"My brother is too kind. He was eminent when my eminence was only imminent." -Niles Crane
Question #92432 posted on 07/08/2019 11:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do any of you watch the Bachelorette? Any comments about this season?

-Talk about Trainwreck

A:

Dear Gab,

I'm pretty sure none of us watch either The Bachelorette or The Bachelor. However, just for the sake of this question, I did a quick google search on the bachelorette and read the first news story that popped up. Here are my comments:

"Yep, definitely never watching The Bachelorette. My feelings that these shows are terrible have just had some confirmation. And now I feel sullied for having read about it."

~Anathema

A:

Dear Train,

I've only seen one episode of the Bachelor and wow what a train wreck. While I don't follow that I highly recommend Bachelor of Provo Provo's Most Eligible. So cringy but sooooooo hilarious. I'm low key pretty stoked for Season Two.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Crash and Burn, 

The Bachelor / Bachelorette franchise is one of the most embarrassingly stupid things ever and I will die on this hill. I would rather eat live worms than watch a single minute of it. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

posted on 07/11/2019 2:15 p.m.
One of my peers enjoys watching the bachelorette with her 11 year old daughter for the purpose of illustrating what guys NOT to date and what mentalities NOT to have about dating and relationships.
I tuned out the details of the conversation, so I can't help you beyond that.
-C.S.
Question #92411 posted on 07/08/2019 11:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any really good dates recently? (Doesn't matter if it was with your spouse, significant other, etc.)

Any fun dates planned for the future? Mine is to go to multiple fast food places and rate their chicken nuggets from best to worst.

-Goldie Rose

A:

Dear Golden, 

I liked when Pebble and I go shooting out in the desert. I'm a pretty good shot and it's a nice way to focus and relax. 

We're also planning on going to the symphony in the fall, which I'm pretty excited for. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear G-Ro,

I just went on a date where we watched YouTube videos and ate whipped cream straight out of the can. I highly recommend it (you can substitute the whipped cream for your favorite snack if you’re allergic to whipped cream).

I also recommend trying out a new recipe together, or looking at random stuff at DI.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Rosie,

Some fun dates that my husband and I have done recently include making homemade pizza with friends and doing painting tutorials from Youtube. We're planning on going to some museums soon, and that's always a good time (Provo has so many weird museums! You have to see them!) 

Speaking of Provo, my favorite date there is going to Bruges on Center Street and ordering waffles and fries, and reading the Asterix comic books they have next to the door with my husband.

-Alta

A:

Dear Goldilocks,

Hasn't happened yet, but I'm looking forward to making sushi rolls for a date.

-me

Question #92435 posted on 07/08/2019 11:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How does working temporary jobs like Stadium of Fire/Freedom Festival work? Technically the temp workers don't get "hired", so it won't count as part of the 3 concurrent on-campus job limit, right? Thanks!!

-overworked & broke

A:

Dear Overworked, 

The 3 concurrent job limit only applies to on-campus jobs (TAs, Secretaries, BYU dining, Grounds Crew, etc.) As far as I can tell, working the Freedom Festival means that you are employed by the city, not by BYU, therefore it wouldn't count toward the limit anyway. 

If a reader has more experience in this regard, drop a correction. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

posted on 07/09/2019 1:23 p.m.
I only know about the Stadium of Fire security guard job since I did that 4 years ago. But that job is through BYU and you get to do 5ish hours of extra online training in case there's a shooter, etc.

I only had one job on campus and the only thing I had to make sure was that I wasn't going to go over hours on the weeks I had training (I had maybe two hours of on-site training the week of the event. Then a long day the day of the event.)

It was pretty sweet because they fed you dinner, got paid time and a half because it was a holiday, and once everyone was inside the stadium we could sometimes walk around the stadium and see what's going on. They encourage you to bring friends so it was fun hanging out with them too. Plus we were close to the fireworks and we got to watch them!

-Goldie Rose
Question #92426 posted on 07/08/2019 9:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

With the Democratic debates, the state of the world, and Arthur Brooks Commencement speech, I have been thinking a lot about listening to and empathizing with others.

Please listen to Invisibilia episode "The End of Empathy" (can be found on Spotify) and let me know what you think, in general. Some guiding questions:

What are your thoughts on empathy? Is it bad to empathize with people whose feelings are harmful to others? Or is it generally good to want to listen to all sides of an argument, even if some sides might be questionable?

Is the world a better place when we walk a mile in each other's shoes, or is it wise to be selective in who we give our empathy to? How far do we let ourselves go?

- Sticky Notes

A:

Dear Post-it,

This episode was really really thought-provoking and incredibly interesting. Listening to both interpretations catches you in a tough position. On one hand, Hanna's interpretation did make me feel almost sorry for Jack. But then, of course, you listen to Lina's interpretation, and it makes so much more sense. By the end, I was frustrated. I'm a very empathetic person. It's one of my favorite qualities about myself. But I'm also very socio-politically active, and I tend to be very angry towards people who do bigoted, racist, and misogynistic things.... like Jack and many other incels do. How could I find myself feeling sympathetic toward him? Does that make me any less a part of the fight against hatred? Or does it just make me a contributing factor? Am I a bad person for feeling bad for someone who does bad things? 

No. 

Empathy is a crucial part of humanity. I think the things that Hanna said about empathy being the solution to the world's problems may still be very true. And I also don't think that empathy is dying... I don't even think we need to be selective about who we give it to. But there is a difference between empathizing with someone, and agreeing with and/or supporting them. 

I think it is good to empathize with people, but not necessarily with their opinions. We should always be open to listen and consider someone else's point of view, and we should always respect them because they are a human being, and they deserve that. But you don't have to empathize to the point that you agree with them or their opinions. 

I do not feel guilty for empathizing with Jack, because I know how it feels to be rejected, and I can imagine how it would hurt to feel like you don't deserve love, or to have such low self-confidence. But I don't think that lashing out at women is the solution to that problem. 

That's the kind of empathy that I think helps solve the world's problems. If we refuse to see things as more than black and white, if we refuse to be kind to even our enemies, we'll never really get anywhere. When we see things only our way, and anyone else as an adversary, we create a lot of anger that tends to compound on itself. When people are willing to reach across the board and listen to the other side, that's when doors open to change hearts. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

Question #92436 posted on 07/08/2019 12:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a question that may not have an answer, but as most of the writers are still at the university there may be a resource there that may help answer this question.

I'm sure most people have heard of the famous "Doll Test", in which children of different ethnicities ascribe attributes to dolls of different skin color. These test seem to always be administered to children living in diverse areas, where various ethnicities live side by side.

My question then is this: has the "Doll Test" ever been administered to children from homogeneous cultures? That is, places with exclusively white or black populations? If so, what were the results? Did they differ? How did the children view other (or their own) races with minimal exposure beyond their homogeneous culture?

If such a study has been done, more information would be helpful. Thanks.

-DTv2

A:

Dear person,

I looked into the literature briefly and I can't find anything about the doll test being administered to children of racially/ethnically homogenous populations. I did find an article where the doll test was done in South Africa to see if children simply prefer dolls that resemble the majority (there are more black people than white people in South Africa). But it addresses quite a different question than the one you propose.

-Sheebs