"Barring polygamy, you will break up with every person you date minus one." - Yellow
Question #90758 posted on 02/12/2018 7:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Now that Net Neutrality is dead, what are the odds of Verizon (which owns Yahoo) customers finding themselves unable to get to Google or gmail, or Comcast (which owns NBC) customers unable to get to other TV content sources like the CBS streaming channel on Roku?

-person

A:

Dear Person,

According to this article, not too much. Well-established companies will probably do just fine, because they have big enough bank accounts to pay for high-speed service, and they're motivated to do so to keep their customer base happy. However, it could be very bad for any new companies trying to establish themselves, because they might have to pay internet providers to have their content loaded faster, and if they're just starting up they probably won't have that kind of money. And according to this article, the changes we're most likely to see as consumers of big companies' media will happen as those companies slowly roll out more fees.

I am so sorry for keeping this question overhours so long and for so little reason. Hopefully this answer is still helpful to you.

-Alta

Question #90745 posted on 02/12/2018 1:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What would you do with five months of free time and $5,000 to spend? If travel, what destinations?

- Fogo de Teto

A:

Dear Fogo de Teto,

Use Scott's Cheap Flights (I get their emails, and they just make me want to travel the world) to get cheap flights! Usually those tickets are $200-500 each, so I would fly to perhaps 5 random destinations around the world. (Why random, you ask? Well, there's no specific place I'd like to travel to, and spontaneous travel is the best, so I would have adventures in every corner of the globe!) I'd spend several weeks in each place living as a local instead of a tourist. Get to know the culture a bit, be involved in the community (I would also buy this so I could communicate with everyone), do some service, make friends, then fly home for a week to recover (being an introvert can be the worst sometimes) before flying to a new destination. 

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear traveler,

Do you have these five months and five grand? If so, I'd suggest you do the following:

1.Think of some places you haven't been to yet.

2. Figure out what time you can go to these places.

3. Check if the weather is good there. I've previously been too lazy to consider whether it was the rainy season or not in a country I was about to visit and it changed the trip dramatically. 

4. Buy a one-way plane ticket and then just sorta go, allowing yourself more flexibility.

Where would I go with this amount of time and money? Last year I did a combined total of 8 months in South America, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, (highlights being Bolivia, Paraguay, Albania, Kosovo, Turkey, and Iraq) which was fun, weird, interesting, and positively wallet-deadening. I've only recently made enough money killing weeds at a national park to finish covering my expenses from last year.

Overall, I spent $1000 per month, which ended up being enough to cover airfare and occasionally splurge on scuba diving and things like accidentally wrecking a rental car engine, as I lament in Board Question #89935. If you're more careful than me, your money could last you, like, quite a while.

I'm currently deciding whether or not I should join my brother on a journey to West-Central Africa (Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Republic of the Congo) or possibly to Central Asia, especially Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and the Wakhan Corridor area of Afghanistan. I don't really have five months this go-around, so I don't know if I'll actually do any of this or if I'll just do nothing instead ("nothing" here being a word which means working for sustenance moneys).

Another part of of me wants to move to a single foreign country next year for five months, but since I've been telling myself I'll do this for years, I sort of doubt I'll follow through with it.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz, who apologizes for holding this answer long past the point of usefulness

A:

Dear Botafogo,

Man I wish! I’m really torn between two options. I’d either choose:

  1. Become a hot air ballon pilot. I‘ve always dreamed of being a hot air balloon pilot, but it takes around $3500 and 3-4 months of training. $5000 And 5 months would be plenty to get me started. 
  2. Explore South America. I’ve always wanted to go to Brazil. I’d fly down to Brazil, spend 1-2 months exploring what Brazil has to offer and then see how far south I could get hitchhiking. With some luck I’d get to see Paraguay, Uruguay, and head all the way down through Argentina to see Patagonia. 

This sounds so awesome! If anyone just so happens to have $5000 to give me so I could do this you would be my favorite ever. Just saying. 

Tipperary

A:

Dear you,

I think I would probably be more limited by funds than by time, but I would go to Europe and see all the historical sites that I've spent years reading about but that I've never gotten to see. For someone who studied Western European history, my travel experience is sadly limited and I need to start fixing that.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear person,

Go to New York for a long weekend and spend all of it!

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Fuego,

Backpacking trip through Europe.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Fuego,

I would buy cheap flights and then use local transportation between relatively nearby destinations so I could go to A) France, Spain, Italy, and Germany, B) Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington DC (and might as well visit New York while I'm close), C) Chichen Itza and Cancun, and D) Machu Pichu and Patagonia. With seriously discounted plane tickets and Airbnb I might actually be able to afford all of that with the allotted $5000. If I had any left over, I would want to go to Croatia and Russia.

-Alta

A:

Dear Foto de Togo,

I would drive across the United States and visit every single Chick-fil-A location and buy a chicken sandwich at each one.

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave

A:

Dear Fogo de Teto,

I would probably go visit my mission companions in Australia, Tonga, and New Caledonia (maybe find me a cute Poly to marry if no one minds my sayin'). I don't think 5,000 would cover it but it would help a ton. If you're asking for suggestions, I would also seriously consider New Zealand.

Babalugats 

Question #90943 posted on 02/12/2018 1:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

As a follow-up to Question #90933, which temples do still have escalators? Is it only Seattle, or are there any others?

-Need to make new plans...

A:

Dear Planner,

The Provo, Ogden, Jordan River, and Seattle temples all had escalators in them originally. Those temples were built around the same time, and with similar floor plans. Seattle is the only one left of those four that still has escalators. I obviously haven't been to every temple in the world, but a quick Google search showed no evidence of any other temple having escalators. So it might just be Seattle at this point.

I tried searching the archives for "temple escalator", but the only thing that came up was Question #76607, which mentioned the escalator at the North Temple train station in SLC. So there's another option for your wedding if Seattle is too far away, I guess.

-Kirito

Question #90888 posted on 02/12/2018 1:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I lived in the FLSR as an undergrad, where cleaning checks were monthly nightmares. I remember thinking, though, that they sure kept the place clean--like, deep clean, not just on the surface. What all was included on that list of instructions for cleaning checks?? I really wish I still had it now that I'm in my own place.


--CK

A:

Dear Louis,

Tally M. used to live on-campus and she said that the FLSR has basically the same cleaning check list as on-campus housing. So, I present to you the list that you desire

It may not be the most current version but it'll do the job just fine.

-Spectre

Question #90866 posted on 02/12/2018 7:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

LGBT members of the church are told they have a place here, but then the church turns around and seems to do everything it can to destroy that place for them. It doesn't seem like anybody is honestly willing to consider what life is like for LGBT people, or what they go through. What will become of gay people in the church? Why would a God of love create gay children, and then make no place for them in the eternities?

- Dazed and Confused

A:

Dear Dazed and Confused,

You submitted this question on the same day that President Nelson was announced as the new prophet with President Oaks and President Eyring as his counselors. Though I did not have time to read the press releases or watch the announcement myself, by skimming though Liberal Mormon Twitter (LMT) I gathered that a lot of people took President Uchtdorf's exit from the First Presidency as a sign that President Nelson was pushing a more traditional, conservative agenda. I assumed your question was about that and put down a placeholder to respond to it, not knowing that President Nelson fielded a question specifically about LGBTQ members and the church in that press conference. Upon discovering that, my previous answer no longer seemed relevant, but I still felt I should say something.

Now, a few weeks later, I'm not so sure I actually have anything of any real worth to say, other than that this issue weighs on my mind quite a bit. For all that contemplation and pondering, though, I haven't become any less confused. 

...I'm sorry. I've drafted and re-drafted this response, but I just can't quite come up with anything that I deem useful to say. You've come to us for answers, but I'm afraid I just don't have any right now.

I do believe that God loves you, Dazed, and that there is room in the Church and in the eternities for you. I wish I knew more specifics, but I don't. These questions need to be asked, and we need people to ask them, because that's often the way we get revelation.

I'll be praying for you. I wish I could do more.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear D&C,

I really don't feel qualified to answer this question. But the Church does have a website, www.mormonandgay.lds.org, which is full of real stories about real people in this situation. Maybe it can help clarify what the Church is actually teaching right now.

I'm glad this conversation keeps getting brought up. The Church is teaching love, but if the members don't catch on it doesn't do a lot of good. I try to always welcome reminders to love others.

-Kirito

A:

Dear friend,

I really feel you on this one, it's a very hard question that I'm also not qualified to answer. And here's the thing, maybe even the Prophet of the church isn't even qualified to answer that question right now. I mean, our church functions on continuing revelation, and there have been significant instances in the history of the church where the leaders of the church were waiting for revelation on a certain topic. I would like to think that if the leaders of the church had a more clear picture of the future of the LGBT community and the church, we would know more about it.

In the meantime, I'm trying my best to understand and to be inclusive. I really do believe that there is a place for our LGBT brothers and sisters in the eternities and so does Elder Ballard. I think that there's a lot that we don't understand and we would do well to remember that. We'd also do well to love and include everyone a lot better than we do. And most of all to listen, because honestly as a church community, we're pretty bad at that. I'm sorry that's not a satisfying answer to your (and my) question, but I don't know if there is one at this point.

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave