fingerprints (big bonus for families with small children).

Cons of digital movies: if your internet goes out, you can't watch unless you planned ahead. Downloading movies to watch offline can easily eat up memory on devices. Not every movie is available digitally for as cheap as physical copies.

We still buy physical movies if they're the cheapest option, but we honestly end up watching our digital movies a lot more often, and I love that they don't have to be physically stored somewhere.

So, there you have it! Good luck with your movie-making decisions.

~Anathema

Question #91252 posted on 05/15/2018 6:22 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What was your wedding day like. What is one thing you would change looking back?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear You,

I talked about my wedding day in Board Question #90076 (and I believe most of the married writers have written about their weddings, as well, so if you do some searching you should be able to find all their answers). 

One thing I would change is getting pictures with the whole temple behind us! Somehow it slipped our photographer's mind, and I didn't think to ask for it because I had other things on my mind, but we didn't get any pictures with the entire temple in the background, which makes me regretful every time I think about it. 

-Alta

A:

Dear Marriage-Needing Human,

As of writing time, my wedding day was ten days ago. Even now, it kind of feels like a blur. I got up, met Vienna at the temple, smiled as we listened to our sealer talk about how he and his wife served in Florida (Vienna and I did as well, if you didn't know already), MARRIED THE HECK OUT OF THAT BEAUTIFUL GIRL, took lots of pictures, ate some lunch, escaped with Vienna to a park where there were no noisy family members, drove to Vienna's house, sat wearily on an armchair, drove to the reception, greeted approximately one million people (including our very own Spectre, Tally M, and Ardilla Feroz), asked Vienna's aunt how the whole cake-cutting-and-eating business went, danced with Vienna, changed into sneaky clothes, left the reception, went and got some free comics (HECK YEAH WE STILL TOOK ADVANTAGE OF FREE COMIC BOOK DAY), went to the hotel, then collapsed, basically.

I don't really have any regrets; mostly I just wish I could have slept more in the two days previous but, hey, that's just kind of how things shake down sometimes.

-Frère Rubik

Question #91247 posted on 05/15/2018 6:21 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there anyway to automatically convert a Synthesia file to sheet music?

Thanks,
musician

A:

Dear Angel of Music,

Well, it looks like none of us on the Board (or the random group of technologically inclined people around me I asked just now) know how to do this, but it does appear as though Google has an answer! Here's a handy looking step by step solution for getting sheet music out of Synthesia for you.

~Anathema

Question #91233 posted on 05/15/2018 1:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I really want the sheet music to learn to play these songs, but as far as I can tell there's nowhere for me to buy it. Is my searching sub-par and there's actually a way to purchase or download the sheet music?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LEmer7wwHI&index=59&list=PLrTJ4_OqTjpqXyj1jesduqOGny6D19KmK&t=2001s

Thanks!

pianist

A:

Dear pianist, 

I LOVE STUDIO GHIBLI. While you can buy certain piano arrangements from these movies (like on Amazon), I'm not sure about this arrangement. However, this might be it. (I'm too lazy to print it out and find a piano and compare it to the youtube video, so have fun!)

-guppy of doom

Question #91237 posted on 05/15/2018 12:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've heard that the Womens' showers at BYU are stalls, rather than communal like the Mens'.

If this is true, why? Are women more self conscious about nudity, even around other women? Do building designers care less about the privacy of men? Is this somehow discrimination in some way? Because it sure feels like it.

-Humongous Wot

A:

Humongous, 

A very similar question has been talked about before so you might like to read up on BQ #72803. Other writers have confirmed that the men's showers do not have stalls. I wonder if they're more worried about the risk of men seeing women, rather than same sex exposure. Most utility and maintenance workers are men. I would guess historically most coaches and staff would be men (hopefully that has improved. I haven't checked those statistics.) If a member of the opposite sex was going to accidentally see a student naked, it would probably happen in the women's locker rooms. Also I think culturally, LDS men tend to be particularly protective and respectful of women--sometimes overly so. I mean it's not the first amenity that LDS women are exclusively offered. We get cushy chairs in every church building. Ever think of that? But, as mentioned in 72803, I don't think the privacy was ever really about homosexuality. I don't know if women are more self-conscious. It's possible that it was kind of a market decision. If women are more self-conscious they may have noticed no one was using the showers. Or maybe a large enough group of women asked for them.

My point is, it could be a lot of things. The source of that decision is, in my view, too obscure and spread out to define by digging and deeper. I try to make the calls, send the emails, and do the sleuthing when I think there is a clear answer to be found. Unfortunately the speculation I've outlined already will have to suffice in this case. It could very well be rooted in sexism. It seems like it is. But whether that sexism is overt or just an abstracted product of our culture is hard to say. If you have any real problems with it, start calling and emailing the facilities director. I'm sure if you call around enough you can find out who could make that happen. Let them know it matters to you and it might happen!

I recently reached out about bicycle parking in my work building and it turned out they already made motions to improve it! Maybe they're already working on it. Good luck!

Babalugats

Question #91223 posted on 05/15/2018 8:10 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Due to some mental health stuff, I've spent my college years living at home and not away in an apartment, having the normal BYU social experience (yay depression). However, now as I approach my senior year (and my 25th birthday) I am doing much better and wanting to move into an apartment. I fear that I am too old now though, and that people will view me as the old, weird one that is trying to be young forever (the Provo bro stereotype comes to mind, even though I'm a girl but same thing). Do you think 24 (25 in July) is too old to move out for the social aspect? Will people think I'm trying to hold onto my youth by doing what you normally do at age 20-22? I feel like I'm that age so it sucks that I'm not. I don't feel ready to be 25 yet. Not ready for a serious relationship, not ready to settle down, not ready to graduate, not ready to have kids. I just feel like my mental health problems stunted my emotional growth and now I don't know how to proceed. Please tell me honestly, would I still be able to fit in at my age?

-Q

P.S. I know age-range varies depending on apartment so I'm looking at College Place, Liberty Square, Lanai, and The Village if that makes a difference.

A:

Dear Q,

I'll say that, in general, it seems like the big apartment complexes (such as Liberty Square, Campus Plaza, King Henry, etc.) do tend to draw in younger crowds. The people at the Village seem a little older, maybe, but they also seem...well...I don't know. Like they all have a ton of money and also like to just throw that money around.

Aside from my first year at Helaman Halls, I spent my entire college career living in small apartments and houses, and the ward I was in always had a very wide range of ages. I liked it quite a bit, and I looked up to the older guys a lot. So, generally, that's what I'd recommend for you.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Q,

College greatly distorts perception of age. So much is changing and there are so many opportunities for growth that the difference between 18 and 20 or 22 and 24 can feel astronomical. But in reality, that's barely a difference. 2 years doesn't mean anything in terms of socializing, and being 25 certainly does not exclude you from the college experience. You can enjoy yourself and make good friends in an apartment and in a ward regardless of a microscopic age difference.

Outside of BYU, my close friends range in age from 21-32. Some are closer to my age of 23, some are closer to 10 years older than me. But that doesn't bother me in the slightest; I can spend time with someone who's 29 then someone who's 22 and not feel any difference in the way I socialize with them.

Moving into an apartment and changing your lifestyle can be stressful, but it's going to be great. You're going to make tons of friends and have a good experience, regardless of your age.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Q,

I just wanted to chip in and say that I've had roommates who were in their mid to upper twenties and it never seemed weird to me. We were friends, and they made tons of friends in our ward, and nobody thought it was weird that they weren't younger. It probably helped that I was also in my twenties by that point, so they weren't too much older than me, but if you follow all the other writers' advice and find somewhere with an older crowd, I don't think it would be a problem. 

-Alta

Question #91220 posted on 05/15/2018 8:09 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm trying to plan a wedding, and since my fiancé and my families are not remotely close together, we're doing two "receptions". We're also trying to do very low key celebratory events in each location, because we don't want a huge to-do and also we're pretty broke and paying for it ourselves.

The problem is, the terminology for what these celebratory events should be called is apparently a huge sticking point with my mother. The event in the south will take place in a family member's barn decorated with old barrels and flowers and lights, feature a "make your own taco" bar or similar, and have (giant?) board games as an activity instead of dancing and a large program. It will happen before the proper wedding because that's what works, and we want people to feel free to come, have fun, talk, and then go on their own schedule. It's also happening far away from where the sealing itself will take place, so we expect it to be the main part of the celebration in that part of the world.

My mom is insisting that we cannot call it a reception, and that if we don't call it a "family barbecue" guests will be confused and upset - something about the lack of formality, timing, and etc? She has kicked up quite a fuss about it, too. It makes no sense to me. It seems basically equivalent to a cultural Hall wedding with Costco finger foods, and dancing replaced with games. Also, it isn't just for family, so why call it a family barbecue? Isn't that more confusing? Someone else said we might call it an open house, but I have no idea what makes an open house different from a reception, either, and it seems like an exclusively Mormon term to use for a wedding anyway, and I can find no references on what it actually means. As far as the "family barbecue" idea goes, I have literally never heard of such a thing outside of a "family dinner" context, which is a thing we're doing, but not there and not then.

So what on Earth makes a reception a reception? What would you expect from one? How is it different from an open house or a family barbecue, and when do you use which term?

-Mother Henpecked

A:

Dear Henpecked,

I believe (and Vienna confirms) that any reception-type activity that's not on the day of the wedding is typically referred to as an "open house."

Now, if I may quibble with myself, I once attended a friend's wedding reception that took place the day before she was married. By the above definition, this would qualify as an open house, but it feels more right to call it a reception because it was the primary reception-type event and it was closest to the wedding.

Anyway, I would call the event you described an open house; hopefully your mom is okay with that.

-Frère Rubik