"I would rather entertain and hope that people learned something than educate people and hope they were entertained. " - Walt Disney
Question #92037 posted on 02/28/2019 2:46 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the happiest thing that's happened to you in 2019 so far?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear friend, 

I planned a trip to Hawaii with my boyfriend and the rest of our group of friends! We're going right after finals and then hanging out in LA for a bit after. I'm excited to be able to take a vacation and relax after another year of classes. Motivation to finish the semester strong!

Aloha, 

Guesthouse 

A:

Dear MNH,

My little sister got accepted into BYU! Aaaaaaaaahhhhhhh!!!!!!! I’m so happy! I can’t wait for fall semester. We’ll get to go to school together and I can’t even!!!

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear Aziraphale,

Getting plane tickets to Japan. 

~Anathema

P.S. Something else that was super cool, but was more of a fan girl experience was meeting Christine Darden (like, I was able to talk with her personally) and hearing her talk about her life. She is so legit and my hero in life.

A:

Dear you,

I got engaged! So that was pretty fantastic. No more long-distance relationships!

I'm also pretty dang happy because, as some of you may know, I've been applying to PhD programs for political science and so far I've been accepted to Stanford, Princeton, MIT, UCLA, and Duke! Still not sure where I'll go but I'm just grateful I wasn't rejected from every school I applied to (which I genuinely thought might happen).

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear chicken fangs,

I went caving recently and enjoyed myself quite a bit. I wanted to go caving with a local group, and since they didn't have anything planned I pinned a date down and got things planned. It was during the semester, and so not everyone who wanted to participate was available, but in the end a dozen people gloriously crawled into a rock and made it perhaps three quarters of a mile into the chilly earth before we retreated from the subterranean realm and the remote but horrifying possibility of turtle people (TURTLE PEOPLE, THE MOVIE: COMING SLOWLY TO A THEATRE NEAR YOU).

This week I'm performing in a ballet, and sticking with that and working towards it despite personal insecurities, frustrations and setbacks is, for me, something worth achieving.

Suerte.

--Ardilla Feroz

Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have two related questions. 1) What is your favorite childhood memory? 2) What do you plan to do to create good memories for your current or future or hypothetical children?

-Rainbow connection

A:

Dear you,

First off: awwwwww, this is a great question. Picking just one is hard, but I think in general I would pick watching football games with my dad. We went to 2-3 games a year from about 6th grade to when I graduated high school. This last year I went to a game with my dad for the first time since I graduated and I realized how much I missed watching games with him.

My plan to create good memories for my future children is to spend time with them and be involved with their lives. My dad always gets involved with our extracurricular activities and hobbies and hobbies. He's been a scout master, coached little league, judged debate tournaments, taught elementary school band, etc. He does what we enjoy even if it's not his favorite. I think the cutest example of this right now is my little sister is really into Harry Potter. My dad's not into the fantasy genre at all, but he's been reading the books to her before bed, and watching the movies, and he got her a Hufflepuff costume for Halloween. He's planning a trip to Harry Potter World and I'm so excited for my little sister to go. I think my dad set a real good example for us of how to spend quality time with kids and I hope I can live up to it.

Peace,

Tipperary

A:

Dear RC,

1. Playing night games with the kids in my neighborhood. I did this from ages 11 to 18 and every holiday I spent at home afterwards. We'd play inspector (one person, the inspector, walks a certain length while everyone sneaks behind him/her trying to not get caught when the inspector randomly looks back), blind tag (like tag on a playground but the person out has their eyes closed and the others can't touch the ground), and trail (everyone runs across the field and if you get tagged by the person who's out you join him/her until everyone is out). 

Last year my little sister, who was 15 at the time, was designated by all the kids as the leader of the night games, so we'd have 6-8 year olds coming to our house at night to ask if she was planning on getting everyone together. She invited me to join them and I had a kick playing with all these kids who used to be toddlers and too young to play night games during my time. Also looking young is great when a group of kids instantly accept you, a 22 year old, into their group.

2. Live near a playground. Or get a trampoline.

-guppy of doom

A:

Dear Kermit, 

What a happy, sweet, wonderful question! 

My favorite childhood memory is not really a single childhood memory, but a collection of them. When I was growing up, my dad used to take me and my siblings on all sorts of camping trips to southern Utah. I think I brought this up briefly in Board Question #91959

I remember listening to John Denver, Norah Jones, Billy Joel, Journey, Shania Twain, U2, and a whole spattering of 80s hits as we would drive down to Capitol Reef or Zion's or Bryce or Arches during the summer time. I was listening to John Denver today and just thinking about it actually made me cry. (I cry happy tears a lot). When I think about it a bit, I can feel the cold desert air at 6 am when I would wake up with the sun and have to knock the sand out of my shoes. I remember my dad would always cook us camping omelettes in a Dutch Oven, and they were amazing. One year he checked us out of school on a Friday and we drove down to Goblin Valley and stayed there over Halloween. It was freezing, but it was so much fun to play hide-and-seek among the hoodoos. I remember the first time my dad took me rappelling and I cried the whole time because I was terrified. My family has a rite-of-passage where you have to hike Mt. Timpanogos when you turn 8. I'm the oldest, so I got to go with my dad alone, and now I've gone every year since. He used to call me "M.G." which was short for "Mountain Goat" and even though I acted like I was embarrassed, I always loved it. It made me feel special. My love of the outdoors and my hiking hobby I owe entirely to my dad, and I'm really grateful for that. I also have fun memories with my siblings out in the wilderness of Utah. I've conquered a lot of mountains and trails with my family. 

As I've grown, my dad and I haven't gotten along as well as we used to. It's mostly my fault, I think. We disagree about a lot of things, and I'm still learning how to be mature about working through our disagreements. I'm working on being better to him and visiting more often and showing him that I still love him and care about him, because I think I did some damage as a teenager that I want to fix now. These memories are really meaningful to me because I can look back and remember that my dad really loves me and those camping and hiking trips are so integral to who I am as a person, and I have him to thank. 

I want to make sure my kids have similar experiences. I want to take them hiking and camping often and I want them to feel nostalgic when they listen to different kinds of music. I can't expect they'll have the same feelings as I do about my memories, but I really want to make sure that when my kids grow up and become annoying teenagers, they have a healthy handful of undeniable experiences in their memory bank that remind them that their parents love them no matter what, and that even though sometimes life is hard, your family is where you are happiest. I haven't planned out all the places I want to visit with them, but I think maybe I'll organize some outings with my dad so my kids can have some hiking memories with Grandpa. 

And because I'm answering this late at night and I'm kinda really emotional about it, here's a picture for you. 

Guesthouse and Dadhouse.jpg

Cheers, 

Guesthouse, a daddy's girl

A:

Dear Rainbow,

I have a lot of nice childhood memories, like playing at the park with my siblings, special one-on-one treat times with my mom, etc. But I think my favorite memory is a family road trip that we took when I was about ten. My mom's family is from Michigan and one of her sisters still lived there, so all the cousins headed out that way for a week or so one summer. I remember staying in a house by a big lake and swimming a lot. We went fishing, played games, and generally had a grand old time.

My main plan for building memories with my future kids is to have some built-in individual time with them in our normal routines. Most of the things I really remember are things that I did over and over again. They were special because of their consistency in my life, and I want my future kids to have that too.

-Quixotic Kid

A:

Dear Connection,

My favorite childhood memory isn't so much one specific memory of one specific day. Instead, I would have to say it was going to the park with my parents. We had this great park close to our house growing up, and I LOVED it when my mom would take me there because it was always sure to be a fun time and I just loved parks. Similarly, there was a field behind my elementary school where my dad would take us to fly kites when it was windy, and I loved those days. Flying kites with my dad always made me feel like I was special and unique because he took the time to help me individually, and as the fourth of five kids I felt like I didn't necessarily get a ton of one-on-one time with my parents. I've also got to mention our yearly family vacations, too, because even though they weren't to super fancy places, I always looked forward to them for months.

To create good memories for my future children, I want to take interest in the things that interest them. My husband is so good about taking at least a cursory interest in the things that interest people he cares about, just so he can support those people in a way that's meaningful to them. For example, he started watching anime because his younger sister was really into it and he wanted to relate to her better. Maybe my future kids will hate parks, so taking them there frequently wouldn't be enjoyable for them, and if that's the case I want to find what DOES matter to them and do that. I also just want to expose them to a lot of different activities, because they probably won't like them all, but the more we do the higher the likelihood of finding something they love.

-Alta

A:

Dear Skittles,

It was my ninth birthday. My parents had set up a scavenger hunt all around the house and backyard, with clues that eventually lead to my presents. Once I had figured out the last clue, I rushed to the room with the presents to find a white cage, feeder, and water bottle. My mom then told me I was going to pick out a baby bunny to live in that cage later in the day, after my dad came home from work. The rest of the day was then spent in absolute excitement and anticipation of my soon to be pet. Once my dad finally came home, we drove over to get my bunny. I chose a butterscotch colored bunny that had one long ear that stuck straight up, and another that hung down along its head. It was impossibly soft, and I absolutely loved it.

It was real sad when I came home from a vacation to Lake Powell later in the summer only to find the bunny had died, but let's not talk about that.

~Anathema

P.S. I want to create magical moments for my kids and grandkids. I want to take them for walks along beautiful paths in nature, teach them to fly a kite, dance midst swirls of bubbles, and stand in awe of spectacular sunsets.

Question #92060 posted on 02/28/2019 2:04 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a friend who I like to spend time with.... however they constantly burp out loud and it's driving me insane. I either have to leave the room or put headphones in with music blasting, which makes it hard to concentrate. I wonder if they just don't notice this is kinda gross to do in public, or if they just don't think it's gross? I enjoy spending time with this person, but they are just a little too un-hygenic for myself. If the advice would be to just tell them kindly, what would be a good way to do this? plz help!

-Slightly Disgusted

A:

Dear SD,

Your two options are to either tell them or deal with it. I would not ask them to stop burping, because most of the time burping is involuntary and they really don't have any control of it. It would be like asking them to stop coughing. That isn't going to help anyone. You may however want to kindly ask them to close or cover their mouth. For example you could say "Excuse me, but would you mind covering your mouth when you burp?" If you bring it up, I wouldn't bring it up more than once

Whether or not I would tell them depends on how sensitive they are and how strong of friends you are with them. If you're good friends and you think they'd take it well then you may want to mention it. if you aren't really good friends with them, or you don't think they'd take it well, you might be better off just dealing with it. Personally, my suggestions would just be dealing with it. Hope this helps.

Peace,

Tipperary