"I like fiery passion, actually." - Olympus
Question #92030 posted on 02/14/2019 6:40 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I know you're all busy, I'm busy too, but I've been feeling the need to ask this question:

Is anyone interested in being a pen pal? Where is a good place to find pen pals? I've been struggling with my life really and the realization that although I have a lot of friends, I don't really open up to people and have deep conversations because I'm either too tired when I'm at evening activities (the only ones available) or I feel really insecure because the last couple of times I've tried to really open up to people, I've been harshly rejected later.

So what I'm really looking for is someone who I can write to and get to know them and possibly become friends without the hassle of leaving my home.

-Miss Frazzled

P.S. I've just started learning Spanish and I know a little German, so if you or anyone you know would be interested in being a pen pal for either language, that would be awesome too. I have a hard enough time talking in English, it's almost impossible for me to practice foreign languages, but writing is easier.

A:

Dear Miss Frazzled,

I would genuinely love to be your pen pal, if you're interested. I feel kind of the same way; there aren't many people in my life that I trust enough to be truly open with my feelings, and it can feel a little bit lonely when I really want to talk things out with someone.

Unless you happen to live in Central Florida, I'll never pressure you to leave your home, so I'm a totally safe option.

I haven't studied Spanish in many years so you probably know more than me but if you want to try and muddle through a conversation, I would be down. I can't help you with German though, sorry.

If you'd like, you're welcome to email me at luciana@theboard.byu.edu.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Miss Frazzled,

Sup. If you want you can email me at tipperary@theboard.byu.edu.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Frazzled,

My email is always open: anathema@theboard.byu.edu. Unfortunately I can't help with either language, but I'm down to just chat.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Miss Frizzle,

I would LOVE to be your pen pal! I know what you mean about it being hard to open up to people, and also not wanting to leave your home, because I feel the same way. But I genuinely love writing letters by hand and am pretty good about carrying on a correspondence that way, so being a pen pal is right up my alley. I also speak Spanish (but not German), and would be happy to write you in Spanish if that's what you want. Feel free to email me at alta@theboard.byu.edu to get things started.

If anyone else out there wants a friend/pen pal/email pal, you can also shoot me an email! I guarantee you that if you're reading this and feeling lonely, I would truly love to talk with you and get to know you. You matter and are so important, and I'm sure I would like you. 

-Alta 

posted on 02/15/2019 8:20 a.m.
There are a number of websites that try to facilitate pen-pal'ing connections. I can vouch for a free smartphone app called SLOWLY, which doesn't involve exchanging physical addresses (good for safety!), but imitates the slowness of snail mail by making it take a couple of days for messages to get delivered around the world. It also offers a ton of detailed search filters so you can (for example) message people of your same gender who are at least 20 years old, have intermediate-level proficiency in German and Spanish, and enjoy talking about religion and books.

-another pen-pal'er
Question #91942 posted on 02/14/2019 12:10 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I’m looking for a book to help me study the Bible (Old & New Testaments). I’d like it to give historical context, explain the language, and help me understand doctrinal points in the framework of that Biblical time period. Any ideas?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear Friend, 

I've never personally read any of these,  but here's what the Internet and several Religious Ed professors recommended:

Theological Lexicon of the Old Testament by Ernst Jenni & Claus Westermann, translated by Mark Biddle. (There's also one for the New Testament) - this focuses largely on the translation/language, but also focuses on how those words were important and how they were used in historical context. Personally, I think these are your best bet. They also seemed to be pretty highly rated online. 

Misreading Scripture with Western Eyes by E. Randolph Richards and Brandon J. O'Brien. This is one of the ones that people lately have been talking about the most. It'll help orient the Bible in its actual context. 

Harper's Encyclopedia of Bible Life - This mostly focuses on the history and culture at the time of the Bible. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear Saint,

Tally M. has really liked using the one linked here. It is an in-depth explanation of every verse in the new testament. It's a project by Kevin Barney who has published several LDS books and is a religious scholar. It seems to contain a lot of the info that you are looking for. 

-Spectre