"If you obey all the rules you miss all the fun." - Katharine Hepburn
Question #92277 posted on 06/07/2019 10 p.m.
Q:

Alright Board,

Since you all basically passed on question #91937 when originally asked, I thought I would tee it up again for Alumni Week. I know there are a lot of quantitatively-oriented people in the Alumni group, and I figure they might have fun with it.

----Original Question----

I regularly ride UTA FrontRunner from the North Temple Station to the Provo Station. I do this for lots of reasons, one of which is my perception that I'm reducing the carbon and particulate emission of the trip by taking FrontRunner versus driving. A few days ago, I was looking at the massive diesel fuel tanks on FrontRunner, and it made me wonder how many people have to ride the train in order for the fuel saved from not driving cars to offset the fuel burned by FrontRunner.

Question 1: how many vehicle miles must FrontRunner be taking off the road per FrontRunner mile in order for the train to "break even" in terms of carbon and particulates?

Question 2: Do we have any decent way to calculate, based on FrontRunner trips and ridership data, if FrontRunner, as a whole, is making things net better off in terms of carbon and particulates?

Assumptions: Assume that every vehicle mile is driven by a theoretical "average" vehicle. Assume that nobody is driving to or from train stations.

(I also understand that there are lots of other reasons to have a public transit program. I'm just talking about the pollution aspect here, and am not trying to label FrontRunner as "good" or "bad" on this basis).

-G

A:

Dear G,

So, answering your questions would require knowing several pieces of information namely:

  • The typical output of carbon dioxide and particulates by the engines on Front Runner.
  • How much the engines are being used.
  • The typical output of carbon dioxide and particulates by the average car driving in Utah.
  • How many rides FrontRunner is replacing (This isn't the same as number of riders, because you could have multiple people in a car, or people using the FrontRunner that wouldn't be using a car).
  • Additional adjustments such as fewer cars on the road leading to less idling and less pollution (thanks Zedability for pointing that out).

From there basically you multiple the average output per mile of the FrontRunner engines by the number of miles per day and compare that to the output of the cars that it would be replacing. As much fun as doing all these calculations by myself would be, it turns out that UTA already does similar calculations. The best public report I could find talked about the environmental impact of a "Free Rider Friday" event. The data they have isn't exactly what we need, but we can use it in a pinch to get data that will be useful to us.

According to this report the free fare friday increased ridership by 66.4% to 30016. This means that the average ridership is 18038, so the change in ridership is 11978 people. The report lists the amount of cars taken off the road and the environmental impact for the day, but the report also includes TRAX. The total number of cars taken off the road was approximately 17,560 and the total environmental impact was three tons of vehicle air pollutants and more than 200 tons of greenhouse gas prevented from entering atmosphere. If assume that the impact from FrontRunner versus TRAX is proportional to the amount of increased ridership. TRAX ridership increased by 32.2% to 79,825 which puts average ridership at 60,382 and gives an increase of 19,443 riders. The total percentage of ridership increase in total due to FrontRunner is 38.12% of the total change, which we multiply by the total impact to get the total of 6,694 cars removed from the road and 1.14 tons of particulates and 76.24 tons of greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere per day!

I'm sorry I couldn't answer your question exactly but I hope this answers the bigger question of the environmental impact of FrontRunner. It would appear that FrontRunner is making a positive impact environmentally and has even greater potential as usage goes up. If you'd like to look at the report you can get a better look at the numbers and analysis from the lovely engineers at UTA. Hope this helps!

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Jeepers, 

Hey man, I'm just here to prove that the current writers are still totally capable and awesome. I'm not particularly quantitatively inclined... which is why I didn't answer this the first time. But I'm not going to let this one slip past us. So for this answer, Tipperary and I put our heads together to tackle this question. 

First of all, we need to make an assumption: 1 vehicle mile = 1 passenger mile. Because cars can carry fewer people than Frontrunner can, it's easier to calculate things in terms of individual riders, assuming that each person that rides Frontrunner is one fewer person driving. 

Now for the facts: 

The average car emits 0.89 lbs of CO2 for every mile driven (see data found here.) Using the 1=1 assumption, that means Cars have a "per passenger mile" emission of 0.89 lbs. 

Frontrunner will emit X lbs of CO2, even if it's making its rounds with no passengers. The emissions per passenger goes down the more people that ride (logically. X/n will decrease as n increases.) To find where the point of equality is, we need to know how what n equals that would result in a 0.89 lb per passenger mile emission rate. 

Using data from the 2013 Sustainability Report, we charted the relationship between how many daily riders are on Frontrunner and the emissions per passenger mile reported for that year. Here's that chart: 

Emissions.jpg 

The points read from left to right, plotting 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, and the farthest point extrapolating the emissions for 2018. The red point represents the point of equality that we found, indicating how many riders would have to take Frontrunner daily to equal the same emissions per passenger mile as if they were driving. That number is 3775. 

In other words, as long as there are at least 3775 riders on Frontrunner daily, it "breaks even" in terms of carbon emissions. I couldn't find reliable information on particulates, so we're just going to decide it's the same number (even though it's probably more, since diesel emits more PM2.5 than petrol cars do. But, since there isn't specific numerical information about PM2.5 emissions of Frontrunner, I can't answer that for now.) 

So, is Frontrunner really better for the environment? Based on this data, yes. The most recent data shows that Frontrunner hosts 17,600 riders daily, more than quadrupling the necessary ridership to make up for the emissions. Plus, as technology advances, we think of even more ways to improve emissions, and based simply on the fact that Frontrunner can take more people than cars ever can, it will always be more efficient.

Hope this satisfies your query. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse and Tipperary

Question #92317 posted on 06/07/2019 7:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What should I do now that I'll be grateful for later?

-the future is unwritten

A:

Dear Natasha Bedingfield,

Sleep eight hours tonight.

Seriously, sleep deprivation does absolutely awful things to your mind and body, and getting enough sleep for weeks at a time feels amazing when you're used to always being exhausted. I can't recommend it highly enough.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Future,

Plan something with friends! It could be a one time thing, or a regular event like a board game night. Freshman year I didn't really have any friends, but Sophomore year I made some good friends and they have honestly been the most valuable thing to my academics, career, emotional health, and overall enjoyment of life.

Friends make such a big difference! Text or call someone right now! If you don't have anyone you're really close with than go socialize and meet new people.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear future,

If you have even $50 or $100 per month to put away, start up a retirement account and start paying into it. The earlier you start, the better off you'll be, and the less beholden to your work you'll be when you're 60 and nearing retirement. I'm a teacher and I don't personally believe that there will be enough money in my pension fund to actually pay me what they've promised when it's time for me to retire. So I've got my own private IRA that I pay into and it feels really good to have it there backing me up. This is a super boring thing to say, but if it doesn't feel important now, it will later on and you'll be glad you did it.

Best,

The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear my fifth grade jam,

I was going to tell you "don't place limits on who you are or think you could ever become", which I do think is great advice, but you asked for something that you should do, not something you shouldn't, so I'll add this:

Do something every day that uplifts you, and do something every day that lifts others up.

Love,

-the Goose Girl

A:

Dear Aziraphale,

Don’t walk six miles with a broken toe. Also, if you have anything you're procrastinating, do it now.

~Anathema

A:

Dear TARDIS,

Pay the extra few bucks for Hulu Plus. If you calculate the amount of time you'd be frustrated while viewing commercials, it definitely balances out.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear friend,

Learn to cook. Sure, you can live off of ramen and peanut butter sandwiches (and I've been there) but cooking good food can be cheap and really improve your overall health.

-Van Goff

A:

Dear person,

Do your laundry.

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Shulk,

Buy the best subwoofer you can afford. Don't cheap out and get a lesser one, you'll regret it.

-Kirito

A:

Dear Staring at the Blank Page Before You, Open Up the Dirty Window, LET THE SUN ILLUMINATE THE WORDS THAT YOU CANNOT FIND,

Go outside and take a walk. Wake up early one day and take a stroll around your neighborhood. Take time to notice things along your commute. Be present in the moment for a bit without dwelling on what has been and what may be. 

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Squash Lordling:

  • The geraniums, they call to you. Heed their call. Journal it. Throw the journal into the Great Salt Lake.
  • Match your 401(K). Paisleys are in, yo.
  • Contour.
  • Become a guerrilla artist in San Francisco, whose only art is living in a cardboard box under I-80. Take that, Diogenes. Box is warm. Box calls to you.
  • Create a new identity on LinkedIn. Your LinkedIn name is the name of your favorite Board Writer (me) + the last name of the person your dad was too chicken to take to prom in '89. I will endorse you for Public Speaking and Croissantery.
  • Reuse the jar of teeth your roommate has been collecting to start a podcast called Canines 'n' Molars with Bubs and Alyssa.
  • Hydrate.
  • The next time you run into Rick Perry, tell him that he should lay off the sauce. The nuclear arsenal is at stake!
  • Sleep 8 hours. Then sleep another 8. Another 8. Don't you feel refreshed? Cucumber slices. Ahhhhh.
  • When your first cousin once removed wants to connect with you on 23andMe, don't. You'll thank me later.
  • Buy the jumpsuit.
  • Don't buy the Apple stock. What kind of orchard has public stock, anyway? Weird. Eat the seeds.
  • Go lie on top of the grate outside the HFAC and let the sweet embrace of the bottomless void hold you like you were never held in that orphanage in Iași.
  • Take the LSAT. Don't go to law school.
  • Stretch.
  • Write your memoirs entirely by dictaphone. When the least-cute Jonas brother sues you, let him. After all, you're not a lawyer.
  • Uproot the geraniums. Those jerks are full of lies.

---Portia, regret-free

A:

Dear the ~

Put aside money now. Even in small quantities. You can do it. I promise.

~ Dragon Lady

Question #92300 posted on 06/07/2019 6:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

True or False: "Old Town Road (Remix)" by Lil Nas X featuring Billy Ray Cyrus is the best pop single of 2019 so far.

I know you beautiful geniuses won't disappoint me.

-Cognoscente

A:

Dear friend,

It is pretty good, but I like "SOS" by Avicii a little better (even if, as a posthumous single about overcoming drug addiction, it's a little sad).

-Van Goff

A:

Hello Kitty,

False because it's a country song.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

AHEM.

M.O.D.A.Q's response is the correct response and official stance of The 100-Hour Board.

--The Board Press Secretary

Question #92314 posted on 06/07/2019 4:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Worst Monday stories?

-Having a pretty sucky one

A:

Dear You Have All My Sympathy,

Well, there was the one where I found out that a person I had been working closely with for months on something important (and who I thought liked me) had written an email to other people we were working with talking about how everybody hates me and how much she hated working with me. 

Then later that same day I was driving to a job interview and there was a huge accident on the freeway, so I ended up getting to my job interview almost an hour and a half late.

-Alta

P.S. I found out later I got that job, though, so maybe even sucky Mondays are redeemable.

A:

Dear Totally Not Me Wanting to Rant About My Awful Day,

I broke my toe on a door frame last night, but since I don't have a car and Utah public transit is the worst, I still had to walk limp to and from work. It's three miles one way. And even just walking around my apartment to get ready for the day this morning was painful.

Then, once I finally made my laborious way to my job, I discovered that a certain necessary tool with the majority of my previous work stored on it had mysteriously broken. So most of my day was spent trying and failing to resolve that issue. Basically everything I attempted to do today was slow and not working properly.

Worst part of this story is, it'll all repeat tomorrow.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Fred,

I took the day off from teaching (field trip to the city pool? No thanks.) in favor of a routine doctor appointment where it was discovered I had a giant cyst on my ovary and not even two minutes later the cyst ruptured. I tell you what, even if you’ve given birth there is a good possibility that you do not know pain unless you’ve had a cyst rupture! That was three weeks ago. Today I went back to have another ultrasound on said cyst before undergoing surgery to remove the entire ovary. Fun fact, the cyst/tumor is now bigger than a football (it was about 10cm in diameter three weeks ago) and is starting to cause all sorts of other problems due largely to its vast size, so yep. Doctor doesn’t believe it to be cancerous, so there is at least that bright spot. I have this morbid excitement in regards to the pictures doctor promised to take, because I want to know what that beast looks like from the outside.

-Az

A:

Dear friend,

My work relocated to a new office over the weekend and increased my commute by a full forty-five minutes (which will go back down when I have a car but alas, I am one of those gays who cannot drive). It's Mondays like this where I really contemplate going back to freelancing. Oh, the good old days.

-Van Goff

A:

Dear Having

Just now (it's Monday while I'm typing this), I stood up to stretch and take a break from grading a stack of papers and in the process I rolled my ankle really badly. Not while taking a step or anything. Just standing up to stretch. And now I have my ankle up and wrapped with ice, and am procrastinating returning to that grading by answering this question.

-Humble Master

A:

Dear Michelle Phillips:

This story took place this past Monday.

Among the 6400+ (!) gentlemen who have swiped right on Tinder, and the 246 or so with whom I've done the same, I'd been chatting with a Google engineer who looked like a blonde Matt Meese and was younger than me and said he was "bad at flirting." That was truth in advertising! Figured I'd reject him before he could, unmatched, whatever.

Cut to: I go to a trivia night at the pizzeria across from the room I'm renting. It takes me a second to place him in the meatspace, but Google guy is definitely sitting there. We hit it off actually, and his family background is suspiciously close to my semi-abandoned but still fantastic YA novel, down to having an adoptive Japanese father. (He was going to take Japanese to be able to talk to his grandmother, but switched to German to accommodate a girl he had a crush on.) 

After a respectable third place finish for the group (as usual, I could be counted on to come through for Broadway and geography), he asked me if I wanted to get a drink and I was like, sure! Let's lean in to this awkwardness. 

Turns out that we both considered ourselves extroverts with crippling social anxiety. I was like, it wasn't you, I just assumed you hated me. Told him that BoJack Horseman Season 5 was necessary watching.

Then my life became a Bojack episode ... When Pickles says she's born in 1993 I was like, you're like '91 right and he was like ... '93. (!) That's the year my brother was born. I remember it well!

So, we're making out, but my anxiety kicks in, yadeya, and he's like so very younger Millennial and wants enthusiastic consent or whatever and I go into my spiel and then it COMES OUT:

HE
IS
"TECHNICALLY"
MARRIED

His wife wanted an open relationship with Eddie Redmayne there and he didn't ... but now he's springing it ON ME?!

I still gave him my number, which makes literally no sense.

Back in the nineties ... I had a very successful dating liiiife*

*because I didn't date until the mid aughts

---Portia, wants to pitch this to Netflix as an anti-rom-com for this generation

Question #92306 posted on 06/07/2019 10:52 a.m.
Q:

Dear Terrible Scientist,

What have you and your lab been up to this year?

-Sheebs

A:

Dearest Sheebs,

It is with our deepest sorrow that we must inform you that Terrence "Terry" Scyuentescht, Ph.D. (known colloquially as "Terrible Scientist") passed away this past year. The cause of death at this point is unknown but we are not ruling out foul play. While his most recent research remains unpublished, his assistant Ariana informed us that he had been studying climate change. Holding back tears, she stated that "His research would have saved us all."

-Teresa Mortense

Question #92303 posted on 06/07/2019 10:51 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board and Distinguished Alumni,

After a long, long hiatus, Vienna got me hooked on Survivor again (I stopped watching sometime around Guatemala). I know there are at least a couple of other fans among us, so I wanted to ask: who is your favorite player?

-Frère Rubik wants to see Rick Devens return immediately if not sooner

A:

Dear Frère, 

Bob from Survivor Gabon will forever be my favorite player. This dude makes not one, but TWO fake immunity idols, wins the whole shebang (and still holds the record for oldest winning Survivor) plus gets picked as the season's MVP, and is a former teacher. Obviously the best hands down. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Hi FR,

Congratulations, this was the question that, while lurking, made me decide to actually answer a few.

First and foremost, Devens was a monster who also happened to be a great player. But ugh his white-boy smarm was off the charts, and I'm thrilled he didn't make it to Final Tribal.

Favorite player is rough, not only because there are hundreds to choose from, but because so many have played multiple times, and when they return, I hardly ever end up feeling the same way I did about them originally. Cirie may be the only one who I have loved in every iteration, so I think she'd have to be my answer to this. If Sandra hadn't come back her third time, I think she'd be my easy answer, but her third appearance made me forget what I liked about her.

However as far as individual seasons go, Parvati CHANGED THE GAME on Micronesia (this clip from The Other Two should be in the Louvre). I have gotten into long and deep conversations about what would have happened without Micronesia. I really don't think the show would be on the air still without it.

But also Joe and Malcolm! I must remain true to myself and admit that thirst is a huge factor in mentioning these two, but they are also great players. Joe literally passed out before giving up a challenge, and everybody knows he's so good that he'll never have an actual shot at winning the game. And I want to tell you about Malcolm, but instead you should go back and watch the Philippines season. It's worth it. Also I live about 5 miles down the road from where they film the finales, and even closer to where the after-parties take place, so I've been lucky enough to attend both. Can confirm that both boys are as sweet (and handsome) as they appear on the show.

But really. Watch Micronesia and Philippines.

-Ace

p.s. Look up the Christian clip that Maven mentioned below. One of the funniest moments in 38 seasons.

A:

Dear Frère Rubik,

There are too many great players to mention, so I'll just talk about three that stood out to me:

Older seasons: Cirie. I just adore her happy, mothering, humorous personality combined with her ability to subtly manipulate. She's a master and I have mad respect for her game.

Newer seasons: Christian. I can't help but root for the nerdy, quirky players. I'll never forget the dissertation he gave to Jeff during one of the endurance-based immunity challenges.

Last season: I have mixed feelings about Rick. Yes, he was a great player and of those left in the final episode I was rooting for him. But also did some things that came off a little mean to me. Of course, it's easy to judge players while you're sitting on your couch with snacks, drinks, and a warm blanket.

--Maven

A:

Dear you,

Yau-Man Chan is the survivor G.O.A.T. fight me.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Frere

Stephenie and Cochrane are two of my favorites. 

I love Survivor. I applied once before years ago, and am working on an application video this weekend to apply again. My worst fear wouldn't be getting voted out first (though that would be awful), it would be having so little impact on the game that when I have a one-on-one confessional five episodes into the season everyone watching says "Wait, who is that and when did they sneak on the island???"

-Humble Master

Question #92298 posted on 06/07/2019 10:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did any of you go to SLC pride? Did you like it? Was there anything that you would like to be different?

-stuck in Sunday school

A:

Dear stuck in Sunday school,

I didn't go to SLC pride this year, but I've been there semi-recently, and I have been several times. First of all, I heard the military was recruiting down there this year, and as someone who feels police don't belong at Pride I'm going to go ahead and say that is a lot much. This is especially true what with the current regulations regarding trans people in the military being what they are.

In general, I wish SLC was a little less, dare I say, family friendly. Don't get me wrong. I was there the first year Mormons Building Bridges walked in the parade, and it was a moving experience for a lot of us in attendance. However, after visiting several other Prides and getting to experience a less restricted expression of queer pride in every sense, I wish Salt Lake Pride had more of that. I fear the entire thing is a little too polite. The first Pride was a riot, after all. There is still a lot to be fought for, and there is a lot of trauma to try to shake off for one weekend every year.

- The Black Sheep

A:

Dear yosef,

This isn't exactly an answer, but I'm not sure if any of the writers went this year, so I'll include something related. I wasn’t able to go, but I've been making pins like this:

IMG_0979.jpeg

(I'm not sure how to switch the orientation, so sorry about that.)

I made one first as a gift for a friend who's been in USGA for a couple years, and she said people in the club really liked it so I started making more. Hopefully by next Pride (or just by the next BYU club fair or something like that) I'll have made enough so that anyone who wants one can have one. It's been fun to be creative in a meaningful way, and it's been a great way to stay awake in church. 

Take care,

-Auto Surf

Question #92264 posted on 06/07/2019 10:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Worst rejection story?

-Burn baby burn

A:

Dear Burninator,

Oh man. So many options to choose from! While I have a plethora of rejection stories, there's one that I think was just the worst. Once upon a time when I was but a freshman, I met this cute girl in my orientation group. I asked her out on a date and it was really fun. I didn't talk to her too much after that though. About a month later I decided that she was cool and I wanted to go out with her again. So I called her up and asked her "Hey, what are you doing this Friday?" to which she responded "I'm going on a date with my boyfriend. Why do you ask?"

Not only did I feel the immediate embarrasment of trying to ask out a girl who had a boyfriend, but I was also forced to come up with an explaination for why I was asking her. I was by the Wilk when I called her and while I knew that nobody knew what was going on I felt like all of campus was staring at me and the awkward situation that just went down. I turned bright beet red, came up with some lame excuse, and then hung up in embarassment. Ah good times. It felt terrible at the time but it's a good laugh now.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Burn,

Once upon a time, specifically in 2013 when I was a freshman, my ward was having a get-to-know-you activity. In this activity, I learned that a man in my ward had the last name Disney. As an avid Disney fan, I decided I should get to know him.

So I walked up to him and said in my dry manner, "Hi, I'm Kira. It's nice to meet you. We're going to have to get married." Great start, right? I thought it was funny.

He laughed awkwardly and replied, "Oh, because of the last name?"

I nodded, and he again chuckled.

And then he never spoke to me again.

We were in the ward together for eight months after that and he literally never said another word to me.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Disco Inferno, 

I liked a guy in high school for a long time. He knew I liked him and just didn't say anything about it. We kept hanging out, I planned an elaborate birthday party for him. He didn't talk to me the whole time and dodged my hugs at the end. A few weeks later he came out as gay. It hurt at the time, but now I just laugh. We stayed friends after... it's hard to be offended when the guy literally just isn't attracted to girls in the first place.

 

Also, can I just say that there are lots of cringy rejection stories out there... and sometimes it's fun to hear about them from those who have had to endure them, knowing that eventually you can move on and it'll all turn out alright. I'm glad we can all relate to those. But I do want to take a second to add some perspective and raise some awareness for the countless women and men who have been drugged, raped, abused, assaulted, or even murdered for turning someone down. I think it's fair to say they deserve the title of worst rejection story. Everyone should have the right to reject someone's advances without fearing for their own safety, and we should also be mature enough to handle that kind of event with grace and respect. Sorry for taking the fun out of it, I just didn't feel good about leaving that out. There was a horrible news story this week that reminded me that this is still all too common. Those people who suffer like that ought to be remembered and serve as a reminder to the rest of us to be good sports in the dating field.

Love, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear Burn ~

I don't have any real good rejection stories, but there was one boy that I was head over heels for. I had a 2-week dating curse, and this guy made it 3 weeks. I was ecstatic. He was incredible. We had a great time together. The only thing that bothered me was that he would hold my hand the whole date, but as soon as we entered our apartment complex, he would let go of my hand. Every time.

After 3 weeks he took me on a walk, broke up with me, and told me that it wasn't because there was another girl or anything, he just felt strongly that he should focus on school right now. He was very complimentary and every bit as gracious in his breakup as I would have expected him to be. But I was completely heartbroken.

A week later, in church, in the row in front of me in sacrament meeting, he put his arm around another girl in our complex. They were engaged within a few months. I don't think his roommates even knew we had been dating, because at one point one of his roommates (that I was friends with!) came over to our apartment and started gushing over how cute of a couple he was TO MY FACE until my much more bold roommate chewed him out for it. I was mortified, but thankful to her. 

So that was fun.

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear B3,

I asked this one girl on a date by walking over to her apartment, knocking on her door, and asking her on a lunch date. She replied, "Um, no, I'm busy tomorrow for lunch." So I asked for a different day. The response: "Actually, I'm pretty busy for the next few weeks." I know when I'm being rejected, so I decide to bug out before I look pathetic. I tell her to have a nice day and walk away. I get about 50 feet away from her door before she comes out and yells after me to wait. "This is it!" I think, "she realizes that passing me up isn't worth her busy schedule. She's into me!" I turn around and wait for her to catch up. She looks me in the eyes and says, "I'll tell you what. If something opens up in the next two weeks, I'll call you." Interest lost. Also, she did not call. And she had a boyfriend on the day I asked her in the first place (which I didn't know and she didn't tell me). 

I mean, seriously, chasing after me to string me along like that? Not impressed. Also, I felt like a loser for like a week. I look her up on facebook every so often. She's single.

Best,

The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear burn,

Way back when at BYU, my ward had some kind of opt-in dating event where you got randomly matched with someone else in the ward to go on a date with. I got matched with the Elders' Quorum President who was dumb but attractive so I was like, "Eh, I'll give it a shot." When I called him to set up our date, he told me he was "too busy." No offer to reschedule, no other explanation. Obviously he was just very uninterested! It was a double burn on me because he had actually organized the whole dating match, so the prospect of a date with me must have been really awful for him to just give up on his own event.

Anyway, he's balding and still lives in Provo so apparently I dodged a real bullet.

- Eirene

A:

Dear BBB,

I had a gigantic crush on an emo drummer kid during junior year of high school, and it was no secret. We spent a fair amount of time together. We even went to prom together. In the summer after that prom, my cousin came from out of state to go to EFY with me. She spent a few extra days with my family. As girl cousins of an age, we talked about boys—so she knew all about emo drummer kid.

On my cousin's final night in the state, my friend group did one of our favorite traditions. We laid blankets out in my parents' deep, dark country yard and looked at stars and meteors while low-key cuddling. But during the stargaze, I looked over and saw cousin holding hands with emo drummer kid. For a good long time. They'd known each other for about three days. It broke my little high school heart. 

Months later, the Sunday school lesson was about forgiveness, and I felt like it was just for me. But my mother? My mother has not forgiven cousin to this day.

And, much like the stories above, I definitely dodged a bullet on emo drummer kid. 

On to greener pastures,
Waldorf (& Sauron) 

 

A:

Dear you,

For about a year prior to graduating BYU, I was really interested in this guy. The problem was that we were in the same friend/study group and had the majority of our classes together. Because of all that, I didn't want to ask him on a date or anything--the possibility of things getting super awkward in so many areas of my life was too real. However, a couple of weeks before we graduated, I finally got up courage to ask this guy to dinner. I cooked t-bone steaks, balsamic-vinegar-roasted vegetables, and creme-brulee (which all tasted amazing, by the way). Literally two days later, he was talking all about a big date he had planned for the weekend with some other girl who he was really into, and how important it was to him that this date go really well. Overall, he made it blindingly clear he had zero interest in me--just in this other girl and steak.

I felt probably way too much perverse pleasure when the girl cancelled on him last minute.

Finally, when we graduated the next week, he hardly even looked at me whenever we were talking (you know, despite our being friends for the past few years). BYU photography even got a picture of us having a conversation together, and of course his face is turned the opposite direction from me. My mom picked up on all of this and later told me she thought this guy was kind of a jerk for ignoring me the way he did given how long we'd been friends.

-None

A:

Dear BBB,

After about 45 minutes of talking to a dude on Hinge a few months ago, he asked what area of LA I live in. I told him, and he immediately unmatched. 

And honestly, I respect it.

-Ace

Question #92261 posted on 06/07/2019 10:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm just so stuck with dating right now. Over the past 2 or 3 years there have only been 3 or 4 girls that I've really been interested in, and I did my part in each situation, but nothing really came of it. And I've gone on a lot of other dates during that time as well, but in the end I just wasn't interested enough.

On one hand I recognize that I'm probably being picky, but on the other hand I can't make myself be interested in someone (as much as I genuinely wish I could and have kind of tried before). And I know there's the argument for giving someone a chance (and I think I generally do) and you don't have to be in love with them to date them... but I should at least be excited by the idea of dating them, right? They deserve someone who's excited to date them. I briefly dated someone that I kind of liked who really liked me, and it was a good experience, but eventually I broke up with her which sucked for both of us. And break ups are just a part of dating, I get it, but I really want to at least be excited about dating someone rather than just kind of interested, you know? Otherwise it feels dishonest and not than fun for me anyway.

On top of all that, it's so discouraging to be consistently rejected by the people I do have genuine interest in. There's one girl right now that I'm interested in, but so far it seems more likely that she's not interested than that she is. And I should try to do my part anyway just in case, but she's really busy and it makes it that much harder to get to know her, and knowing that all my energy and effort is probably going to end in rejection anyway is really discouraging.

And maybe you're thinking that I just like "the chase," or just like girls that are "hard to get" or something. I've thought of that. And without explaining it in every little detail, I can say I'm pretty sure that's not the case.

So yeah. I don't know what to do. I'm discouraged by how dating has gone for me for the past... forever. And I would like to start going on more dates but the idea of going on dates with people I'm not interested in just for the sake of dates, or with people I like who statistically speaking are going to reject me, or with people that end up liking me that I then have to reject, is really discouraging as well.

Any advice, or stories, or really any thoughts about this at all would be appreciated. Thanks :)

-Tired

A:

Dear Tired,

I'm sorry that dating sucks right now. I can see why that's so frustrating. Sometimes dating just sucks. It's good to be hopeful and all, but sometimes I think it's also okay to vent and realize that dating sucks. Hopefully writting out this question has helped you feel a little better. If you ever want to talk more about it the 100 Hour Board is always down to listen so feel free to email us okay?

Why does dating suck? I think one of the frustrating thing about dating is the total randomness of it. When you're working on homework you know how much you have left to do and there's often answers you can check in the back of the book. In dating it's totally random. Like, you might be going on plenty of dates but then suddenly nothing happens for a few months. You might be in a relationship that's working and then it suddenly ends. You have no idea what's gonna happen next. You don't know who you'll meet, or how dates will turn out, and all that uncertainty can be frustrating.

But to me that's also the hopeful and super encouraging part of dating. Even if your entire dating life up until now has sucked or has been nonexistent all together, next week you could meet the one and things could just click and turn into a fairy tale ending. Great things are yet to come no matter how unlikely that might feel right now. Try not to be discouraged if the random hot mess that is dating hasn't worked in your favor yet, because sometimes that's just how the randomness goes. When your turn comes it will be unexpected and magical and wonderful.

I've got a great example for you. About a year ago one of my friends just went through a difficult breakup. Over the past few years they had gone through tons of relationships and all of them had ended badly. It seemed like they were trapped in a loop of relationships that didnt last. There was this other person who never really had much of dating life. They had never been in a relationship and not really gone on many dates. It seemed like dating wasn't going all too well for them either.

But then they met each other and started dating. The years of dating fails disappeared and everything was super natural and right. They got engaged and eventually were married! They are an awesome couple and now it's hard to imagine them without each other. The crazy thing though is that just a year ago no one could have expected it. Things weren‘t working and then suddenly they did and it turned out awesome.

The best thing about dating is that it only has to not suck once. You really only need one relationship to work out. It's frustrating dealing with all the in between but once the right person comes along you get to enjoy it AND you get to be done with dating forever so that's nice too.

Hopefully you found this encouraging. Dating can suck sometimes but that's okay. You totally got this and I’m sure that you'll find an awesome relationship! I just can't tell you when cause of the darn random nature of dating. So uh.. keep calm and carry on!

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Tired,

I'm going to try to not be the married person who gives dating advice like it's all easy, but I'm married and I'm about to give you dating advice. So... yeah, take this with a grain of salt.

1) I wouldn't get too bent out of shape that you're breaking up with girls when you find out you're not interested. If you date N people, you will break up with N-1 of them (or so). Most romantic relationships fail. Maybe that's a cynical way of looking at it, but it's also kind of freeing. If you're dating someone and you're not that interested, that's fine! That's most relationships! Being honest with that person about your feelings and moving on is perfectly acceptable.

2) To your other point about dating for the sake of dating: that's right where I was when I met my wife. I was dating this girl who didn't even know who I was. She kept calling me Mark (not my name, Board Question #77014). Once, after our first date (where she called me Mark) but before our second date (called me Mark), she invited me over because she was studying for the GRE and wanted help. I threw on my jacket, rushed to her place, and ... SPENT THE EVENING HELPING HER STUDY AFTER WHICH SHE SHOWED ME OUT. <deep breath> I mean, seriously. But, I didn't stop asking her out "because," I said to myself, "I don't hate her and I may as well be going on dates." It was a sad time. Then I met my wife. All of a sudden, dating was natural. We spent time together because we wanted to. We sought out times to be together instead of fitting them into our schedules. We fell in love and got married. The end.

I'm not going to say that it will happen that way for you, but there are worse things than having your line in the water. You get to meet people, find out what you like (and what you hate), and have (mostly) good experiences (and, if not, good stories to tell). I know it sucks, but from reading your question, I don't think you're doing anything wrong either. Not sure if that's comforting or not, but there it is.

Best,

The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear tired,

It's Pride Month, which means you're legally obligated to only date men for the month of June. Sorry, buddy, I don't make the rules. Hope that helps your odds.

-Cognoscente

A:

Dear you,

Well, I almost gave up hope after reading your question. I think you're dwelling too much on the past. Obviously you have to look at the past, but I think instead of just observing the past, you're dwelling there. You've set up a tent and started roasting a smore. You better not burn your marshmallow (unless that's how you like it, but that's a different problem).

Anyways, all it takes is one girl. I didn't have much success in the dating world, but I found the love of my life and now I don't care how my previous dating was. Maybe it will be the next one, or the one after that, or the one after that, or the one after that, or the one after that, or the one after that, or the one after that, or the one after that, or the one after that. But I think you'll eventually be successful.

Here's to trying until it works!

-Sunday Night Banter (motivational extraordinaire)

Question #92080 posted on 06/07/2019 10:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So electric cars are fun, but we’re burning coal to create electricity and use a ton of carbon to make steel and batteries have really nasty metals in them so exactly how good for the environment are electric cars?

-Seriously wondering. Does all of this outweigh driving a pre-existing working car that burns gasoline?

A:

Wondering,

It depends a lot on how your state generates power and what car you get. This video gives a really good breakdown that includes just how much variability there is in the market and what that means for you as a consumer.  Basically, in general, electric cars are better for the environment. But you can get it wrong when buying an electric car. Most electric cars will make up the difference within 5 years, but if that car dies before it makes up it's difference then it will be a net loss, especially if you're in a coal-powered state. 

You can find lots of people using data to claim electric cars are barely better, but I honestly would be very wary of them. Watch their videos, consider their argument. But remember that low emission countries are completely committing to electric cars. I think there is a reason it is the go-to topic when we talk about cutting emissions. 

Solving the battery problem will crack this issue wide open. In fact, it will crack a lot of environmental problems. So look forward to that, because honestly I think we're on the brink of just insanely good batteries. 

Babalugats

A:

Dear Seriously,

My electric car is powered by the solar panels on my roof. No coal involved. (I don't know how they got the electricity to make my solar panels, but we would have gotten them even if we didn't have an electric car, so I'm neglecting that detail here.)

This is also not my intellectual forte, but Yellow showed me this graphic from this tweet from this source the other day, and I think it's pertinent to this conversation to see that there are some cities that are working hard to provide electricity without burning coal. This shows the UK's electricity from coal. (I just wish it were in Utah...)

 D756iOaXoAAzg4x.jpg-large.jpeg

~Dragon Lady

A:

Dear Reader,

Dragon Lady's car aside, you're right in that most electric cars charge up using electricity made mostly from burning natural gas or coal. Let's take a look at how that works out.

Let's take a look at a gas-powered car that gets 25 mpg. The energy density of gasoline is 45 Megajoules (MJ) per kilogram and the mass density is 2.83 kilograms per gallon. So... 45 MJ/kg * 2.83 kg/gal = 127.4 MJ/gal * (1 gal / 25 mi) = 5.1 Megajoules of energy per mile driven. In other words, that car takes 5 million joules of energy to drive a mile. That might sound like a lot, but 5 million joules is 1.4 kilowatt hours (which cost about $0.20 each when you get them from your electric company), and is approximately the amount of energy it takes to operate an electric oven for 30 minutes or so.

Now let's look at a Tesla Model 3 (2019, Standard Range) which boasts a 50 kWh battery and a range of 220 miles. A quick calculation would yield 50 kwh / 220 miles = 0.23 kWh/mile or less than 1 million joules per mile. It's 5 times more efficient! But wait! We haven't taken into account the energy that went into the power plant to create the 50 kWh of energy. The average energy efficiency of fossil fuels is about 35%. So to make 50 kWh of energy, you need to put in 50/0.35 = 143 kWh of fuel. 50 kWh of the 143 turns into energy, but the rest is wasted as heat. Re-doing our calculation, we find that the true energy cost of a Tesla charged by fossil fuels is 143/220 = 0.65 kWh / mile which is about 2.3 Megajoules per mile. Not as good as before, but still twice as efficient as the 25 mpg car.

To get to that 2.3 MJ/mi figure, a gasoline car would need to have a fuel efficiency rating of at least 55 mpg. What's really cool about this is that 5 years ago, when I started paying attention to the electric car market, the best electric cars were about the same as a 30 mpg gasoline car. Now, the best electric cars are WAY better in terms of energy efficiency. Now, as you pointed out, there are other concerns with batteries, shelf life, etc. But electric cars are quickly making it. Awesome.

Best,

The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear wondering,

The other writers have covered the question of whether an electric car is actually more environmentally friendly than a gas-powered car, but your question gets at an important point: there are no truly environmentally-friendly cars. Every car is made with plastic (a petroleum product) and metal (mining uses a ton of water and can lead to some truly nasty contamination). Every car has brakes and tires, which shed toxic metal and rubber particles when used. Every car drives on roads, which are made with either asphalt (again, a petroleum product) or concrete (the source of nearly a tenth of the world's CO2 emissions). Cars strike and kill hundreds of millions of animals every year, and some species have experienced measurable evolutionary changes in response to cars and roads.

Cars are also terrible for human health. Traffic collisions are the 9th leading cause of death worldwide. Texas hasn't gone a single day without a car-related fatality in nearly two decades. Sitting for hours at a time is awful for your body. Long commutes have a demonstrable negative effect on mental health and family cohesion.

None of this is a knock against electric vehicles. I drive a hybrid, and I'd love my next car to be all-electric. But transitioning from internal combustion engines to electric motors is harm reduction, not a permanent solution. The only truly environmentally friendly alternative is to reduce vehicle miles traveled.

When we moved earlier this year, my wife and I made the conscious decision to live within walking distance of my job. I get more exercise (because let's be honest, I'd never get any exercise at all if I didn't walk to work), and we don't have to sink thousands of dollars into a second car. This is only possible because California has been moving towards allowing higher-density development, in our case an accessory dwelling unit. We could never survive with just one car if we still lived in Utah.

If we're going to be serious about reducing our environmental impact, we can't just move to a different, less damaging form of consumption. We have to actually reduce our consumption. And in order to do that, we need to seriously reconsider some of our assumptions about the role of cars and the way we build our cities.

-yayfulness

Question #92259 posted on 06/07/2019 10 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any members of the Church played on Survivor? Which seasons? I'd look at it myself, but I don't want to know when they get voted out.

-Binge-watching Survivor

A:

Dear wilson,

Yes, there are a number of Utahns and members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (no, not necessarily saying the two are correlated, but I am giving you a General Idea) who have competed on Survivor. 

BYU professor Dawn Meehan competed and [oh right you don't want the result] in 2013. She discusses her initial selection here, and was actually competing against another LDS contestant (Rick Nelson, from Aurora, Idaho) at the time. There's a lovely discussion of that season written by the Deseret News, which does spoil when people lose, and which lists at least three additional contestants up until 2013 who probably meet your criteria, those being Neleh Dennis (Survivor: Marquesas), Tyson Apostal (2009, 2011, 2012), Ashlee Ashby (Survivor: Palau) and Kelly Wiglesworth (original season), who was "Mormon-raised."

You might also enjoy the Salt Lake Tribune article "The top 15 Mormons on reality TV," which discusses, well, a variety of shows, and definitely gives away Survivor rankings. 

Additional Church members who have competed on Survivor besides those I've mentioned are in an LDS Living article (am I linking to LDS Living? How low I have sunk, for I despise them) called 7 Latter-day Saints Who Held Their Own on CBS' "Survivor". It will also tell you how they ranked, so I tell you, in no particular order, people I've missed so far:

  • Rafe Judkins, Survivor: Guatemala (2005)
  • Jeff Kent, Survivor: Phillipines (2012)

Okay, 4 for 7. I'd say my internet survival rate is passable.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Binge

Some day I hope to be added to this list. Preferably soon. But any day, really (It's not imminent).

-Humble Master

posted on 06/07/2019 1:07 p.m.
There is also Todd Herzog from Survivor: China. Dawn Meehan has been my favorite LDS contestant, but Todd is a close second.

-Vienna, who was going to add a flagette to this question, but forgot to do so before it posted
Q:

Hey 100 Hour Board,

Tell me something cool about campus that not a lot of people know about.

-Zebra

A:

Dear Zebra,

Ardilla Feroz is the real expert, but I happen to have a few tricks of my own up my sleeve. Are you ready for some deep campus knowledge? I'm just gonna list them off bullet point style 'cause right now I'm too tired to write with coherent organization.

  • The HBLL has tons of librarians who specialize in specific topics. I found out about them in a technical writing class and they are so helpful. I've met with my subject librarian about a dozen times now and he's helped me with class assignments, research, and even with my internship. Subject librarians may be the best kept secret on campus.
  • Some of the coat closet looking rooms in the MARB are actually offices. One time I went to visit a professor's office hours and was very shocked to find an office in what I previously assumed was a janitorial closet.
  • There is a full blown drone racing course in the basement of the Engineering Building. If you want to you can show up to the BYU Drone Racing club and they'll teach you how to fly. They even check out drones for students to practice on.
  • There's a greenhouse south of Kiwanis park that's run by BYU. It's pretty awesome and they use it for all sorts of classes and research. However, if you ask nicely they'll often let you study there.
  • There's a wall panel in the basement of the HFAC that leads to a series of interconnected rooms inside the foundations of the building. The rooms are filled with dirt and you can travel around quite a bit before eventually coming up in a trap door behind one of the stages. If you want to know how to find it email me and I'll send you the details.
That's all I can think of right now but there are plenty of secrets to find on BYU campus. Adventure is out there!
 
Tipperary
A:

Dear Donna,

The Family History section of the HBLL is open two Sunday afternoons a month (as well as during normal library hours). There's a photo scanner and a feed scanner (takes a stack of papers and scans them all!), which are really helpful for getting those papers cleaned up. Definitely an under-used resource.

Oh, and there are lockers available to rent in the library. Do that.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Zebra, 

The McKay Building has a classroom in the basement that they use for a teacher's methods science course. It's the literal worst because 1) no windows and 2) no Wi-Fi. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Zebra,

The stacks in Special Collections in the library can move back and forth, so they can fit more in and just move them to access what they need. But they don't have motion sensors for safety! So don't get caught inside them when they're moving, or you'll become the next Flat Stanley.

~ Dragon Lady

At least, this was the case 12 years ago when I worked there. I suppose there's always the possibility that they changed things since I left.

A:

Dear Zebra,

Every now and then they'll do work on the roof of the SWKT and leave the doors to the roof open or unlocked. You have to take the elevator to the 11th floor and climb the stairs to the roof. I've been up there a few times when they left the door open. It's a fantastic view.

If you can't get to the roof, enjoy the view through the windows on the 11th floor (though you may need to knock to be let into some rooms).

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear friend,

I'm not sure if this is common knowledge or not but if you see enough International Cinema films in a semester, you can get a free t-shirt. And, you get to watch a bunch of fascinating movies.

Also, consider the power of BYU's Interlibrary Loan service. You can get any book in the world. Any book. For free. Do you realize how magical that is?

-Van Goff

A:

Dear Zebra,

In front of the Clyde is one of those square metal hatches on the ground. It's usually locked close, but at least once during the last 5 years it was open slightly for a day or two, and it was possible for one to climb down into the extensive tunnel network below campus. Or... for the cosmic terrors from below to find their way to the surface. It is likely that this or another door will open again. 

May we be far away when that happens.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear El-Ahrairah,

Tunnel hatches? NOTED.

Dear zebby cakes,

I wrote about this same idea in Board Question #87840.

But for something new, seconding something mentioned by Tipperary--there's a huge dirt room in the basement of the HFAC that is currently accessible to those who know how to look. Since rumor has it the HFAC is going to be destroyed by people who never appreciated it...

...best to visit it before it's gone. Look for the open-able panel in the wall. Take a flashlight, take a friend (I'll show you, if you want) and email me at ardilla.feroz@theboard.byu.edu if you need more info. And send me pictures, darling, I always enjoy our visits.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz

Question #92170 posted on 06/07/2019 9:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I apologize in advance for the length of this question and how long it will probably take me to get to the question. I am currently finishing up my 2nd year here at BYU and will probably graduate in 2-3 years. My friends all thought it was a joke that I came here because I was out to most people as gay in high school and don't really have a testimony in the Church of Jesus Christ. One specific moment that I remember is a teacher that I was very close to, telling me that he was worried about me coming to BYU and that while he probably shouldn't say anything to keep track of my emotional health and leave if I need to.

But nevertheless, I came. Why did I come? I thought that by coming to BYU I could show everyone in my life that I had least given being a member of the Church of Jesus Christ a fair shot by going all in and forcing myself to decide if I believe or not. Also, like most everyone here, I recognized that it was a high ranked school and wouldn't force me to go into too much debt.

However, while being here, I think that I, unfortunately, have lost whatever testimony I had before and am planning to leave the Church of Jesus Christ when I no longer attend a CES school. I continue to date people of the same-gender because it's been very difficult feeling so alone here, especially when all of my friends are getting married and that's one of the things I want most. Basically, I'm not the student that BYU wants here and as I already had mental health issues before attending BYU, they've only seemed to get worse with my time here.

The problem is that I've already made connections and plans based on a future where I graduate from BYU. I like the programs that I am in and the opportunities that I am offered and plan to take advantage of them to the fullest. And although it's been hard and I still feel alone with no friends, I've been able to find places in Provo where I feel safe and can cope with my situation.

My first question: is it ethically wrong for me to stay at BYU despite no longer believing in the Church of Jesus Christ, having full intentions of leaving after graduation, and occasionally dating people of the same gender? Even though I do not believe in the system, is it wrong for me to be taking advantage of it so much? Am I taking the spot of someone who wants to be at BYU and is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ?

And second: is it worth it for me to stay here? I've thought about transferring but that feels like starting over and I don't like change. Also, it would be a lot harder financially, would take longer for me to get my degree, and I would lose out on some of the opportunities I have already planned for here. How would you weight the cost-benefit of getting an education that I'm excited about (my major along with study abroad and the honors program), with the cost of not feeling like I have as much room to make the decisions that I want to make like explore other religions and date other queer people, and the mental health cost of feeling unsafe and like an evil person in my environment.

Did I just ask a group of strangers to weigh in on my future? Absolutely.


-Gary Coleman

A:

Dear Gary,

Those are very complex questions, and difficult to answer without knowing you personally and what your long-term goals are. But I want to make a really, really important point.

You are certainly not evil. Not in the slightest. I sincerely hope you never think that. If anyone at BYU or in the Church ever makes you feel that way, they are the ones at fault.

Now on to your actual questions.

1. Personally, I do not think it's unethical to stay at BYU even if you do not have a testimony. BYU accepted you, and I believe that BYU could benefit from more people with diverse opinions, with doubts and concerns and even disbelief. However, it is possible that dating people of the same sex would be unethical, because you signed the Honor Code. The Honor Code does prohibit same-sex dating and you agreed to abide by it for the duration of your time at BYU. Only you can decide if doing so anyway would violate your personal sense of ethics. However, be aware that it will violate BYU's sense of ethics, and you could be at risk of suspension or expulsion if the university becomes aware of your behavior.

2. Based on that, I only think you should stay at BYU if you're willing to fully abide by the Honor Code for the duration of your undergrad program. But be aware that my advice is coming from someone who inherently avoids risk. I don't like uncertainty, and I don't like the unexpected. I like to have a plan, and to execute that plan with no interruptions. So from a personal perspective, I wouldn't want to live in fear that the Honor Code Office could crack down at any day. I wouldn't want to have to drop classes I was excited for in the event of suspension, or scramble to apply to other universities in the event of expulsion. 

I also believe that college is a time of sacrifice. Yes, you're a young adult and you can celebrate having your first taste of real freedom, but getting an education requires a sacrifice of time, sleep, a social life, and more. In my view, those sacrifices are worthwhile, because not only do you get an education and a degree, but you learn diligence and to prioritize, crucial skills that you will use throughout your life. 

However, some sacrifices are not worthwhile. Your health, for instance. I don't know you well enough to say how remaining at BYU would affect your mental health. If you wake up every day sad or angry that you're sacrificing such major parts of yourself, or if you're counting down the days until you graduate and can get away, I would say it's not worth it. If your pursuit of education is overshadowed by personal and social dissatisfaction, it's not worth it.

I can't tell you what to do, but here's how I would weigh the factors of staying vs. going, in order of importance.

  1. Mental Health: this is the most important thing. If you're constantly unhappy or depressed, you should make a change. If you're unhappy some of the time but otherwise thriving in your academic environment, do you think you can maintain those feelings for the 2-3 years it will take you to graduate? How great an effect would sacrificing dating or religious exploration have on your mental health and sense of personal stability?
  2. Cost: BYU is an economic slam dunk, especially for the quality of education it provides. Few other education options will set you up for a lifetime of financial success the way BYU does, with cheap tuition and plentiful scholarship opportunities. Research other universities that offer your major and see how their overall costs compare. Are there scholarship opportunities, or a variety of on-campus jobs available? What would interest rates be if you needed to take out student loans? How would your hypothetical salary be able to accommodate loan payments?
  3. Time to Earn Degree: If the cost is right and your mental health would be better at another institution, consider your long-term goals and current financial situation. In the grand scheme of things another year or two is not that long. Look at potential credit transfers and see how many of your classes could contribute to a degree at another university. Explore the possibility of taking summer classes.
  4. Study Abroad/Honors Program: There's a good chance you can find other universities that have similar offerings. It may not be exactly the same, but many do offer these unique educational experiences.

I think if I were in your position, I would probably stay at BYU, but that's with limited knowledge of and experience with your personal struggles. I don't like change either, and I chafed under some of the provisions of the Honor Code, but the sacrifices I made to attend BYU were worthwhile for me. I graduated without any student debt, and now at the age of 24 I have savings. I might even get to retire someday, and I have BYU to thank for that. 

I sincerely hope you find some reconciliation of your feelings and are able to make a decision that you're happy with.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear you,

If you stay at BYU, get yourself three sealed transcripts at the end of each semester so that if you ever have to *cough* forcibly transfer, you won't face logistical barriers. $45/semester is good insurance.

I have deep sympathy for the questions you're facing, but I also want to assure you that you're far from the first to face it and you won't be the last.

I would argue that by working hard at school and valuing your program, you're arguably using BYU more ethically than a temple-worthy, true-believing member who sluffs all their classes and ambles through with a C because they're busy having heterosexual NCMOs in their apartment complex's hot tub every night. Others would disagree with me. That's fine; the point is that of BYU's approximately 30,000 students, I think most of them have some aspect or another in which they're less "worthy" of their place than a student who is rejected. The same is true of most universities, regardless of CES affiliation. Evaluating who is or is not deserving of a spot at a university is arbitrary and difficult.

-Zedability

Question #92307 posted on 06/07/2019 2:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How does it make you feel knowing there is a spooky skeleton inside you?

-Skelly

A:

Dear Skelly,

Sturdy.

-->Captain Obvious

A:

Dear Skeleton, 

Actually, I do not have a spooky skeleton inside of me, because I am not a human. So I guess I feel... different! 

boop

- Janet

A:

Dear SK, 

It would be pretty weird if the Board had a skeleton, seeing as it's a website... 

Cheers,

Guesthouse

A:

Dear Skelly,

Your teeth are bones that live outside that hang from your lips like bats. Oh outside bones, outside bones, never forget your teeth are outside bones! They're bones that you wash, and when you're a kid they fall from your head, and to make things less weird we say they got stolen by a demon that your parents know.

- Titus Andromedon

A:

Dear Skellington,

It's friends with the spooky ghost inside me. 

-El-ahrairah

A:

Oh yeah?!

Well this is all I can say to that. I feel like this has been exhaustively covered:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cF-S7K0Cpus

Skell you later,

Toasteroven