"Barring polygamy, you will break up with every person you date minus one." - Yellow
Question #92743 posted on 11/04/2019 4:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does the design of this site seem antiquated to you? Are there any plans to redesign it?

- Some Web Designer

P.S. I'm not soliciting services.

A:

Dear Some You-Hoo,

If it ain't broke, why fix it?

But to be honest, I love how the 100 Hour Board looks. When I started reading 13 years ago, it looks exactly the same as it is now. So, it's a bit nostalgic for me.

-Goldie Rose

A:

Dear Designer Dude,

Actually, I was thinking about this the other day. I'm usually super judgmental about website design, but for some reason the 100 Hour Board doesn't bother me. I might even be a little sad if we updated it. Something about it is charming to me. Maybe that's just nostalgia, or maybe it really does have something to do with the current design. Who knows?

Best,

Josefina

A:

Dear Peter Parker, 

Yes, it does seem antiquated to me. 

Yes, there are plans to redesign it.

In fact, I've seen the work in progress, and it looks snazzy. We are taking into account a lot of improvement ideas, like a continuous scroll on the homepage so you don't have to go through the archives all the time, and to prevent days with an empty homepage. I think when it eventually gets put out into the world, you'll be really satisfied with it. 

The process is just taking a long time and a bit of Board bureaucracy... now that you've mentioned it, I think it's time I discuss this again with the appropriate parties to see what we can do. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

Question #92740 posted on 11/04/2019 9:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Friends,

Once I pour milk into my cinnamon-y cereal, is it a beverage, broth, or sauce? Defend your answer, I want opinions!

(No I did not see this question online and steal it, I don't know what you're talking about.)

-Goldie Rose

A:

Dear Goldie,

My first thought when I read this question was that it is obviously a broth. It’s a liquid that picks up flavor because other food sits in it for a while during its preparation process.

And then I read Alta's response about broth being clear and meat-based, and I briefly lost my way. In a panic, I checked search result after search result, looking for something, anything that could bring back my stable sense of reality.1 For a while, I was almost hopeless. I thought that I might have to deal with the terrifying reality that cereal milk could be a sauce, or worse... a soup. Then, when I was about to give up forever, I found THIS:

Via Merriam-Webster: A broth is "liquid in which meat, fish, cereal grains, or vegetables have been cooked" (emphasis added).

And so I found my way again, back from the sad, dark world of cereal-milk sauces.

It's a broth.2

Best,

Josefina

Confirmation bias for the win!

Yes, I’m aware that breakfast cereal in milk is not exactly what they meant by “cereal grains“ being “cooked.” I have to stand by it anyway because the thought of anyone consuming cereal milk as it is, without cooking it/adding things to it, just grosses me out. If you wanna use cereal milk as an ingredient, it’s weird, but go ahead. If you want to serve cereal milk as a SOUP, or spoon it over something as a SAUCE, I will still love you, but you’re off the hook to bring something for Thanksgiving dinner.

A:

Dear Golden Girl, 

Your question makes me uncomfortable. 

 

But since it's my (voluntary) job to answer it: 

Milk with cereal in it is breakfast, plain and simple. If pressed, I might hesitantly and squirmingly respond 'breakfast soup'.

The leftover cinnamon toast milk is a beverage. I mean, it essentially tastes like horchata anyway. 

 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

A:

Dear Heart of Gold,

The answer to your question lies in the ratio of milk to cereal. 

If the concoction is more cereal than milk, it's a soup. It's not a broth, I'm with Alta that a broth needs to be like clear and meat based. It's a soup because, fundamentally, it's a liquid medium that carries and conveys other food chunks. I would compare it to, say, a clam chowder. And before you get up in arms, cold soups exist.

However, if the mixture is more milk than cereal, it's a beverage. I discussed this with Quixotic Mom and we decided that it was like hot chocolate, a smoothie, or a boba beverage. Just because there are bits in there, (marshmallows, fruit chunks, bobas) doesn't mean that it loses its right to be a beverage. That's still a drink, baby!

-Quixotic Kid

A:

Dear Goldie,

It's just gross.

~Anathema has always hated the milk that's left after a bowl of cereal

A:

Dear Goldie,

It's definitely a sauce, and all these people calling it a broth are freaking me out. In cooking broths are usually clear-ish, and the Wikipedia page on broths defines them as "a savory liquid made of water in which bones, meat, or vegetables have been simmered." SAVORY. USED TO SIMMER VEGETABLES AND MEAT. MADE OF WATER. So milk in cereal is definitely not a broth.

Sauces, on the other hand, can be any flavor you want, and can be made of just about anything. True, it's a lot of sauce, but there are a lot of meals that are eaten with a lot of sauce (curry comes to mind). Just having a lot of it doesn't turn it into a broth somehow.

-Alta

A:

Dear Goldie,

Unpleasant questions like these are precisely why I maintain my stance that milk and cereal should never be put together.

Seriously.

This is just disgusting.

Genuinely,

9S

A:

Dear Goldie,

One definition of broth is: "liquid in which meat, fish, cereal grains, or vegetables have been COOKED." While broth and soup are both mixtures of food and liquid, I think that a broth needs to be cooked but soup doesn't have to be. So, if you're talking about dry cereal and milk combined, I'd call that a soup. 

If you're talking about what's left after you mix cereal and milk and eat all of the cereal, I'd call that a beverage.

But if I ever heard someone just casually refer to cereal as a "soup" or "beverage," I would be horrified. Would that be a dealbreaker? Absolutely. 

-Fozzie

A:

Dear Rosie,

As you can see there is no consensus between the writers. Some say broth, some say beverage. Most agree that the idea of said liquid as a broth is quite uncomfortable. Beverage doesn't quite work either. That's because both of those options are WRONG.

There is only one answer. And that my friends is that the liquid is a sandwich filling. Cinnamon toast crunch pieces are miniature pieces of bread, and the milk is the filling between them.

 MilkSandwhich.PNG

Maybe you're saying "after the cereal is all gone, what then?". The answer is that after the cereal is gone there are still microscopic pieces of cereal. Boom! Micro-sandwich!

Micro-Sandwich.PNG 

The truth has been served.

Peace,

Tipperary

Question #92741 posted on 11/04/2019 1:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

It's Halloween. Ghost stories?

-2spooky4me

A:

SPPOOOOk,

I don't have a lot of time this week to write up any ghost stories. But, if you haven't gathered, I fricking love ghosts. So I'll give you some leads on excellent spook literature, and some favorite old horror radio show episodes. I won't go into movies [such as Lights Out (2016), Rear Window (1958), The Others (2001)] because your question is about ghost stories, which to me is about getting scared because of words exclusively. 

Print:

The Turn of the Screw by Henry James is a quick little novella. A governess takes a new job at a remote estate. The kids might be haunted, and the servants are creepy. Though a little hard to follow, it is so so so good. The original psychological/paranormal thriller, it is one of the most effective cases of "Is it real or is she crazy?"

Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury is just soaked in windy October spookiness, and delicious descriptive morsels of two little boys growing up through very different choices. 

The Judge's House is a short story by Brahm Stoker and this one is the most accessible spook I've named. It's the shortest and most easily comprehended read. Gets right into your skin, really well paced and graduating. 

The Body Snatcher by Robert Louis Stevenson is pretty good too. It has a creepy feeling throughout and then one good serious spook at the end. 

Radio:

Ghost Hunt: An irreverent radio-show host stays the night in a haunted house as a stunt. Possibly my favorite horror radio episode of all time. It's spooky, minimally campy, has some real plot to it, actually very scary. 

The Judge's House: If you're trying to get spooked on the go, or with a group of people, this is a very effective adaptation of the short story. There are some differences but I liked it. 

The House in Cypress Canyon: A couple with car trouble stay in an abandoned house, but there's a noise coming from the closet. This one is outright campy (and maybe a little sexist?), but employs the radio medium most effectively. Something about the aged audio, and audio being the only stimuli, makes scary sounds way way scarier, and they use it against you and it's awesome. 

I haven't listened to this one yet, but I hope to try it this Halloween:

The Screaming Woman: Adapted from a Ray Bradbury story about a woman hearing screams from under a parking lot. 

 

So there you have it. Get some friends together who don't mind old things, and don't feel the need to go to a dance party for Halloween. Give them a blanket, homemade pumpkin pie, and the choice of hot chocolate or cider. Cast these episodes to your TV and turn out the lights. Listen closely, and kindly shush those who don't take it seriously. Hold the hands of those who are more afraid than they want to be. Happy Halloween!

Babalugats

A:

Dear Ruthie,

I had a babysitter who used to tell me stories about nightmarchers, and I was absolutely terrified of them (still am, if I'm being honest...) So, for me, there are really no other ghost stories that can compete.

Sincerely,

Cerulean

A:

Dear you,

Recently, I was asking my sister (not Alta) if she believed in ghosts. With that setting the tone for the conversation, she told me the following story:

I was just three or four at the time, making my sister eleven or twelve. Our parents were out and so it was just the five of us kids in the house. My sister was probably reading a book when I interrupted her, saying there was a strange woman underneath my bed. Of course she didn't believe me, but to soothe my fears she agreed to check. And found a woman under my bed. According to my sister, this woman had bright red hair that wasn't the natural shade of red, but red like blood. Her lips matched her hair with everything else pure white. Except for her burning green eyes. That were staring straight from under the bed. 

My sister promptly collected me and said we were just going to play outside the house for a while.

I have absolutely no memory of this, and a couple weeks ago was the very first time my sister had ever told this story. Apparently she thought it was too weird or something to inform our parents about when they got back from wherever they were (to the horror of our mother when she heard this a couple weeks ago), and never saw a reason to tell it. To my knowledge, no one else in our family ever saw this woman, and by the time my sister ventured back into my room, the woman had disappeared. 

One more thing. This sister has a rare condition where she can't visualize things. Like, she can't picture anything in her mind. All this makes it especially unlikely that she would have imagined a face from innocuous objects from under the bed.

~Anathema 

A:

Dear 2fast2spookious,

Why make up a ghost story when we can talk about HOW KEY LIME PIE WAS INVENTED BY A GHOST.

Key lime pie is the official dessert of Halloween now. That's just how it is, I don't make the rules.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Spooky,

I don't know a lot of ghost stories, but here is a really strange New York Times article from 1898 about a ghost moving a box of macaroni and a man of "intelligent appearance."

We need more journalism like this today. More ghosts. More macaroni. That is my soapbox. 

-Fozzie

A:

Dear Spooooopy Halloween, 

Oh, you mean this Ghost Stories? Good call. 

Cheers, 

Guesthouse

Question #92739 posted on 11/04/2019 12:29 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I've been looking into the Technology and Engineering Studies (Technical) major, and it seems really interesting. I plan to continue seeking advisement and finding out more about it on my own, but was hoping one or more of you writers might be someone or know someone in that major who could give me their two cents on their experience in the major so far:

- likes/dislikes about the major
- general experience in the major
- favorite class
- what they want to do with their major (or their emphasis, since this seems like a really flexible major in that regard)
- what kind of people/careers this major caters to in their opinion
- the general vibe of the professors and other faculty/staff
- things you wished you had known before going into this major

...and anything else that comes to mind. Hopefully there will be someone who can vouch for the Technology and Engineering Studies major!

- Major Interest (who kinda wishes there was some sort of equivalent to ratemyprofessors.com for majors)

A:

Dear Major,

When I went to talk to my friend who is the secretary for the School of Technology, I ended up talking to a girl who is in the technical track of the Technology and Engineering Studies major. I definitely found someone who could vouch for the major. Here's what she said.

  • She likes how it's a very customizable major. She called it a "build-your-own-major major." There's a few core classes for everyone in the major, but other than that, you can choose what direction you want to go. She loves how hands-on and project-based it is. She also mentioned that she likes that it is an open major, which is a lot less stressful than having to apply for a program. She dislikes that she found the major so late! She wishes it was better advertised and had found it sooner. She also mentioned some of the downsides of it being so customizable: it's less straightforward what classes to take and you have to take some initiative in designing your education. She compared it to a grocery store, rather than other majors that are more like restaurants. 
  • Her favorite class has been Dr. Shumway's basic electronics class.
  • She doesn't know exactly what she wants to do with her degree.
  • In general, the major caters to people who are hands-on learners and good at problem solving. It's also good for someone who wants to dabble in a lot of things. In terms of careers, there are people going into industrial design, graphic design, architecture, user experience, web development, etc.
  • She loves the professors. She said they are funny and personable. Because there are only 3 professors and about 60-70 students, they are all pretty close-knit.
  • She recommended coming to the weekly major seminar if you want get a feel for what the major is like. The speakers could also give you a better idea of what future career options are possible for students in the major. It's technically an actual class (TES 291R), but she said she didn't think anyone would mind/notice if you just sat in a couple times. This semester it's Thursdays at 11am.

Good luck! Hope this helps!

Sincerely,

Cerulean

A:

Dear MI,

One of my roommates from last year is in this major. She didn't have time to answer every one of your questions, but she did have some to say:

Teachers: The teachers are welcoming and very willing to work with struggling students. Because there are only three professors specific to the major, students get to know them pretty well. They're great at including all of their students and adjusting things like TA schedules to fit the needs of their students. They understand that different types of teaching are important for different students, and plan their classes accordingly. The teachers and advisors have been eager to give useful guidance with regard to careers and classes. The professors all have a good sense of humor. 

Careers: The students in TES are all over the place, goal-wise. Because of that, the major isn't overly competitive. My friend wants to build boats and pipe organs. Her friends want to do all manner of things, including teach community college classes, build bikes, start a wedding ring company, work in broadcasting and TV journalism, work in graphic design, and teach wood shop. She thinks that all of her friends are pretty prepared for their career. Lots of classes count as electives for the major, as long as you can justify them within your career goals.

Favorite class: Her favorite class so far has been her teaching class. Geoff Wright is the professor for it, and he also teaches other classes within the major. It's a primer on how to teach, how people learn, and pedagogy. She especially likes it because it helps students practice getting over quirks of public speaking. 

Hopefully this helps!

Best,

Josefina