"Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity." - Darrell Royal
Question #92008 posted on 02/06/2019 6:46 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

LDS church leaders have presented to US presidents their family histories/genealogy. I know they have done this for Obama and possibly Clinton and Bush. Do you know if they will do it for Trump? Will the church MAGA? Thanks,

-Salty Dog

A:

Dear Bark Bark,

I can't say. When President Trump visited Salt Lake in 2017 the visit focused on giving the President a tour of Welfare Square. I think it depends on whether or not it would be of interest to Trump. It also depends on how many times church leaders meet with the President. Obama made one visit to Utah, but was also visited by church leaders in DC. George W. Bush visited Utah four times. Presenting genealogies to dignitaries has happened a lot lately and I know it's been done not just in the United States, but also in Argentina and other countries. So I think it's highly possible, but I wouldn't guarantee it.

To answer your question I certainly hope that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints contributes to the goodness of the United States. Obviously the church isn't going to be following the agenda of President Trump, and I personally think it's a little sad that the phrase "Make America Great Again" has become associated with some policies that I think will not make America great, but there are plenty of ways members of the church can help improve America. As disciples of Christ we should definitely be involved in our community and try to make things better for our fellow men and women.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear salty,

Will the church make American great again? Well, according to President Ezra Taft Benson, "I have faith that the Constitution will be saved as prophesied by Joseph Smith. It will be saved by the righteous citizens of this nation who love and cherish freedom. It will be saved by enlightened members of this Church—among others—men and women who understand and abide the principles of the Constitution." So, um, yeah, looks like the church will MAGA.

-guppy of doom

posted on 02/06/2019 9:03 p.m.
I don't have an actual answer to the question, but I worked for the Family History Library last year (where they present the genealogies to the president.) While I was there, they mentioned that they presented VP Pence's genealogy to him recently. So the likelihood of them doing it for President Trump is high.

-Seeker of Dead People
Question #91999 posted on 02/06/2019 4:52 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If someone offered to give a prayer in class, and that prayer was very long, could the professor step in? And if they did how would they?

-Emma W

A:

Dear Emma,

How long of a prayer could we possibly be talking about? Did someone give a 10 minute prayer in your class? Longer? Who would be so bold? 

General Conference prayers have long been considered the gold standard for length but I think the record for that is only like 4 minutes. I can't imagine the strength necessary to continue praying under the mental deathrays from fellow students and professor alike. 

To be sure, the professor could and should step in if the prayer goes over like 5 minutes. If the person praying is standing at the front of the class, I think a silent hand placed on the shoulder would be enough to shame any rational person into wrapping it up. Same goes for a loud throat clearing from the professor if the prayer is further away. However, the things that would stop a rational person may not stop anyone who would actually do this. That person is certainly not rational. If worst comes to worst, a loud "......and, Amen!" from the professor at a natural stopping point should do it.

-Quixotic Kid

P.S. For the record, I recently had an opportunity to test this out but I chickened out hard. What can I say? The class had only like twenty people in it and the professor already kind of doesn't like me. I just couldn't get up the courage. 

A:

Dear Emma,

I propose an experiment. You, one of your friends, or someone on the Board should do that. (Alas, I have graduated and cannot volunteer.) If you're nervous about doing it in your class, go to a random large class (the professors never know anyone there anyways) and when the professor asks for a volunteer for prayer, raise your hand. 

If I was a professor I'd probably start coughing or making some sort of noise. I'm extremely curious to find out what a professor would do in that case though!

(But seriously someone should do this and tell us what happens.)

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Emma,

I don't have an answer to your question and can't test it because I'm not at BYU anymore, but I did want to say that one time on my mission an old lady gave a prayer that lasted about 35 minutes. She kept forgetting that she was praying and would start rambling about her family, but then suddenly would remember she was praying again, and she just kept going. And going. And going. My companion and I started to snicker, because what do you even do in a situation like that, and she pointedly said, "And please forgive the sisters for laughing during my prayer." Eventually after about half an hour we tried to prompt her to end by saying leadingly, "In the name of Jesus Christ..." but she just glared at us when we did that. In fact, in retrospect I don't think she ever actually officially ended her prayer, we just took advantage of it the next time it seemed like she forgot she was praying and started a conversation from there.

-Alta

Question #91991 posted on 02/06/2019 4:52 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you pick a therapist in 2019? Starting from zero. This seems a really sensitive thing to do based merely on website blurbs from insurance, therapy practices, and the internet in general.

-Therapistless

A:

Dear Friend,

Now, before I get into this, I want to make it clear that all of the advice I'm going to give you comes from a person who has never had to choose their own therapist in their life. I've never done this. My therapist was assigned randomly to me through CAPS and it has just happened that my therapist and I work well together. I didn't do any of that on purpose, I'm just a recipient of some very good luck.

All that being said, I was able to find an article from the New York Times and one from The Cut. While they have slightly different ideas of what you should do when looking for a new therapist, there are a few main points I want to convey to you. The first is that you should be able to set up a free, over-the-phone consultation. It won't be very long, but you should be able to set up a time when you can talk to each other for a few minutes in order to get a feel for the therapist before you spend money on an actual appointment. This is beneficial for the both of you. You're trying to set up a partnership between the two of you in order to get you better. A good therapist will be evaluating whether their style of treatment would be the right track for you while you are evaluating whether this is a person who you trust to treat you.

Secondly, the first appointment should be a time for you to lay out your major concerns and discuss the treatment style that the therapist will use to help you. By the end, they should have a rough idea of what you're going through (if you've sufficiently opened up to them) and be able to give you a treatment timeline with actual goals for the two of you to work on together. 

Above all, the therapist should be trustworthy. They should set good boundaries and not tell you very much about their personal lives. For example, I can only think of about 5 personal details that I know about my therapist. I've been seeing them for almost two years. You and your therapist are not meant to be friends. While you should feel supported and comfortable telling them almost anything, they should not be doing the same thing. That signals an inappropriate relationship that you should get out of as soon as possible. You should not feel pressured or uncomfortable because of the things they say to you. They should ask before they offer you advice that may be hard to hear. They should not interrupt you, almost ever. 

I know that this answer has been very serious, but this is a pretty serious thing that you're getting ready to do. Therapy is important and finding a therapist is also super important. You can do this, and I'm very proud of you.

-Quixotic Kid, an anonymous internet stranger that is very proud of you

posted on 02/08/2019 11:57 a.m.
Can i, as someone who's been to over a dozen therapists add something.

dont be afraid to change them. Often. You may think that well if this one isn't working none will, but that's false. I've walked out of therapists offices and said, i'm never going back, and i've also stayed too long with some.

Just try a new one. there are many. and while they are not friends, it is a relationship, and sometimes it just doesn't work out. that's ok
posted on 02/08/2019 11:57 a.m.
Another thing that seriously helped me was talking to family/friends that know me well. If you know people who you trust who might have connections or knowledge of local therapists, they can be very helpful.
I have a family of cousins who have gone to various therapists in the area, and I was able to talk to my Aunt about suggestions that might be a good fit when I tried to find somebody.

-Not Jared Finch