By elimination, dishonesty is the second-best policy. -George Carlin
Question #90968 posted on 02/20/2018 10:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are all the reasons that BYU is like Hogwarts?

-Dobby

A:

Dear Dobby,

BYU and Hogwarts are the same because the staircases magically move. That's why you can never find your class in the MARB or JKB: gosh-darned magic staircases.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Dobby,

Are you telling me that I'm actually at a place called BYU as opposed to Hogwarts!?

~Seriously Disillusioned Anathema

A:

Dear Dobby,

  1. We have secret passageways, and you'll get in trouble if you get caught in them.
  2. You can get lost within its walls. (I mean, there's a reason every FHE group ever has played hide and seek in the HFAC.)
  3. People are constantly debating over which major/House is the best.
  4. We have a poltergeist (or at least another Weasley twin). 
  5. There's a lot of ways you can get expelled. (But not killed. But that wouldn't comfort Hermione.)
  6. DRAGONS!!!!!!
  7. We play Quidditch
  8. You can take Herbology (though under a different name). 
  9. We have advisors that help us know which classes to take to graduate and get the job we want.
  10. We hear the same songs
  11. Our buildings, like their paintings, can talk.
  12. We learn all about charms
  13. We require Defense Against the Dark Arts courses.
  14. We have a history of unbreakable vows.
  15. Our headmaster cares deeply about us. 
  16. We freaking love Harry Potter.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Dobby,

Sometimes the cell service is spotty.

-Kirito

Question #90950 posted on 02/20/2018 10:28 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

This website (http://thetruthaboutthewinchesterhouse.com/) says " Sarah Winchester was a Rosicrucian and a Freemason (yes, there are women Freemasons)."

Question One: Are there REALLY women Freemasons? I asked my sister who knows more about this kind of store more than I do, and she SCREAMED at me NO!

Question Two: Were any parts of the horrible, horrible movie, "Winchester", filmed on location at the actual Winchester house in San Jose?

-Wrinkled Rhubarb Shoelace

A:

Dear you,

From this article, it looks like they researched the house/what was in it and used some items from inside the house, but didn't actually film there.

Wait this disagrees: link.

I've toured that place, and it's a crazy house.

~Anne, Certainly 

A:

Dear WRS,

Just to answer the first question—yes there are!

So first, a bit of history. Freemasonry was created around the 16th century by stonemasons who wanted to ensure that stonemasons who moved into new cities could be trusted to have the proper skills (source). You could think of Freemasonry as a Facebook group open only to LuLaRose distributors who had a secret word (or, like the Freemasons, a secret handshake) in order to identify each other. As women became stonemasons, they became part of the Freemasons (source). However, while there were some women involved in Freemasonry before the 18th century, the first printed constitutions of the British organization banned women. This sentiment took hold in American lodges, which is why the idea of a female Freemason seems so foreign to us (source). However, there are different Masonic organizations that include women (see here) and some orders that only include women.

Initially I thought your sister was right, but it looks like we were wrong! I'm glad too—I've always secretly wanted to become a Mason. This is my chance!

-guppy of doom

Question #90861 posted on 02/20/2018 9:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I'm coming in as a freshman early returned missionary and have to decide between starting in Spring summer or Fall semesters? Thights, suggestions, advice. All is appreciated.

-Ye Olde Sr. Tapitio

A:

Dear Tapatio,

I got back from my mission in February (3 years ago, so this is not recent, haha), and I started in summer term. Personally I liked it because  campus was much less crowded, class sizes were smaller so I was able to get to know my teachers and my classmates better, and the course loads were smaller so it was much easier for me to adjust to college again. It was awesome. 

One thing that I did not like about starting in summer term was that my ward wasn't very social and it was really hard to get to know them all. Apparently that's different from most wards during the summer, but the ward I moved into was super clique-y, and I think it would have been easier to get to know everyone if I had moved in during fall with a big influx of new people. But again, apparently for most people, Provo is great and super social in spring/summer.

Sort of going along with that, one of the pros of returning in the fall is that a bunch of people will be in the exact same boat as you, and it's easy to make friends.

However, whatever you do, my advice is to just stay busy when you get home, be it with school or a job. For me, February was sort of a terrible time to return because NOTHING happens in February. I couldn't go back to school in the middle of the semester, and I didn't have a job set up right when I got home, so I had a few weeks where I was just job searching and felt so bored and purposeless. Eventually I got a full-time job, where I worked until I returned to BYU, and even though I did not love it, at least it gave me something to do with my time. Believe you me, it's pretty terrible to have nothing to do when you get back from a mission.

-Alta

A:

Dear olde,

Whichever you decide to do, I would strongly suggest making sure you have something (classes, job, etc.) to do when you get home. If you don't have a job lined up and don't think you'll want/be able to get one, definitely start school earlier. After having a set schedule and being busy 24/7 for 2 years/18 months, having free time at home can drive you a bit mad. Plus, you're already used to working hard, so jumping right into something productive (whether a job or classes) will let you carry on those habits and not let them die. 

And an unwarranted piece of advice—don't get married within six months of coming home (unless you knew the person before your mission). I've had a number of friends meet someone and marry them within a few months of getting back, all because they were so focused on completing their next mission of marriage. Don't do it. It can be hard to resist the temptation at BYU, especially among freshmen RMs, but waiting to actually know the person and deciding if you really want to spend eternity together is better than a hasty and unhappy marriage, as one of my friends is discovering.

Best of luck in whatever you do!

-guppy of doom

Question #90972 posted on 02/20/2018 5:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In cartoon shows, do cartoons exist? Or are all shows in cartoon shows live action?

-Love Ducks

A:

Dear Love Ducks,

Yes, cartoons exist within cartoons. In Phineas and Ferb they watch a lot of a cartoon called Pinhead Pierre, in addition to some other ones. In Board Question 83657, Frere and Tally give some other examples, as well.

-Alta

A:

Dear LD,

In Steven Universe, there's a really strange cartoon called Crying Breakfast Friends!

-Kirito

Question #90971 posted on 02/20/2018 1:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do most people wash their genitals and butt with the same shower poof, washcloth, etc. that they use for the rest of their body? Isn't that unsanitary?? Wouldn't it make more sense to have a separate washcloth and then wash your hands afterwards? Please explain people's way of thinking to me.

Thanks,
guitar

A:

Dear Guitar,

I don't know, do they??? The amount of time I spend thinking about how other people wash their genitals/butt is pretty much zero, so I really can't explain to you "people's thinking" when it comes to this. But you know what, so far, not knowing hasn't had any sort of negative effect on my life whatsoever. If it grosses you out, don't do it, but spending time and energy worrying about what other people may or may not do with regards to their own personal hygiene doesn't seem very productive to me. If you're really worried about it, just don't walk around touching other people's faces.

-Alta

posted on 02/20/2018 9:10 p.m.
I've phrased questions like this before when what I was really asking is "how do other people do X so I can make sure I'm not accidentally doing X wrong on myself." If that is actually what you meant, no fear. When I did a Google search on "shower hygiene" and similar search terms to what you were asking, it would seem that most people (i.e. the internet) are concerned with things like replacing your loofah/sponge every few weeks and washing your towels weekly.

The articles I found were either "how to shower properly" with no mention of genital cleaning, or "how to clean your genitals" with no mention of if you should be using the same cloth for the rest of your body.

The truth is, our hands and feet get way grosser just going about our daily lives and touching door knobs, computers, cash money, etc. When you take a shower with water and soap, your whole body is getting clean at the same time. Your genitals are not permanently dirty or necessarily grosser than the rest of your body. Do what you're comfortable with.

--a reader
Question #90926 posted on 02/20/2018 1:01 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why are togas and loincloths socially unacceptable attire? They're definitely more comfortable than pants.

-Greek Life

A:

Dear Greek,

The short answer is because this isn't Ancient Greece or Rome. The long answer has to do with changing social norms, underlying culture, prevailing attitudes about fashion and modesty, and availability of resources, but I'm not enough of a sociologist, psychologist, or economist to really give a full explanation of why all of those things changed. You may just have to content yourself with knowing that because we live in neither Ancient Greece nor Ancient Rome, the way we live our lives is quite different from the way they lived their lives in a lot of ways. And if that means we don't get the comfort of togas, at least it also means our society doesn't encourage slavery as the spoils of war, and I'm pretty okay with that.

-Alta

A:

Dear Greco,

Anciently togas were only to be worn by Roman citizens, and foreigners and slaves were forbidden from wearing them1. Are you a Roman citizen? If you aren't a land owning Roman citizen then not only is it it socially unacceptable, but illegal under ancient Roman law.

While togas are strictly off limits, there are still places that wear loincloths. I was hesitant to do too much Google searching for reasons that should be obvious, so I didn't find anywhere specific for you. Wikipedia did say that there are native tribes in the Amazon Rain forest that still wear loincloths. So if you really want to wear a loincloth all you have to do is find a place where it is socially acceptable. As you may have noticed, the USA is not one of those places.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear GL,

Togas and loincloths are only socially unacceptable because not enough people wear them. If they're as comfortable as you say they are, you should have no trouble finding a band of people to wear togas and loincloths, convert a celebrity to your cause, get a photo shoot, convince all of America that they should be wearing them as well, and make America the new Ancient Greece!

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Grecian,

Are you telling me this is why I get so many strange looks when I go out in public?

~Anathema, needing to seriously rethink her wardrobe

Question #90783 posted on 02/20/2018 1:01 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

On the TV show Futurama Nixon's head in a jar is the leader of the country (planet?) and he/it lives in the White House with the headless body of Spiro Agnew.

So in the episode in which we see that Fry has a second job as a security guard at the head museum, where all the US Presidents' heads sit, in any of the shots showing all the presidents, is Nixon there, or a conspicuous empty space where he should be?

-comicon panel nerds want to know

A:

Dear Comicon,

Nothing gets me going like an excuse to watch an episode of Futurama, so I was really excited when I saw this question. A quick google search showed me that the episode in question is called "All the President's Heads," and it's in season 6, episode 20 (Wikipedia says it's episode 23, but IMDB says it's episode 20, and I trust IMDB more for this). Unfortunately, Futurama is no longer on Netflix, Hulu only has up to episode 16 of season 6, and Amazon Prime makes you pay to watch Futurama. I wasn't even able to find it on Youtube. I kept waiting to see if it would come back on any of those sites, but alas, 'twas to no avail.

However, I wasn't about to give up that easily, not when Futurama is on the line. I can tell you that the Wikipedia page for that episode doesn't list Richard Nixon as one of the cultural references along with all the other presidents in the hall, and Billy West, the actor who voiced Nixon, did not voice Nixon in that episode. In light of that information, my guess is either that there's a conspicuous absence on the shelf where Nixon's head used to be, or that they just filled in that area with other heads. Sorry I couldn't give you a more definitive answer. I tried, I really did. 

One thing I did learn while researching this answer, though, is that Billy West voiced a ton of the characters on the show, including but not limited to: Fry, Professor Farnsworth, Zapp Brannigan, Dr. Zoidberg, and Richard Nixon. I just want to take a minute and point out that all those characters have very different voices, and I'm very impressed that Billy West did them all. What a guy!

-Alta

posted on 02/20/2018 9:09 p.m.
I re-watched the episode and didn't see Richard Nixon's head anywhere, so he must still be busy fulfilling his duties as President of Earth. There isn't a conspicuous empty space because the presidents aren't shelved in order.

The episode number is different on IMDb vs. Wikipedia because IMDb uses the air date for order and Wikipedia uses the production date.

--Futurama Fan